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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Fan-Chen Tseng, T.C.E. Cheng, Kai Li and Ching-I Teng

No studies in the extant literature have explored the role of media richness, i.e., the ability of media to enhance understanding among communication partners in a timely…

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2617

Abstract

Purpose

No studies in the extant literature have explored the role of media richness, i.e., the ability of media to enhance understanding among communication partners in a timely manner, in determining customer loyalty to mobile instant messaging (MIM). Grounded in media richness theory, the purpose of this paper is to examine how media richness influences customer perceived values, consequently contributing to customer loyalty to MIM.

Design/methodology/approach

Collecting data by an online survey, the authors apply partial least square procedures for hypothesis testing.

Findings

The authors obtain the following findings: multiple cues are positively related to functional value; immediate feedback is positively related to social value; personal focus is positively related to self-expressive value; language variety is positively related to all the above values that lead to user loyalty; and language variety has the strongest effect on user loyalty to MIM.

Originality/value

A first attempt to examine the impact of media richness on user loyalty to MIM, this study provides insights for MIM service providers to make decisions to build loyal user bases.

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2019

Fan-Chen Tseng, T.C.E. Cheng, Pei-Ling Yu, Tzu-Ling Huang and Ching-I. Teng

Mobile instant messaging (MIM) apps could provide rich and instant information in employees’ communication. However, how media richness impacts MIM user loyalty is…

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1039

Abstract

Purpose

Mobile instant messaging (MIM) apps could provide rich and instant information in employees’ communication. However, how media richness impacts MIM user loyalty is unknown. The purpose of this paper is to adopt media richness and social presence theories as theoretical foundations to address this insufficiency.

Design/methodology/approach

Collecting 247 responses from an online survey, the authors use structural equation modelling for data analysis and hypothesis testing.

Findings

The authors found that immediate feedback and personal focus are the main aspects of media richness that are positively related to social presence, relatedness need satisfaction and user loyalty to MIM.

Originality/value

This is the first study using two pertinent theories to explain how aspects of media richness affect user loyalty to MIM. The present findings suggest that firms developing MIM apps focus on immediate feedback and personal focus as effective means to encourage user loyalty.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 119 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 4 December 2017

Liuqing Yue, Yongmei Liu and Xuhua Wei

Against the background of industrialisation and modernisation of agriculture, food production issues and environmental hazards have become more and more obvious and…

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1470

Abstract

Purpose

Against the background of industrialisation and modernisation of agriculture, food production issues and environmental hazards have become more and more obvious and consumers are increasingly concerned about food safety and health, which is strengthening demand for organic food. E-commerce provides a new channel for sales. Research on consumer trust in online organic food sales is the basis of network marketing. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

A laboratory experiment was used to empirically test the effects of media richness on consumers’ trust and the moderating effect of online review length. A 2×2 factorial design (i.e. two types of online product presentation formats (between-subject)×two levels of online review lengths (between-subject)) was used.

Findings

Media richness has a significant positive effect on consumers’ trust and that this effect is moderated by online review length. Meanwhile, perceived risk conveys the interaction effect of the media richness of online product presentation and online review length to trust.

Practical implications

E-commerce websites should aim to promote organic food by using a variety of online product presentation formats and by presenting high quality online reviews in order to reduce consumers’ perceived risk and improve their degree of trust when buying online.

Originality/value

This paper provides a new insight into consumers’ attitude of buying organic food online. The results of the research could provide proposals for promoting organic food sales online.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 119 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 31 July 2009

Charles H. Cho, Jillian R. Phillips, Amy M. Hageman and Dennis M. Patten

The purpose of this paper is to determine whether the presentation medium of corporate social and environmental web site disclosure has an impact on user trust in such…

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5802

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine whether the presentation medium of corporate social and environmental web site disclosure has an impact on user trust in such disclosure, and to examine the effect of media richness on user perception about corporate social and environmental responsibility.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper's methodology is a three‐by‐two between‐subjects design experiment, manipulating presentation medium and industry type. Participants viewed social and environmental web site disclosures and completed and communicated their perceptions of trust and the experimental companies' corporate social responsibility.

Findings

The presentation medium richness of social and environmental web site disclosures is positively associated with: trusting intentions, but not trusting beliefs, of web site users; and user perception of corporate social and environmental responsibility.

Research limitations/implications

As with all controlled experiments, the research design focused on internal validity to maintain control over the task design, manipulation, and measurement of variables. While this required trade‐offs with external validity, the task was designed based on real‐world scenarios to maintain high levels of external validity within the experimental setting.

Practical implications

The paper provides evidence that corporations could use enhanced web‐based technology to potentially mislead users regarding their performance in the social domain.

Originality/value

The paper extends the visual disclosure literature by examining the richness of the image/visual media, and investigates whether user perceptions are impacted by the variations in its richness.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 22 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2014

Jessica M. Badger, Samuel E. Kaminsky and Tara S. Behrend

Rich, interactive media are becoming extremely common in internet recruitment systems. The paper investigates the role of media richness in applicants’ ability to learn…

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3506

Abstract

Purpose

Rich, interactive media are becoming extremely common in internet recruitment systems. The paper investigates the role of media richness in applicants’ ability to learn information relevant to making an application decision. The authors examine these relationships in the context of two competing theories, namely media richness theory and cognitive load theory, which predict opposite relationships with information acquisition. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants (n=471) either viewed a traditional web site or visited an interactive virtual world that contained information about an organization's culture, benefits, location, and job openings. Culture information was manipulated to either portray a highly teams-oriented culture or a highly individual-oriented culture.

Findings

Participants who viewed the low-richness site recalled more factual information about the organization; this effect was mediated by subjective mental workload. Richness was not related to differences in culture-related information acquisition.

Practical implications

These findings suggest that richer media (such as interactive virtual environments) may not be as effective as less rich media in conveying information. Specifically, the interactive elements may detract focus away from the information an organization wishes to portray. This may lead to wasted time on the part of applicants and organizations in the form of under- or over-qualified applications or a failure to follow instructions.

Originality/value

This study is among the first to use a cognitive load theory framework to suggest that richer media may not always achieve their desired effect.

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

Jill M. Purdy, Pete Nye and P.V. (Sundar) Balakrishnan

Our need to understand the impact of communication media on negotiation is growing as technological advances offer negotiators more communication options. As access to…

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3384

Abstract

Our need to understand the impact of communication media on negotiation is growing as technological advances offer negotiators more communication options. As access to technologies such as computer chat and videoconferencing increases, negotiators are choosing to use or to avoid these media without knowing the impact of their choices on negotiations. This research assesses objective and subjective negotiation outcomes, such as profit and outcome satisfaction, across four communication media with varying levels of media richness (face‐to‐face, videoconference, telephone, and computer‐mediated communication). A conceptual framework is offered to illustrate how media richness impacts objective and subjective outcomes. Results suggest that media richness affects required bargaining time, outcome satisfaction and the desire for future negotiation interaction. Thus, the communication media for negotiations should be chosen with care.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Article
Publication date: 22 October 2019

Gillian Moran, Laurent Muzellec and Devon Johnson

This paper aims to uncover the drivers of consumer-brand engagement on Facebook, understood here as users’ behavioral responses in the form of clicks, likes, shares and…

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2200

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to uncover the drivers of consumer-brand engagement on Facebook, understood here as users’ behavioral responses in the form of clicks, likes, shares and comments. We highlight which content components, interactivity cues (calls to action [CTA]) and media richness (e.g. video, photo and text) are most effective at inducing consumers to exhibit clicking, liking, commenting and sharing behaviors toward branded content.

Design/methodology/approach

This study analyzes 757 Facebook-based brand posts from a media and entertainment brand over a 15-week period. It investigates the relationship between interactive cues and media richness with consumer engagement using a negative binomial model.

Findings

Results show positive relationships for both interactivity cues and media richness content components on increasing consumer-brand engagement outcomes. The findings add clarity to previous inconsistent findings in the marketing literature. CTAs enhance all four engagement behaviors. Media richness also strongly influences all engagement behaviors, with visual imagery (photos and videos) attracting the most consumer responses.

Research limitations/implications

The sampled posts pertain to one brand (a radio station) and are thus concentrated within the media/entertainment industry, which limits the generalizability of findings. In addition, the authors limit their focus to Facebook but recognize that findings may differ across more visual or textual social networking sites.

Practical implications

The authors uncover the most effective pairings of media richness and interactivity components to trigger marketer-desired, behavioral responses. For sharing, for example, the authors show that photo-based posts are more effective on average than video-based posts. The authors also show that including an interactive call to act to encourage one type of engagement behavior has a near-universal effect in increasing all engagement behaviors.

Originality/value

This study takes two widely used concepts within the communications and advertising literatures – interactivity cues and media richness – and tests their relationship with engagement using real and actual users’ data available via Facebook Insights. This method is more robust than surveys or wall scrapping, as it mitigates Facebook’s algorithm effect. The results produce more consistent relationships than previous content marketing studies to date.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 29 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 20 August 2019

Sreejesh S., Juhi Gahlot Sarkar and Abhigyan Sarkar

The purpose of this paper is to examine the casual role of consumers’ perceptions of brands’ corporate social responsibility (CSR) motives (self-serving vs…

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1111

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the casual role of consumers’ perceptions of brands’ corporate social responsibility (CSR) motives (self-serving vs society-serving) in influencing consumer–brand relationships. Further, the authors explore the roles of brand initiated CSR activities (e.g. CSR co-creation), social media characteristics (e.g. media richness) and consumer’s community identification in shaping the effect of perceived CSR motive on consumer–brand relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

A 2 (CSR motives: self-oriented vs society-oriented) × 2 (CSR co-creation: yes vs no) × 2 (media richness: high vs low) between-subjects experimental design is employed.

Findings

The results elucidate that when consumers perceive that CSR is for self-serving (vs society-serving) motive, allowing consumers to co-create CSR in a high media-rich virtual platform enhances consumer–brand relationship quality. In addition, the results also support that the interactions of perceived CSR motives, co-creation and media richness enhance consumer–brand relationship through the mediation of community identification.

Originality/value

The current study draws implications for effective CSR co-creation through rich social media platforms, so as to enhance consumer–brand relationship quality via creating community identification.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2004

Steven John Simon and Spero C. Peppas

Internet2 research will lead to new technologies that will launch the Internet into another wave of unprecedented growth with enhanced interactivity and greater amounts of…

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3201

Abstract

Internet2 research will lead to new technologies that will launch the Internet into another wave of unprecedented growth with enhanced interactivity and greater amounts of information delivered via richer communication. As a result, Web‐based retailers must begin to rethink the design of their sites, the amount of information to provide, and the degree of media richness to deliver. Based on a large sample of managers, this study examines media richness theory in the context of simple and complex products. The findings suggest that, overall, Internet users have more positive attitudes and higher levels of satisfaction with regard to rich sites than to lean sites, although the results for simple product sites were inconclusive. The study discusses the impact of the results for both simple and complex products and details the development of a new experimental instrument to measure user attitudes and satisfaction.

Details

info, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

Kelly Burke, Kregg Aytes and Laku Chidambaram

Media richness theory argues that different media are more or less appropriate for different tasks. Social information processing theory (SIP) explains a motivation and…

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1750

Abstract

Media richness theory argues that different media are more or less appropriate for different tasks. Social information processing theory (SIP) explains a motivation and method guiding such technology adoption. In light of these theories, and the field’s lack of understanding of media effects on group development, this article investigates the development of two important group process factors – cohesion development and process satisfaction – in two different studies of groups supported by electronic meeting systems. Results indicate that initial levels of cohesion and process satisfaction differ depending on the medium (and its inherent richness) and, consistent with SIP, cohesion and process satisfaction increase over time in all types of electronic support, despite relative differences in media richness.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

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