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Book part

William Attwood-Charles and Sarah Babb

Originally developed by the Japanese firm Toyota in the 1950s, the core innovation of lean production is to reorient all organizational activity around continuous…

Abstract

Originally developed by the Japanese firm Toyota in the 1950s, the core innovation of lean production is to reorient all organizational activity around continuous improvement and the elimination of waste. We use the case of lean production in two healthcare organizations to explore the process of translating management models into new environments (Czarniawska & Sevón, 1996; Mohr, 1998). We draw on insights from organizational sociology and social movement theory to understand the strategies of actors as they attempt to overcome opposition to model transfer (Battilana, Leca, & Boxenbaum, 2009; Friedland & Alford, 1991; Snow, Rochford, Worden, & Benford, 1986). We examine two attempts to export lean production to healthcare organizations: Riverside Hospital, a research and teaching institution, and Lakeview Associations, a managed health provider. We use these cases to illustrate two ways that management models can get lost in the process of institutional translation: model attenuation, and model decoupling.

Details

Emerging Conceptions of Work, Management and the Labor Market
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-459-0

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Article

Satyanarayana Parayitam, Lonnie D. Phelps and Bradley J. Olson

Research on strategic decision‐making has emphasized the importance of team decision‐making as it brings the benefits of synergy. Literature on healthcare is silent on the…

Abstract

Purpose

Research on strategic decision‐making has emphasized the importance of team decision‐making as it brings the benefits of synergy. Literature on healthcare is silent on the role of professional doctors in the strategic decision‐making process and their impact on decision outcomes. The purpose of the present paper is to empirically examine the outcomes of decisions when physician executives were involved in strategic decision‐making process in healthcare organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a structured survey instrument, this paper gathered data from 361 senior executives from 109 hospitals in USA and analyzed the data using regression techniques on whether the presence of physicians in strategic decision‐making processes enhanced decision quality, commitment, and understanding.

Findings

Results showed the presence of professional doctors in the decision‐making process enhances commitment and decision quality in healthcare organizations.

Research limitations/implications

Only the healthcare industry was considered. Self‐report measures may have some inherent social desirability bias.

Practical implications

This study contributes to both practicing managers as well as to strategic management literature. This study suggests that healthcare administrators need to engage physician executives in strategic decision‐making to have successful decision outcomes.

Originality/value

To the extent strategic decision‐making process is similar in other industries, the findings can be generalizable across other industries.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article

Satyanarayana Parayitam

Research on strategic decision making has over‐emphasized the importance of competence‐based trust among the team members. Literature on healthcare is silent on the impact…

Abstract

Purpose

Research on strategic decision making has over‐emphasized the importance of competence‐based trust among the team members. Literature on healthcare is silent on the impact of competence‐based trust between the physicians and administrators on decision outcomes. The purpose of this paper is to empirically investigate whether competence‐based trust between physician executives and administrators is beneficial to the healthcare organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a structured instrument, data are collected from top management teams of 109 US hospitals. The participants include both CEOs and administrators and physician executives. The data are analyzed using multiple regression technique to examine the role of competence‐based trust between the physicians and administrative executives in enhancing decision quality, commitment and understanding.

Findings

Results show that competence‐based trust is the key to successful strategic decision making while lack of trust may hinder the effectiveness of decision implementation in healthcare organizations.

Research limitations/implications

Only the healthcare industry is considered. Self‐report measures may have some common method bias and social desirability bias.

Practical implications

This study contributes to both practicing managers as well as to strategic management literature. This study suggests that development and retention of competence‐based trust between the administrators and physicians is essential in making decision‐making process effective and successful.

Originality/value

Though the study represents the US hospitals, to the extent the strategic decision process is similar across the world, the findings can be generalized to other healthcare organizations in the world.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

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Article

José Ferreira, Carlos Gomes and Mahmoud Yasin

This paper aims to present an applied research effort aimed at re‐engineering the utilization practices of operating rooms for a public Portuguese hospital. This…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present an applied research effort aimed at re‐engineering the utilization practices of operating rooms for a public Portuguese hospital. This re‐engineering effort is motivated by the desire to enhance the patient‐orientation of the hospital. The role of information systems in facilitating such organizational change is also to be examined.

Design/methodology/approach

Actual data are used to simulate outcomes of three different operational scenarios related to the utilization of operating rooms and surgical teams. As such, the critical constraint related to surgical capacity is relaxed under different utilization scenarios.

Findings

Based on the findings of the study, it appears that there is no conflict between operational efficiency and patient satisfaction. Well‐designed operational changes can lead to both efficiency and patient satisfaction benefits. This, in turn, can translate into competitive strategic advantage for the hospital.

Research limitations/implications

The simulation results derived from this applied research are positive. In general, they tend to point to potential operational and strategic benefits to the hospital and its patients. Although the simulation model used in this study was validated using actual data, more research is needed to test its general applicability. Such research should shed more light on the interrelationships which exist within the hospital operating system.

Practical implications

The approach advocated in this research has operational and strategic relevance to healthcare policy makers and hospitals' administrators. In this context, the role of the information systems in providing information relevant to tracking and improving a hospital's performance is emphasized.

Originality/value

The paper presents a practical, applied, systematic approach toward enhancing operational effectiveness in healthcare organizations. It draws on bodies of knowledge pretending to system theory, simulation and operations management in order to improve the short‐term performance of hospitals.

Details

Clinical Governance: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7274

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Article

Karen Harlos

The purpose of this paper is to examine anger associated with types of negative work events experienced by health administrators and to examine the impact of anger on…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine anger associated with types of negative work events experienced by health administrators and to examine the impact of anger on intent to leave.

Design/methodology/approach

Textual data analysis is used to measure anger in open‐ended survey responses from administrative staff of a Canadian hospital. Multivariate regression is applied to predict anger from event type, on the one hand, and turnover intentions from anger, on the other.

Findings

Person‐related negative events contributed to administrator anger more than policy‐related events. Anger from events predicted turnover intentions after adjusting for numerous potential confounds.

Research limitations/implications

Future studies using larger samples across multiple sites are needed to test the generalizability of results.

Practical implications

Results provide useful information for retention strategies through codifying respect and fairness in interactions and policies. Health organizations stand to gain efficiencies by helping administrators handle anger effectively, leading to more stable staffing levels and more pleasurable, productive work environments.

Originality/value

This paper addresses gaps in knowledge about determinants of turnover in this population by examining the impact of administrator anger on intent to leave and the work events which give rise to anger. Given the strategic importance of health administration work and the high costs to health organizations when administrators leave, results hold particular promise for health human resources.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article

Carlos F. Gomes, Mahmoud M. Yasin and Yousef Yasin

The purpose of this paper is to propose a systematic approach to measuring, tracking, monitoring and continuously improving efficiency, availability and quality in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a systematic approach to measuring, tracking, monitoring and continuously improving efficiency, availability and quality in healthcare operational settings.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed measure of healthcare operational effectiveness (HOE) consists of three indicators. They include an availability indicator, an quality indicator, and an efficiency indicator. The proposed approach tends to facilitate the systematic improvement at the different facets of operational effectiveness.

Findings

The proposed operational performance approach based on the HOE is consistent with the themes of performance measures and measurement reported in the literature.

Research limitations/implications

The proposed healthcare operational effectiveness approach represents a serious attempt at quantifying the key facets of service effectiveness in healthcare operational settings. The validation of this performance assessment and measurement approach is worthy of future research.

Practical implications

The approach advocated by the HOE has operational and strategic relevance to decision makers of healthcare organizations.

Originality/value

This paper presents a practical, systematic approach toward enhancing operational effectiveness in healthcare organizations. Relevant implementation issues associated with the proposed approach are also addressed.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article

Jill Barr-Walker

The purpose of this paper is to assess the involvement of libraries in health literacy programs and initiatives based on a review of the literature.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the involvement of libraries in health literacy programs and initiatives based on a review of the literature.

Design/methodology/approach

Four databases were searched for papers that described health literacy programs and initiatives within libraries.

Findings

Several themes of health literacy programs in libraries emerged: health literacy for older adults, underserved populations, the general public, healthcare professionals, and medical students, and patients. Collaborations between libraries and community organizations were frequently used.

Practical implications

Librarians may use this review to understand the history of health literacy efforts and libraries to inform future programming. This review will contextualize current research on health literacy and libraries.

Originality/value

Despite the currency and relevance of this topic, there are no literature reviews on health literacy and librarianship.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 44 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Abstract

Details

Journal of Enabling Technologies, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-6263

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Article

Mahmoud M. Yasin, Marwan Wafa and Michael H. Small

Investigates several facets of the implementation of just‐in‐time (JIT) using a two‐tiered empirical approach that included a field study and a mailed survey. The 277…

Abstract

Investigates several facets of the implementation of just‐in‐time (JIT) using a two‐tiered empirical approach that included a field study and a mailed survey. The 277 respondents to the survey included 130 manufacturing organizations, 61 service organizations and 86 public sector organizations in the USA. Five hypotheses were tested. The results indicate that while all the organization types had enacted procedural and operational modifications in support of their JIT implementations, there were some differences in the impact that these modifications had in reducing problems during the implementation and on the eventual outcome of the project. Suggests areas where benchmarking can be utilized by the various organization types to alleviate potential problems in the JIT implementation process and to improve their chances of success.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article

Amy Yarbrough Landry and Larry R. Hearld

The purpose of this study is to examine the prevalence of different workplace learning models in healthcare organizations and examine whether these learning styles and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the prevalence of different workplace learning models in healthcare organizations and examine whether these learning styles and activities differ across hierarchical level.

Design/methodology/approach

Results of a survey of US healthcare executives and executive‐track employees were analyzed (n=492). The survey asked for information on workplace learning style, hierarchical position, and workplace learning opportunities.

Findings

Employees at all levels of the organization report learning in a variety of ways in the workplace, including through transmission, experience, communities of practice, competence, and activity. However, employees at lower hierarchical levels report fewer workplace learning opportunities than those at higher levels.

Research limitations/implications

The study utilizes cross‐sectional data on healthcare executives who are relatively homogenous with regard to race and gender.

Practical implications

The results of the study are positive in that a variety of workplace learning opportunities are available to executives and executive‐track employees. However, placing more emphasis on the development of director and manager level employees would further enhance the talent pool for executive level leadership in US hospitals.

Originality/value

The study demonstrates differences in learning styles and opportunities for learning across hierarchical level.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

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