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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1995

Graeme A. Murdoch

Discusses the profile of a learning organization as described bySenge. Describes the current organizational status of Brooksby College,Leicestershire, UK, in relation to a

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Abstract

Discusses the profile of a learning organization as described by Senge. Describes the current organizational status of Brooksby College, Leicestershire, UK, in relation to a college‐devised quality assurance programme (QAP). Then applies the results of this research to Senge’s profile of a learning organization to show that Brooksby College has the attributes, and means, of becoming a learning organization. Further shows that the vehicle for this development is the QAP.

Details

Training for Quality, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4875

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 September 2023

Graeme Ditchburn and Rachel Evangeline Koh

COVID-19 forced organizations to implement protective measures changing how employees worked; however, empirical evidence is needed to explore how employees responded. This study…

Abstract

Purpose

COVID-19 forced organizations to implement protective measures changing how employees worked; however, empirical evidence is needed to explore how employees responded. This study examines the impact of COVID-19-related organizational changes in Singapore on employees’ perceptions of work pressure, stress and mental well-being (MWB) and the mediating role of resilience.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used a cross-sectional, anonymous online survey of 157 full-time employees who had worked for at least one year.

Findings

The results found that work pressure and stress had increased, and MWB had declined. Resilience acted as a buffer against increases in work pressure and stress while promoting the maintenance of MWB. Resilience significantly mediated the relationship between stress and MWB.

Research limitations/implications

The study does not allow for an assessment of causality but infers possible, albeit probable, casual relationships. Furthermore, stress and well-being could be influenced by a multitude of factors beyond organizational change. Future research should seek to account for additional factors and establish the generalisability of the findings beyond Singapore.

Practical implications

This study supports the engagement of resilience-based interventions to improve employees’ MWB during pandemic related organizational change.

Social implications

Policies that promote work-life balance, positive interpersonal relations and staying connected are some of the ways employers can bolster MWB and work-life balance to support employees who are engaged in remote work.

Originality/value

Given the unique context of COVID-19, this study allows for a better understanding of how a novel worldwide pandemic has transformed employees' experience of work and its associated impacts.

Details

Evidence-based HRM: a Global Forum for Empirical Scholarship, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-3983

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 December 2015

Graeme Ditchburn and Elizabeth R Brook

Expatriate workforces are growing as a result of globalisation and the considerable cost associated with expatriation is a strong incentive to identify which employees are most…

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Abstract

Purpose

Expatriate workforces are growing as a result of globalisation and the considerable cost associated with expatriation is a strong incentive to identify which employees are most likely to adjust to the host nation. One area relevant to cross-cultural adjustment is interpersonal needs. The theory of fundamental interpersonal relations orientation as measured by the fundamental interpersonal relations orientation-behaviour (FIRO-B) may offer insights as to the relationship between interpersonal needs and cross-cultural adjustment. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 180 paper and pencil measures of the FIRO-B and expatriate adjustment scales (general, work, and interaction) were distributed via informed international associates and convenience and snowball sampling. In total, 112 expatriates from the UK (44 percent), South Africa (22 percent), India (20 percent), and other nations (14 percent) returned completed questionnaires.

Findings

Expatriates with higher levels of wanted affection were higher on all subscales of cross-cultural adjustment. Those who wanted and expressed the need for inclusion were significantly higher in interaction adjustment while those who expressed and wanted control were less adjusted to work.

Research limitations/implications

The cross-sectional design limits the extent to which these findings can be interpreted as causal and the small sample size may limit the generalisability of the findings and common method via self-report may also inflate inter-relationship. However, the underlying theoretical premise would strongly support the hypothesised directional relationships in the normal population. A number of factors beyond the scope of this study may play a fundamental role including cultural similarity.

Practical implications

Whilst not predictive, and acknowledging that environmental factors may vary, these results give an indication that interpersonal needs are related to successful adjustment in expatriates. As such these findings could be used to help inform the recruitment and training of expatriates in areas of interpersonal interaction taking into consideration intrapersonal needs.

Originality/value

No study to date has explored the inter-relationship between the interpersonal needs and expatriate adjustment. This is the first paper to do so and identify that there is a significant association between expatriate’s motives for interaction and their level of cross-cultural adjustment.

Details

Journal of Global Mobility, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-8799

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 22 April 2013

John Harrison

This chapter examines the changes proposed to the current media ethics and regulation regime in Australia following a government inquiry by former Federal Court judge Ray…

Abstract

This chapter examines the changes proposed to the current media ethics and regulation regime in Australia following a government inquiry by former Federal Court judge Ray Finkelstein. The inquiry was prompted by The News of the World phone hacking scandal in the United Kingdom, which resulted in that publication being closed down by its publisher, News International, and principal shareholder Rupert Murdoch. While finding no evidence of similar misbehaviour by journalists and proprietors in Australia, Finkelstein recommended the establishment of a statutory News Media Council, and the inclusion of online media outlets in this new regulatory regime. This chapter argues that such a regime is unlikely to come into effect, given that it will be opposed by media proprietors and working journalists alike, as well the Federal Opposition, and the taxpayer funded ABC, and that a government with low levels of political capital is unlikely to risk much of that capital in a fight with the media industries in an election year.

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Graeme Martin, Judy Pate, Phil Beaumont and Alan Murdoch

This paper examines the problems involved in developing collective bargaining in the traditionally non‐union environment of the strategically important UK offshore oil industry…

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Abstract

This paper examines the problems involved in developing collective bargaining in the traditionally non‐union environment of the strategically important UK offshore oil industry. In doing so it provides evidence on the success of the “new”, stakeholder industrial relations environment established by the present UK government. Drawing on an in‐depth insight into management and union strategies gained from action research, the paper documents the attempt to establish a collective agreement and a partnership approach to industrial relations in the drilling sector of the North Sea offshore oil industry, a sector which has had no previous history of unionisation. In doing the research provides evidence partnership policy, the literature on union recognition and the process of negotiation in international organisations.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 23 June 2005

Abstract

Details

Corporate Governance: Does Any Size Fit?
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-342-6

Article
Publication date: 6 March 2009

Graeme Newell, Kwong Wing Chau and Siu Kei Wong

International investors have shown considerable recent interest regarding property investment in China via both direct and indirect property. The purpose of this paper is to…

1906

Abstract

Purpose

International investors have shown considerable recent interest regarding property investment in China via both direct and indirect property. The purpose of this paper is to assess the significance and performance of the China commercial property market compared to six developed and emerging commercial property markets in Asia.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper analyses the performance of commercial property in China over 1998‐2007 for both direct and indirect property. Risk‐adjusted performance analysis is used to assess the added value of China commercial property in a pan‐Asia portfolio, with the portfolio diversification benefits of China commercial property also assessed. Sub‐period analyses are also used to assess the dynamics of China commercial property.

Findings

This paper finds that China commercial property has shown significantly enhanced performance and diversification benefits in recent years. In a pan‐Asia property fund context, there are clear diversification benefits provided by China commercial property, with these benefits also being evident in the other Asian property markets. The findings highlight the benefits of a pan‐Asia property investment strategy by international property investors, as well as the key benefits and added‐value of including China commercial property in this pan‐Asia property investment strategy.

Originality/value

Previous empirical research into the China commercial property markets has been very limited. This paper rigorously assesses the role of China commercial property in a pan‐Asia property portfolio context. Given the increasing interest by the leading international property investors regarding investing in China commercial property, this research enables more informed and practical investment decision‐making regarding the role of both direct and indirect China commercial property as part of a pan‐Asia institutional property investment strategy.

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 September 2013

David Oglethorpe and Graeme Heron

The purpose of the research is to identify the observable operational and supply chain barriers and constraints that occur in local food supply chains, especially with smaller…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the research is to identify the observable operational and supply chain barriers and constraints that occur in local food supply chains, especially with smaller producers, as they seek to increase market penetration across a wider geographic area.

Design/methodology/approach

The research adopts a multiple case study approach using mixed methods of data collection where case study companies are interviewed and complete a questionnaire. This process allows us to create a supply chain map and create a narrative which records the burdens and impacts occurring in local food supply chains and smaller producers looking beyond local markets. This evidence is then set against the theory of constraints (TOC) to provide a theoretical underpinning and to examine consistency of the findings.

Findings

Seven broad categories of constraint type are observed: constraints due to the nature of the market; due to scale and the nature of products; constraints related to employment and skills; institutional constraints; constraints in supply chain relationships; certification, policy and regulatory constraints; and constraints around personal beliefs and anthropomorphism. Each is described as to its origin, its limitation to business and where possible, how it might be remedied. The constraints point to some counter-intuitive results as far as common perceptions of local food are concerned but suggestions for improvement are made through collaborative producer efforts, alternative institutional intervention, supply chain re-engineering and logistics innovation.

Practical implications

Practical suggestions are made to improve the inclusiveness of distribution networks, to better utilise regional food groups (RFGs), to develop opportunities to set up autonomous supply chain centres, or to broaden the function of farmer co-operatives. The paper also provides an alternative model of the TOC specifically adapted for local food producers, the focus of which plays to their strengths and focuses on building competencies across, up and down the supply chain.

Originality/value

The adaptation of the TOC provides an advancement of knowledge in the area of food supply chain analysis and is done in a way that is more practical in use. The paper also provides the opportunity to take a similar approach to examining other niche supply opportunities in the sector, which may be dependent on other geographically defined barriers, such as seasonal or ethnic products.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 33 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 October 2021

Vandana Nath and Graeme Lockwood

The purpose of this study is to examine the practical and legal complexities associated with tele-homeworking in the context of the UK Equality Law. First, the paper provides a

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the practical and legal complexities associated with tele-homeworking in the context of the UK Equality Law. First, the paper provides a background to the recent growth of tele-homeworking as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, outlining the tenets of the UK Equality Act 2010 and referring to additional legislation pertinent to the ensuing discussion. Second, illustrative case law relevant to the UK Equality Law is put forward to demonstrate the potential challenges that employers and employees might encounter with continued and longer-term tele-homeworking arrangements. Third, the paper outlines implications for employers and human resource managers in terms of policies and practices that might shape the nature of the employment relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is based on a review of the literature and an examination of UK case law applicable to tele-homeworking, taking into consideration equality, diversity and inclusion concerns in the workplace.

Findings

Remote working can be beneficial to both employers and employees. However, there are a number of significant concerns surrounding the management of tele-homeworkers in the aftermath of the pandemic that can act as a stimulus for legal disputes around discrimination, infringement of human rights and breach of contract claims. Several policy implications surface from the analysis that relate to equality and fair treatment associated with both current and future work arrangements.

Originality/value

The paper is significant in offering legal insights into how the UK Equality Law relates to the complexities associated with the management of tele-homeworkers. The study also highlights how return-to-office undertakings might need to consider wider legal issues. COVID-19 and its repercussions have demanded the reorganisation of work, which can give rise to a greater possibility of legal challenges and the study highlights the importance of employers undertaking an evaluation of their equality practices and complying with the legal framework.

Details

International Journal of Law and Management, vol. 64 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-243X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 29 June 2012

Graeme Hutcheson

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Abstract

Details

Journal of Modelling in Management, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5664

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