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Book part
Publication date: 26 November 2018

Pooja B. Vijayakumar, Michael J. Morley, Noreen Heraty, Mark E. Mendenhall and Joyce S. Osland

In this contribution, we systematically review the extant global leadership literature to identify important bibliometric and thematic patterns in evidence in this…

Abstract

In this contribution, we systematically review the extant global leadership literature to identify important bibliometric and thematic patterns in evidence in this evolving field of scholarship. Conceptualizing the phenomenon to include leaders/managers/supervisors who hold global, expatriate, or international positions, we draw out insights accumulated from a total of 327 published articles in key management and organizational behavior journals listed in Scopus. Our analysis proceeds in two sequential phases. Our bibliometric analysis first identifies the most cited articles, most published first authors, country bases of first authors, and frequently publishing journals in this field. This characterizes both the diversity and innovative nature of scholarship in the field. Our thematic content analysis, generated through Nvivo 11, isolates two dominant overarching themes that represent the wellspring for the body of literature, namely global leader development and global leader effectiveness. These themes of development and effectiveness are further explicated through six distinct lenses namely cultural, cognitive, learning, personality trait, social/relational, and political. These lenses are underpinned by a suite of theoretical perspectives encompassing individual, system, and contextual considerations. In combination, these sets of analyses bring added systematics to the field and serve as a point of departure for future inquiry.

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Advances in Global Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-297-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2000

Mary Beth Stanek

Multinational corporations need to recognize the importance of international management development. Formal human resource programs, tied to business objectives, need…

Abstract

Multinational corporations need to recognize the importance of international management development. Formal human resource programs, tied to business objectives, need to be established. Ignoring the importance of global management development leads to missed market opportunities. Understanding and support at the executive level is a necessity. Human resource information systems need to include international data elements to help in the identification of candidates. Training budgets have to shift course work from a domestic focus to multicultural and international marketplace issues. The home and host managers must agree to the objectives for the employee prior to the assignment start. Repatriation assignments must align with the experience.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 38 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Book part
Publication date: 19 October 2020

Natalia Fey

International experience (IE) has been acknowledged to be the most useful method for developing global leaders. However, not everyone benefits equally from IE. During the…

Abstract

International experience (IE) has been acknowledged to be the most useful method for developing global leaders. However, not everyone benefits equally from IE. During the last two decades, our understanding of why this is the case and how global leaders learn from IE has rapidly increased. Several individual and organizational enablers facilitating global leader learning from IE have been identified in the literature, as have learning mechanisms that make such learning possible. However, the literature remains fragmented, and there is a great need to integrate the findings in the field. Therefore, the present paper systematically examines peer-reviewed studies on global leaders' learning from IE published between 1998 and 2019. The study contributes to the extant literature by identifying and integrating individual enablers, organizational enablers, and key learning mechanisms from global leaders' IE and by suggesting topics for future research.

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Article
Publication date: 27 January 2012

Neal Goodman

The purpose of this paper is to examine the best ways for an organization to instil cultural intelligence and international success in to its workforce.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the best ways for an organization to instil cultural intelligence and international success in to its workforce.

Design/methodology/approach

Possible methods examined include highly tailored cross‐cultural curricula, virtual training, global leadership programs, international team building exercises, and knowledge management systems. The recommendation and analysis of these methods is based on 25 years of Global Dynamics experience in training executives in cross‐cultural skills.

Findings

The author's research has found that complete implementation of the recommended methods result in optimal performance in a global market. Making employees aware of their own cultural perspectives and misunderstandings enables the development of a larger world view. Leadership involvement in the direction of organization's cultural competence strategy helps employees hone their skills on specific points of emphasis. Additionally, metrics should be used to gauge the effectiveness of the cultural intelligence strategy in order to continually improve elements of the overarching program.

Practical implications

By having more direct involvement in the learning process, leadership can strengthen the organization's cultural intelligence and ensure that the learnings are directly applicable.

Originality/value

This paper is based on more than 25 years of experience working with the world's leading international organizations to enhance their global performance.

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Article
Publication date: 20 August 2018

Robert W. Robertson

The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the “skills gap” concerns that are increasingly prevalent in the USA and globally. In particular, the paper explores…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the “skills gap” concerns that are increasingly prevalent in the USA and globally. In particular, the paper explores the current skills gap debate as a component of the American economy. This is an important issue as there is an increased economic uncertainty and global competition impacting many sectors. The paper specifically defines the current skills gap dilemma with respect to the USA and uses the Tampa, FL example of the practical implications of these concerns using recent survey and focus group data.

Design/methodology/approach

The research for this paper includes an outline of the economic development structures in place in Tampa, FL, a description of the existing mandate(s) to improve workforce training; the review of a key recent, public record report on workforce skills; and, the results of a focus group developed using key stakeholders. Initially, a public record document report titled Clarus Corporation (2013) “Hillsborough Community College: Workforce Development Scan” was reviewed to provide context and preliminary data to guide the research. In the second phase, a survey was conducted to develop a focus group of 18 key stakeholders in Hillsborough County. Nine of these stakeholders represented the education sector. These were purposefully selected from the Tampa Bay Higher Education Alliance (TBHEA) which represents approximately 30 regionally accredited academic institutions in the Tampa community (TBHEA, n.d.). In addition, another nine respondents were selected by purposeful selection representing employers who had experience with workforce training and development initiatives.

Findings

The group survey conducted for this paper confirms concerns by both employers and educators with respect to the existing and the future skill sets of employees. In particular, respondents note that basic skills such as communication and technical skills need more attention. Also, the focus group respondents confirm the importance of technical service certification. Fundamentally, economic development professionals, educators and employers need to develop and implement strategies and action plans to ensure that the skills gap be identified correctly and properly addressed. These initiatives must be developed with broad stakeholder input and these initiatives must be viewed as dynamic reflecting changing circumstances.

Research limitations/implications

This research should be viewed as exploratory in nature. The research could serve as a template to develop and track the concerns and issues of key stakeholders in the economic development process with respect to skills in the workforce on a regional or indeed a statewide basis.

Practical implications

Nations, states and local governments are more active in structuring workforce development support mechanisms and specific training opportunities to assist employees and businesses. All levels of government highlight the fact that they have skilled, competitive employees to assist in recruiting new companies to consider locating in their respective jurisdictions and in retaining companies.

Social implications

Having a clear understanding of the skills being demanded by employers as they strive to remain globally competitive is important. Local economic development officials, academicians and employers must be on the same page. Although relationships between these sectors are critical flexibility and adaptability are key to reflect changing demands.

Originality/value

The paper provides empirical evidence of the perceptions employers and educators have with respect to the skills gap issue in a fast growth jurisdiction. This jurisdiction promotes itself as having an abundant and skilled labor force. Data suggest that there are some concerns emerging from stakeholders.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

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Book part
Publication date: 23 July 2019

Claretha Hughes, Lionel Robert, Kristin Frady and Adam Arroyos

Many factors may influence the training and development of middle-skill, low-skill, and disadvantaged workers. Within the United States and worldwide there are many…

Abstract

Many factors may influence the training and development of middle-skill, low-skill, and disadvantaged workers. Within the United States and worldwide there are many middle-skilled, low-skilled, and disadvantaged workers whom training and development professionals must consider as organizations seek to expand their workforce and increase productivity using technology. Temporary agencies employ many middle-skilled, low-skilled, and disadvantaged workers; however, there is very little information regarding how effective these agencies are in developing these workers beyond the skill level with which they enter the agency.

Details

Managing Technology and Middle- and Low-skilled Employees
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-077-7

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Abstract

Details

Advances in Global Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-479-4

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1991

M. Domsch and B. Lichtenberger

While foreign trade and joint ventures between Germany and thePeople′s Republic of China and Brazil have grown considerably, many ofthe attempts at economic co‐operation…

Abstract

While foreign trade and joint ventures between Germany and the People′s Republic of China and Brazil have grown considerably, many of the attempts at economic co‐operation have collapsed. One major explanation can be attributed to cultural differences between German expatriate managers and their local subordinates. Therefore predeparture training and development becomes more significant. This study investigates the extent and significance of predeparture training and development for expatriates in China and Brazil in German companies. When, how often and which strategies are used to prepare the expatriate for his/her assignment in an effective and efficient way? It raises some important questions on the appropriate strategy in international human resource management.

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Journal of Management Development, vol. 10 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Book part
Publication date: 19 October 2020

Mark Frederick

This reflection on the trajectory of the field of Global Leadership Development identifies shifts from in-person training to virtual coaching leveraging assessment tools…

Abstract

This reflection on the trajectory of the field of Global Leadership Development identifies shifts from in-person training to virtual coaching leveraging assessment tools. Practitioners can now choose from a wide variety of assessments and learning systems, identified herein, to structure coaching over time in an online environment. Based on decades of experience, the author explains how to select an assessment and incorporate it into one's developmental approach. This chapter also clarifies how to structure coaching and effectively deliver virtual sessions. Several examples from leading companies illustrate how these best practice approaches can be built into global leadership development initiatives.

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Book part
Publication date: 6 May 2004

Shreya Sarkar-Barney

The focus of global training has primarily been on preparing employees to work effectively in other cultures, such as in expatriate training, acculturation training, and…

Abstract

The focus of global training has primarily been on preparing employees to work effectively in other cultures, such as in expatriate training, acculturation training, and training for technology transfer. One issue that has been ignored is the implication of using training systems that are developed in a specific cultural context and then deployed globally. This chapter proposes a framework to show the influence of culture on one aspect of training effectiveness, the transfer of newly learned skills to the job. Specific relationships are proposed, using Baldwin and Ford’s (1988) transfer of training framework as a guide, and also by synthesizing findings from areas such as cross-cultural psychology, human resource management, education, and technology management.

Details

Cultural Ergonomics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-049-4

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