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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2000

Karen Brown, Heather McIlveen and Christopher Strugnell

The need for effective nutritional education for young consumers has become increasingly apparent given their general food habits and behaviour, particularly during adolescence…

9773

Abstract

The need for effective nutritional education for young consumers has become increasingly apparent given their general food habits and behaviour, particularly during adolescence. Aims to analyse the interaction between young consumers’ food preferences and their nutritional awareness behaviour, within three environments (home, school and social). Preliminary findings in this study would indicate that the perceived dominance of this home, school and social interaction appears to be somewhat overshadowed by the young consumers, developing “independence” trait, particularly during adolescent years. This appears to be reflected in their food preferences within the associated three environments. Suggests that such food preferences are often of a “fast food”‐style and consequently the food habits of many young consumers may fuel the consumption of poor nutritionally balanced meals. While young consumers were aware of healthy eating, their food preference behaviour did not always appear to reflect such knowledge, particularly within the school and social environments.

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Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 30 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

Heather McIlveen and Julie Buchanan

This preliminary study investigated the factors which influence consumer choice of beef. A questionnaire and sensory evaluation considered the level of importance which consumers…

1501

Abstract

This preliminary study investigated the factors which influence consumer choice of beef. A questionnaire and sensory evaluation considered the level of importance which consumers attached to the sensory (intrinsic) properties of beef, as compared to extrinsic factors. It was found that consumers use sensory properties to predict safety, freshness and overall eating quality but they can also misinterpret the quality cues. Expectations play a prominent role in evaluating beef quality and sensory evaluation revealed that when consumers were made aware of the beef cut, fat content and place of purchase, they altered their overall assessment of quality to conform with their expectations. It was concluded that consumers utilise a combination of sensory properties and other extrinsic factors to predict and assess beef quality. The particular combination used, however, appears to vary considerably from one consumer to another and with the particular use occasion.

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Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1999

Heather McIlveen, Clare Abraham and Gillian Armstrong

Manufacturers are producing an extensive range of added value products which are formulated using meat replacers but which are designed to appeal to a wide range of consumers…

2743

Abstract

Manufacturers are producing an extensive range of added value products which are formulated using meat replacers but which are designed to appeal to a wide range of consumers, above and beyond the “traditional vegetarian” market. This study considered the relatively recent impact of such products on the Northern Ireland market, with a particular emphasis on the quality and acceptability of Quorn based products. A small‐ scale questionnaire (n = 100) considered customer perceptions of meat replacers, whilst the acceptance of selected tofu, textured vegetable protein (TVP) and Quorn products was measured using selected sensory evaluation techniques. The study concluded that Quorn can offer similar texture and flavour attributes to those consumers who wish to avoid meat products for health and/or safety reasons. It is this customer base which needs to be targeted, but it must be noted that negative perceptions of meat replacers still exist. Therefore, further developments need to be supported by appropriate marketing strategies which will both attract and educate consumers and help to achieve a sustained level of purchasing.

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Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 99 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1996

Heather McIlveen and Gillian Armstrong

The potential value of sensory analysis has often been undermined in the food industry, where results tend to be viewed with scepticism. In reality, however, various forms of…

1555

Abstract

The potential value of sensory analysis has often been undermined in the food industry, where results tend to be viewed with scepticism. In reality, however, various forms of sensory‐related work can provide an important investigative and informative function in a number of areas. This may include consumer preference and buying behaviour, product development, production and quality control. The objective must be to achieve a realistic balance between sensory and instrumental methods and to manage the sensory process effectively, if results are to be meaningful. The main problem, however, is in dealing with people and their variability. A preliminary study assessed the potential value of using computerized systems to help improve the credibility of sensory analysis and, in particular, to maintain and improve panel motivation and consistency of response. Generally, accuracy improved significantly as tests progressed and panellists preferred using the computerized system.

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Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 96 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Content available
837

Abstract

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Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Content available
996

Abstract

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Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2000

Sinead Furey, Heather McIlveen, Christopher Strugnell and Gillian Armstrong

1668

Abstract

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Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 30 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2000

Joanna Gibson, Gillian Armstrong and Heather McIlveen

Salt is one of the most valuable substances available to man, with a definitive role in the human body and in food production. However, the continued use or indeed misuse of salt…

2564

Abstract

Salt is one of the most valuable substances available to man, with a definitive role in the human body and in food production. However, the continued use or indeed misuse of salt has led to adverse effects on health. The increasing consumption of convenience foods has contributed greatly to a high salt intake. Highly processed, convenience foods are known to contain large quantities of salt to optimise storage stability and flavour acceptability. Current high salt intakes have therefore been attributed to processed foods, accounting for 75‐85 per cent of total salt intake. Such findings and associated health implications have prompted a call from health professionals and food researchers to reduce salt intake. Effective salt reduction, however, can only be achieved with the co‐operation and commitment of the food industry in the development of lower‐salt processed foods.

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Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1997

Paul Humphreys, Kate Greenan and Heather McIlveen

Student assessment and the development of transferable personal skills are receiving increasing attention in higher education establishments. Examines the potential for enhancing…

30190

Abstract

Student assessment and the development of transferable personal skills are receiving increasing attention in higher education establishments. Examines the potential for enhancing student learning through the development of groupwork, presentation and self‐ and peer‐assessment skills. Describes a methodology which indicates the approach adopted and a questionnaire evaluates students’ impressions of the process. Concludes that skill development does take place and that students find groupwork an enjoyable learning experience. With regard to self and peer‐assessment, students were not as enthusiastic. Ultimately, there is a need to continue to involve students so that they can see evaluation in a positive, developmental light and to encourage students to take a more proactive role in assessing their performance.

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Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1996

Heather McIlveen and Claire Vallely

Given factors such as increasing competition, price and quota influences and changing consumer trends, many dairy companies have tried to move away from an overdependence on the…

545

Abstract

Given factors such as increasing competition, price and quota influences and changing consumer trends, many dairy companies have tried to move away from an overdependence on the production of staple dairy products, towards diversification into newer and broader product ranges. Outlines work carried out in conjunction with a UK manufacturer to develop a good quality smoked processed cheese. However, also illustrates the benefits of a logical and systematic approach to the development process, making best use of available techniques, including chemical and sensory analysis. Such an approach is not particularly innovative, nor need it be very expensive, but it can be extremely effective. Work involved modifying recipe and process parameters, followed by consideration of suitable smoking methods. Options were tested by an in‐house trained sensory panel, as well as by a consumer panel and a final product was obtained, incorporating Cheddar cheese and a liquid smoke flavour.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 98 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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