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1 – 10 of over 1000
Article
Publication date: 25 October 2021

Jennifer M. Higgs and Grace MyHyun Kim

Research on nonschool settings suggests young people benefit from digital multimodal composition. Less is known about how digital composing can support students as they interpret…

Abstract

Purpose

Research on nonschool settings suggests young people benefit from digital multimodal composition. Less is known about how digital composing can support students as they interpret required literary class texts. To understand the potential benefits and challenges of digitally composing for literary analysis, design interviews with two high school students were conducted to examine their processes as they designed digital multimodal compositions to interpret Anglo-Saxon poems. Grounded in the social semiotic theory of multimodality, this study aims to examine how students engaged in literary analysis and interpretive digital composition within secondary ELA.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative classroom data were collected through digital means over a six-week period: a whole-class student survey, focal student semistructured design interviews, emails, field notes, analytic memos and student-created digital artifacts.

Findings

Students’ print-based literary engagements and digital multimodal composition processes were mutually shaped. Additionally, digital multimodal composition offered entry points into challenging print-based literary texts, resulting in understandings enacted across multiple forms of mediation.

Research limitations/implications

The study focused on one cycle of multimodal composition. Additional studies of students’ digital multimodal composition processes in ELA classrooms over time could be beneficial to the field.

Practical implications

The study identifies an approach to digital multimodal composition that may help teachers address and integrate core disciplinary objectives.

Originality/value

This study contributes to scholarship concerned with how “new” technologies and “old” literacies co-exist in contexts requiring students to engage in expanded communication modes alongside specific academic literacies.

Details

English Teaching: Practice & Critique, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1175-8708

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 January 2021

Lindy L. Johnson and Grace MyHyun Kim

The purpose of this study is to examine the use of game-based learning for approximations of practice within a critical, project-based (CPB) clinical experience for preservice…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the use of game-based learning for approximations of practice within a critical, project-based (CPB) clinical experience for preservice teachers (PSTs). Within the clinical experience, secondary English Language Arts PSTs practiced modeling argumentative thinking through playing a board game, Race to the White House, with ninth-grade students.

Design/methodology/approach

Data collection took place at a public high school in the mid-Atlantic region of the USA. A variety of data was collected including written reflections by PSTs about their experiences leading the game play, audio recordings of the small group game play and a transcript of a whole-class 30-min post-game discussion with the PSTs and classroom teacher. To analyze the data, patterns of discourse were identified.

Findings

The game-based learning activity provided an accessible structure for PSTs to model their own argumentative thinking, presented opportunities for PSTs to elicit and interpret students’ thinking to support students’ practice in constructing an argument and created a playful context for PSTs to encourage students to produce arguments and critique the argumentation work of others.

Research limitations/implications

Game-based learning within CPB clinical experiences has the potential to bring students, PSTs, inservice teachers and teacher educators together to experiment with how to help PSTs practice engaging with students in different ways than a traditional teacher-to-student dynamic.

Originality/value

Game design and game play within CPB clinical experiences has the potential to bring students, PSTs, inservice teachers and teacher educators together to experiment with how to make teaching and learning a more social and collaborative process.

Details

English Teaching: Practice & Critique, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1175-8708

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 February 2018

Grace Kim

Financing is cited as the major obstacle for entrepreneurs. However, data limitations have prevented study of entrepreneurs’ own impact on their financing relationships…

Abstract

Purpose

Financing is cited as the major obstacle for entrepreneurs. However, data limitations have prevented study of entrepreneurs’ own impact on their financing relationships. Gender-based studies have concerned lender constraints and discriminatory outcomes. Others which are generally examined are borrowers’ fear of denial and non-pursuit of credit. To more fully explain the financing obstacle, the purpose of this study is to uniquely examine entrepreneurial borrowers’ evaluation of and actions in their existing financing relationship. This study also captures those businesses with equal ownership gender concentration, to contribute to a deeper understanding of gender impact.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a cross-sectional sample of several thousand US small enterprises from the NFIB’s proprietary credit survey. The data set offers links between owners’ perceptions and financing behavior. Robust univariate analysis examines differences across gender ownership groups. Multivariate regression analyzes how gender, business environment and other factors determine the entrepreneurs’ financing relationships.

Findings

This study highlights how entrepreneurs affect their own financing outcomes. Findings suggest that switching lenders, seeking multiple relationships and other actions determine financing satisfaction. Growth intent, business performance and characteristics of the entrepreneur are among significant posited factors influencing perception and behavior of entrepreneurs in their financing relationships that drive business performance. Furthermore, equal ownership concentration firms appear to be similar to those primarily owned by men. This study indicates that researchers need to further delineate among entrepreneurs. The results of this study also have implications for policy-makers in their assessment of gender discrimination and government entrepreneurial financing initiatives.

Originality/value

Financing is cited as the major obstacle for entrepreneurs. However, data limitations have prevented study of entrepreneurs’ own impact on their financing relationships. Gender-based studies have concerned lender constraints and discriminatory outcomes. Others which are generally examined are borrowers’ fear of denial and non-pursuit of credit. To more fully explain the financing obstacle, this study uniquely examines entrepreneurial borrowers’ evaluation of and actions in their existing financing relationship. This study also captures those businesses with equal ownership gender concentration, to contribute to a deeper understanding of gender impact.

Details

International Journal of Gender and Entrepreneurship, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-6266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 May 2012

Graham Ferguson and Ian Phau

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how students from Australia, Indonesia and Malaysia differ in their propensity to complain and attitudes to complaining.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how students from Australia, Indonesia and Malaysia differ in their propensity to complain and attitudes to complaining.

Design/methodology/approach

A self‐administered questionnaire was designed using established scales to assess respondent reactions to a service failure by a university. The survey was completed by a sample of university students on an Australian university campus. ANOVA was used to compare differences between groups and regression was used to explore the relationship between attitudes and their complaining behaviours.

Findings

Australian students have a less positive attitude to complaining than Malaysian and Indonesian consumers. Contrary to expectations, “switching” behaviours were not revealed as a separate dimension of complaining behaviours, however switching was identified with online complaining as part of a new complaining dimension related to taking action outside of the organisation. Malaysian and Indonesian students are more likely to complain in this way. Surprisingly, Indonesian students are less likely to remain loyal to the service provider and Australian students were less likely to “voice” internally to the service provider. Having a positive attitude to complaining was positively related to taking action outside the organisation and to voicing within the organisation, while negative attitudes to complaining were positively related to remaining loyal to the service provider for Australian and Malaysian students.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are limited to consumers of complex services such as University degrees. They are also limited to Indonesian, Malaysian and Australian consumers. Other service contexts, cultures and product failure situations should be investigated in the future.

Originality/value

This research bridges an inherent gap in the literature by exploring the complaining behavior of students in an Asia‐Pacific context. Service organisations can use the findings to better interpret and respond to complaining behavior by students from different nationalities. In particular, it helps faculty and university administrators to manage dissatisfied students from diverse national backgrounds and assists marketers to develop marketing initiatives and communication policies for the student recruitment process.

Details

Journal of International Education in Business, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-469X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 October 2009

Celso Augusto de Matos, Carlos Alberto Vargas Rossi, Ricardo Teixeira Veiga and Valter Afonso Vieira

The paper seeks to investigate, in a context of service failure and recovery, how consumer satisfaction is affected by problem severity and company responsiveness, how…

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Abstract

Purpose

The paper seeks to investigate, in a context of service failure and recovery, how consumer satisfaction is affected by problem severity and company responsiveness, how satisfaction influences repatronage intentions, word‐of‐mouth, and complaint intentions, and how consumer attitude toward complaining (ATC) moderates these relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

An integrated model is proposed, following recent developments in the service recovery literature. This model is tested using data from a survey with 204 complaining customers.

Findings

Service recovery affected satisfaction more strongly for consumers with high ATC, indicating a moderating role of ATC. This moderator was also supported in the link between satisfaction and complaining intentions. Also, failure severity and perceived justice influenced satisfaction, which affected repurchase intentions, word‐of‐mouth, and complaining intentions.

Practical implications

Service managers should consider the differences between customers with low versus high ATC when providing recovery for a service failure. For instance, the importance of responsiveness in service recovery is even greater for those customers with high ATC, and those customers with low ATC have their complaint decision more dependent on their satisfaction level. Also, it is important to improve the customers' perceived fairness in the complaint resolution process.

Originality/value

This paper investigates the key antecedents and consequences of satisfaction in a context of service failure and recovery by integrating previous research in a comprehensive model. ATC is proposed and tested as a moderator when complainers and non‐complainers are compared in the level of the strength of the relationships. Previous research has not found a moderation effect in this level.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 23 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 September 2020

Swapan Deep Arora and Anirban Chakraborty

This paper aims to provide an integrative view of the conceptualizations, definitions, antecedents and taxonomies of consumer complaining behavior (CCB). Additionally, the study…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide an integrative view of the conceptualizations, definitions, antecedents and taxonomies of consumer complaining behavior (CCB). Additionally, the study aims to provide an updated synthesis and classification of both legitimate and illegitimate CCB antecedents, as well as an integrated CCB taxonomy.

Design/methodology/approach

A multi-stage systematic search is conducted and 226 research articles relevant to the scope of the study are analyzed to fulfill the study’s objectives.

Findings

Through an exhaustive aggregation, legitimate and illegitimate CCB antecedents identified in the literature are collated and a classification schema is developed. Deficiencies observed in extant CCB taxonomies are addressed and a refined taxonomy incorporating illegitimate CCB is developed.

Research limitations/implications

The conclusions drawn on the basis of this paper are contingent on the effectiveness of the keyword-based systematic search process that is used to demarcate the extant literature.

Practical implications

This paper suggests a three-pronged approach of differential enabling, legitimacy evaluation and differential management. This holistic perspective aims at enabling firms to design complaint management policies and systems that control fake complaints while maintaining sufficient redress opportunities for genuine dissatisfaction.

Originality/value

The paper proposes an identical classification schema for legitimate and illegitimate CCB antecedents and is the first broad-based attempt to develop an integrated CCB taxonomy.

Abstract

Details

The Significance of Chinatown Development to a Multicultural America: An Exploration of the Houston Chinatowns
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80455-377-0

Article
Publication date: 28 October 2019

Marion Sangle-Ferriere and Benjamin G. Voyer

The development of self-service technologies, while intended to better serve customers by offering them autonomy, has created situations in which individuals may require…

Abstract

Purpose

The development of self-service technologies, while intended to better serve customers by offering them autonomy, has created situations in which individuals may require additional help. The purpose of this paper is to explore perceptions of chat as an assistance channel, to identify its perceived role in a customer service environment.

Design/methodology/approach

In all, 23 semi-structured interviews held with both chat and non-chat users assessed perceptions of chat in an assistance encounter. A thematic analysis was used.

Findings

The findings highlight a paradoxical perception of chat in a customer assistance context. On the one hand, customers perceive live chat as mainly beneficial in a customer service context, alleviating embarrassment, perceived threats and potential dissatisfaction linked to assistance requests. On the other hand, the elusive nature of a chat conversation interlocutor (human or artificial) adversely affects how customers interpret assistance from companies.

Research limitations/implications

This research underscores the perceived threats of assistance encounters and shows the ambivalent role of chat in such a context. It also highlights chat’s specific features that make it a relevant medium for assistance requests.

Practical implications

This study helps companies better understand customers’ perceptions of assistance requests and chat in that context. Companies can use the findings to develop better ways to address assistance needs and offer transparent and fully personalized human chat to provide an inclusive service.

Originality/value

This paper highlights the ambivalent role of chat as an assistance channel, easing assistance requests but also entailing a potential negative spillover effect, when negative chat perceptions of an artificial interlocutor have consequences.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 July 2014

Dewi Tojib and Saman Khajehzadeh

– This study aims to demonstrate that meta-perceptions play a contributing role in customers’ direct complaint intention.

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to demonstrate that meta-perceptions play a contributing role in customers’ direct complaint intention.

Design/methodology/approach

In an exploratory study, we identified different types of meta-perceptions. In a scenario-based experiment, we tested the interaction effect of service failure attribution and the perceived service failure severity on meta-perceptions and direct complaint intention.

Findings

After experiencing service failure, customers amplify both positive and negative meta-perceptions. Depending on how customers attribute the service failure and perceive the magnitude of service failure, they evaluate these meta-perceptions differently which then determine their subsequent actions.

Research limitations/implications

The use of hypothetical scenarios may not capture the richness of an actual service encounter. The study is limited to two service failure contexts: cable TV connection and restaurant booking.

Practical implications

Service managers should design marketing strategies that can elevate customers’ positive social image associated with voicing complaints.

Originality/value

This study offers a new explanation, in that some customers do not engage in direct complaining behavior owing to meta-perceptions that they develop during service failure.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 48 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 August 2019

Apiradee Wongkitrungrueng, Krittinee Nuttavuthisit, Teodora Szabo-Douat and Sankar Sen

The purpose of this paper is to explore the nature of customer deference to service providers in service encounters, and articulate its chief antecedents, experiences and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the nature of customer deference to service providers in service encounters, and articulate its chief antecedents, experiences and consequences.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected in Thailand, using critical incident technique. A total of 253 subjects share their experiences of being “deferential” (i.e. “kreng-jai” in Thailand) during everyday service encounters.

Findings

The findings indicate that in cultures in which the cultural norm (i.e. kreng-jai) is to be considerate of others, customers often become deferential of the service provider during service encounters, especially when customers perceive that the service provider’s well-being is compromised. However, customer deference involves aversive feelings which lead customers to devise coping strategies and avoid future contact with a company.

Research limitations/implications

Using a specific cultural norm, the findings challenge prior finding that people from collectivist culture are more likely to tolerate and be satisfied with service encounters, and document the role of previously unexamined customer-related factors in driving satisfaction in ordinary service encounters.

Practical implications

The findings recommend service providers to preempt customers’ deference by establishing and communicating the role and acceptable behaviors, managing physical distance with customers, and monitoring customer non-verbal behavior and facial expressions to detect the customers’ true feelings.

Originality/value

No prior research has comprehensively examined the phenomenon whereby consumers seek to benefit service providers at the expense of their own well-being. This study demonstrates that customer deference degrades customer satisfaction even in ordinary service encounters.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

Keywords

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