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Book part
Publication date: 30 July 2018

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Marketing Management in Turkey
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-558-0

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1993

Andreas Kelz and Brian Bloch

Examines the motivation for and the benefits of a global brandingstrategy, and sets out a framework for its implementation. Discusses theinternational environmental…

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2476

Abstract

Examines the motivation for and the benefits of a global branding strategy, and sets out a framework for its implementation. Discusses the international environmental circumstances conducive to global branding, analyses the major functions and benefits of the strategy – advertising cost savings, rapid introduction of product innovation and improved identification and motivation of the workforce with the enterprise. Finally deals with the organizational conditions for global branding, such as strategic planning and controlling, organizational anchoring and marketing research. Draws on both English and German management literature.

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Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 93 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 15 October 2019

Keshab Ray and Meenakshi Sharma

There is a lacuna in research work in terms of understanding how Indian IT organizations can become global brands. Benchmarking has not received much attention in…

Abstract

Purpose

There is a lacuna in research work in terms of understanding how Indian IT organizations can become global brands. Benchmarking has not received much attention in marketing literature due to lack of benchmarking framework, and IT organizations are yet to make progress in benchmarking. The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of brand strength on global branding by developing a conceptual benchmarking framework for Indian IT organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured in-depth interviews are conducted with thirty middle-level managers from two Indian IT organizations, two US-based global IT organizations and one UK-based leading bank, which is a customer of these IT organizations.

Findings

Results show a positive relationship between brand strength and global branding, between customer loyalty and global branding, between brand loyalty and competitive advantage and between global branding and competitive advantage. Indian IT organizations can benchmark global IT organizations to improve delivering brand promise, positioning, awareness building and authenticity toward making Indian IT organizations future ready to address the entire breadth of opportunities in the evolving world of cloud and digital.

Practical implications

This research helps managers with a brand strength-based benchmarking framework toward global branding of Indian IT organizations.

Social implications

IT is instrumental for rapid growth of Indian’s economy. India should optimally utilize its greatest wealth, its human potential, with the latent global demand in IT through building global IT brands.

Originality/value

The originality of the study lies in conducting a qualitative study on global branding of Indian IT organizations and also proposing a conceptual benchmarking framework. The study further validates the model using qualitative analysis.

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Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article
Publication date: 20 March 2017

Brendon Knott, Alan Fyall and Ian Jones

Sport mega-events have received much criticism of late. However, there has been increasing awareness of the brand-related benefits from hosting a sport mega-event, with…

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4358

Abstract

Purpose

Sport mega-events have received much criticism of late. However, there has been increasing awareness of the brand-related benefits from hosting a sport mega-event, with their hosting being a deliberate policy for many nations, most notably among emerging nations. One such nation is South Africa, which explicitly stated its nation branding ambitions through the staging of the 2010 FIFA World Cup. Through this single case, this paper aims to identify the unique characteristics of the sport mega-event that were leveraged for benefits of nation branding.

Design/methodology/approach

An interpretivist, qualitative study explored the insights of nation brand stakeholders and experts, elicited using in-depth, semi-structured interviews (n = 27) undertaken two to three years after the staging of the event.

Findings

Three characteristics of the 2010 sport mega-event were deemed by stakeholders to be unique in creating nation branding opportunities: the scale of the event that created opportunities for transformational development; the global appeal, connection and attachment of the event; and the symbolic status of the event that was leveraged for internal brand building and public diplomacy. The paper proposes that while sport mega-events provide nation branding opportunities, the extent of these benefits may vary according to the context of the nation brand with lesser-known, troubled or emerging brands seemingly having the most to gain.

Originality/value

While acknowledging the critique of mega-events, this paper highlights a pertinent example of an emerging nation that leveraged the potential of a sport mega-event for nation branding gains. It extends the understanding of sport mega-events and their potential for nation branding.

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International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 20 September 2011

Hsiu Ying Huang and Ming Huei Hsieh

The purpose of this study is to explore and conceptualize the process of how an emerging‐market firm develops a successful international brand.

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2939

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore and conceptualize the process of how an emerging‐market firm develops a successful international brand.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative case study approach was employed in this study. Two rounds of data collection were conducted. Data sources include archival, interview and field notes. A total of 13 in‐depth interviews were conducted. Interviewees were drawn from across different functions and comprised top management to lower‐level employees. Collected data were analyzed in the iterate process, and emergent themes from the case form the basis of strategy conceptualizing.

Findings

An effective international branding process can be conceptualized as four sequential strategic steps: create a transcultural brand name; identify a universal appeal for its products; develop a global brand essence; and convey the brand essence through products. The case finding also shows that the ability to fuse three pairs of seemingly contrasting elements across geographical and temporal boundaries is essential in the strategic process. The three pairs of elements include Western and Eastern cultures, historical and modern elements and craftsmanship and mass‐production.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is rich in qualitative detail, but with all single case study research, its limitations regard applicability to other contexts. The applicability may suffer from the idiosyncratic characteristics of the case company as well as the difference between industries and products.

Practical implications

The finding provides insights into how an emerging‐market firm can craft its international brand both faster and more effectively. The identified international branding process has managerial implications for international marketers in both emerging‐market and non‐emerging‐market firms.

Originality/value

The study fills the void in the research of international branding strategy of emerging‐market firms. The conceptualization of an international branding provides a basis for further research on how to effectively craft an international brand.

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Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 29 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 16 July 2020

Haemoon Oh, Misoon Lee and Seonjeong Ally Lee

This study aims to investigate how and why traveling consumers choose globally branded/operated, instead of locally branded, hotels when traveling to another country.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate how and why traveling consumers choose globally branded/operated, instead of locally branded, hotels when traveling to another country.

Design/methodology/approach

Building on signaling theory, the authors conceptualize a model to explain the consumer process of selecting global hotel brands and test the model empirically with South Korean international consumers through a self-administered survey.

Findings

The data support the relationships of selected brand signals, such as brand credibility, brand liability, decision heuristic and anticipated satisfaction, with brand attitude and purchase likelihood.

Practical implications

The results imply how global hotel brand managers could enhance the effect of global hotel branding on the consumer’s hotel choice.

Originality/value

The study adds to the literature by proposing a new, empirically supported model of global branding for the tourism and hospitality industry.

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Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 18 April 2008

Dennis A. Pitta and Frank J. Franzak

This paper seeks to explore the relationship between global brands and the emotional connections between consumers and the brand.

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4642

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to explore the relationship between global brands and the emotional connections between consumers and the brand.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper integrates concepts including a range of recently published (1995‐2006) theoretical works in the branding, global branding, and share of heart literature.

Findings

The paper provides information and action approaches to marketers to aid them in managing the emotional ties of global brands to specific market segments. The term “global brand” is used extensively in business but its nature and scope are not understood by all. Global brands are few in number and must satisfy several criteria to be considered truly global. This study explores the requirements for global branding as well as the characteristics and advantages of global brands. Brands may be considered in two dimensions based on their acceptance by consumers. One dimension is the brand's deliverable benefits relevant to its target segment. The other is the type and depth of emotional connection between the consumer and the brand. The article reviews the state of global branding and types of emotional connections. It then postulates a series of actions to build share of heart to aid in taking brands global.

Research limitations/implications

The theoretical concepts that form the foundation of the paper appear to have a significant application to consumer marketing but have not been tested empirically.

Practical implications

The paper explores a global phenomenon that has implications for the nature and scope of market segmentation, product design and promotion.

Originality/value

The paper describes the nature and application of emotional connections to particular brands. While most literature has concentrated on local or national brands, the paper provides a perspective that may help to understand how global brands generate emotional ties to consumers.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 29 May 2009

Michael Polonsky and Colin Jevons

There is general agreement that global brands should ensure that they incorporate social responsibility. To do this properly, organisations must understand what it means…

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15752

Abstract

Purpose

There is general agreement that global brands should ensure that they incorporate social responsibility. To do this properly, organisations must understand what it means to be socially responsible and how they can leverage their actions. The paper proposes consideration of three distinct areas: the range of social responsibility issues, what the organisations actually do and how to leverage those corporate social responsibility (CSR) actions. This paper seeks to conceptually develop these three areas of complexity – Issue, Organisational and Communication – as it is only after organisations understand these three areas that they can effectively leverage socially responsible activities in their brands.

Design/methodology/approach

This research undertakes a review and synthesis of the academic, practitioner and industry literature examining CSR and the brand, addressing the three areas of complexity – issue, organisational and communication.

Findings

The research finds that within these three areas of complexity there are a number of sub‐issues that must be addressed if CSR is to be strategically integrated into a global brand. This includes sub‐issues associated with social issue complexity (identification, heterogeneity, measurement, and interpretation); organizational complexity (overall corporate brand, multiple products and brands, functional activities, and supply chain); and communication complexity (intensity of action/positioning, communicating action, types of programs utilised, and integration issues.) It thus provides an agenda for future research.

Research limitations/implications

There is limited academic literature examining how global organisations incorporate CSR activities into their brand and the research proposes the issues that need to be considered when integrating CSR into branding strategy. Future research needs to be undertaken to explore the internal processes that global firms use to develop their CSR positioning strategies and some research propositions for future research are proposed. Additionally further exploration of each of the issues (and sub‐issues) identified in this paper is warranted, and some suggestions are made for this.

Practical implications

The results of this study show that developing a CSR leveraged brand in a consistent way that is salient to all stakeholders is no simple task for global organisations. By considering the three areas of complexity developed here organisations will be able to better understand and align their activities in line with CSR related issues. Being global means that organisations will likely need to ensure they address the highest set of global expectations, as any lower level may be criticised as being less than appropriate.

Originality/value

The paper develops the sub‐issues of issue, organisational and communication complexity associated with global brands' CSR activities. This strategic perspective goes beyond focusing on the tactical activities undertaken or the philosophical issue of whether CSR should be undertaken. The work therefore allows global organisations to look at CSR more strategically as a branding issue.

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International Marketing Review, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Book part
Publication date: 21 August 2012

Hannah S. Lee and David A. Griffith

This study examines the process of establishing a viable brand in a new foreign market through successful market entry governance by utilizing various types of branding

Abstract

This study examines the process of establishing a viable brand in a new foreign market through successful market entry governance by utilizing various types of branding alliances to transfer corporate brands. Drawing from corporate illustrations and building upon Ghosh and John's (1999) governance value analysis (GVA) model, a decision model for managers is developed providing theory-based guidance for market entry strategies. Relational governance can be considered as a continuum ranging from strong relational (i.e., joint ventures, co-branding) to weak relational (i.e., joint promotion, marketing alliance) forms. Firms should organize their market entry strategy based upon brand equity resources, specific investments made by the partner, and environmental uncertainty (market volatility and cultural distance), so as to transfer the desired brand image and associations into local markets by maximizing the level of value created and value claimed. This study contributes to the international marketing literature by providing a theoretically strong decision model, supported by corporate examples, of how firms enter markets using various types of brand alliances. It also advances the practice of international marketing in regard to branding by providing insights as to how managers in the global marketplace can effectively transfer brand images and build global brand equity, minimizing firm costs while maximizing the value created and claimed from the brand.

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Interdisciplinary Approaches to Product Design, Innovation, & Branding in International Marketing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-016-1

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Article
Publication date: 3 January 2020

Eric Ping Hung Li, Hyun Jeong Min and Somin Lee

The purpose of this paper is to explore the interconnection between the corporatisation of K-beauty and Korea’s nation branding exercise and its links with soft power…

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1259

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the interconnection between the corporatisation of K-beauty and Korea’s nation branding exercise and its links with soft power. Through the investigation of the transformation of Korea’s beauty industry, the authors seek to illustrate the inter-relationship of the market systems and national identification practices.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employed the qualitative case study approach to examine the latest development of Korea’s medical tourism. Through analysing a variety of secondary data that associated to the latest development of cosmetic tourism, this paper presents the impact of the transformation and reconfiguration of Korea’s beauty industry on the country’s nation branding strategy and the development of Korea’s soft power in the global marketplace.

Findings

The findings highlight how Korea’s new cosmetic tourism industry contributed to the renewal of Korea’s nation brand in the global market. The findings also illustrate the interconnection of the emerging Korean popular cultural products (K-pop and K-beauty) in the regional and global marketplace.

Research limitations/implications

The findings demonstrate the role of market in re-defining a nation’s brand and identity. The findings also illustrate how market-driven strategy influences the development of a nation’s soft power in the regional and/or global marketplace.

Practical implications

The study shows that practitioners can be active agents in nation branding. Through highlighting strategies to develop soft power within and beyond the country boundary, this study shows how market agents, governments and other stakeholders can co-create a market system that transform and reconfigure the nation brand in the global marketplace.

Social implications

In additional to explore the transformation of the beauty industry in Korea, this paper also presents the history and transformation of the beauty standards in Korea and other Asian cultures. Such dialogue invites marketing and consumer researchers to further explore the role of history and culture in guiding the production and consumption of new (consumption) standards.

Originality/value

This is the first paper that connects the theory of soft power in nation branding and country-of-origin literature. The case analysis of the socio-historical development of K-beauty also demonstrates how non-Western cultural goods enter the international marketplace. In summary, this paper provides new conceptual framework that illustrates a new collaborative mechanism that engages government and practitioners to co-create new cultural norms and standards to the local and international markets.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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