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A case for reducing salt in processed foods

Joanna Gibson (PhD Research Student in the Consumer Studies Division, University of Ulster, Jordanstown, Nothern Ireland.)
Gillian Armstrong (Lecturer on the Consumer Studies Programme, University of Ulster, Jordanstown, Nothern Ireland.)
Heather McIlveen (Course Director of the Consumer Studies Programme, University of Ulster, Jordanstown, Nothern Ireland.)

Nutrition & Food Science

ISSN: 0034-6659

Article publication date: 1 August 2000

Abstract

Salt is one of the most valuable substances available to man, with a definitive role in the human body and in food production. However, the continued use or indeed misuse of salt has led to adverse effects on health. The increasing consumption of convenience foods has contributed greatly to a high salt intake. Highly processed, convenience foods are known to contain large quantities of salt to optimise storage stability and flavour acceptability. Current high salt intakes have therefore been attributed to processed foods, accounting for 75‐85 per cent of total salt intake. Such findings and associated health implications have prompted a call from health professionals and food researchers to reduce salt intake. Effective salt reduction, however, can only be achieved with the co‐operation and commitment of the food industry in the development of lower‐salt processed foods.

Keywords

Citation

Gibson, J., Armstrong, G. and McIlveen, H. (2000), "A case for reducing salt in processed foods", Nutrition & Food Science, Vol. 30 No. 4, pp. 167-173. https://doi.org/10.1108/00346650010329380

Publisher

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MCB UP Ltd

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