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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2001

George Lorenzo

With more than 2,300 educational centers providing a comprehensive range of IT education in 30 countries world‐wide – and adding more centers at a rate of about 20 per month – New…

361

Abstract

With more than 2,300 educational centers providing a comprehensive range of IT education in 30 countries world‐wide – and adding more centers at a rate of about 20 per month – New Delhi, India‐based NIIT is a company that’s obviously worth noting in the world of transnational education.

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On the Horizon, vol. 9 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2001

George Lorenzo

News piece about how the INTI international Group of Colleges in Malaysia has expanded into China, Thailand, Indonesia and Vietnam.

157

Abstract

News piece about how the INTI international Group of Colleges in Malaysia has expanded into China, Thailand, Indonesia and Vietnam.

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On the Horizon, vol. 9 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2001

George Lorenzo

NextEd, an international education and training infrastructure company started in 1998, with offices in Australia, China, Hong Kong and Malaysia, currently has business…

127

Abstract

NextEd, an international education and training infrastructure company started in 1998, with offices in Australia, China, Hong Kong and Malaysia, currently has business relationships with 25 higher education institutions and commercial training providers located throughout the world.

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On the Horizon, vol. 9 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2001

William E. Halal

People sense that the world is passing through a profound transformation, but they badly need convenient, reliable information to guide their understanding and decisions. For the…

Abstract

People sense that the world is passing through a profound transformation, but they badly need convenient, reliable information to guide their understanding and decisions. For the past ten years my colleagues and I have filled this need using an online system that pools the knowledge of experts to forecast emerging technologies – the GW Forecast.

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On the Horizon, vol. 9 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2001

Marc Prensky

Part 2 of Prensky’s paper exploring the differences between “digital natives” and “digital immigrants”. In this second part the author presents evidence to support these…

20396

Abstract

Part 2 of Prensky’s paper exploring the differences between “digital natives” and “digital immigrants”. In this second part the author presents evidence to support these differences from neurology, social psychology and from studies done on children using games for learning.

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On the Horizon, vol. 9 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2001

Marc Prensky

Part one of this paper highlights how students today think and process information fundamentally differently from their predecessors, as a result of being surrounded by new…

96470

Abstract

Part one of this paper highlights how students today think and process information fundamentally differently from their predecessors, as a result of being surrounded by new technology. The author compares these “digital natives” with the older generation who are learning and adopting new technology naming them “digital immigrants”.

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On the Horizon, vol. 9 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2000

Stephen Brown

Just prior to the recent millennial transition, The Observer polled a cross‐section of British celebrities about their perceptions of paradise. Most of these were suitably vague …

3125

Abstract

Just prior to the recent millennial transition, The Observer polled a cross‐section of British celebrities about their perceptions of paradise. Most of these were suitably vague – perpetual joy, renewed relationships, blissful state of mind etc. – but the anarchic comedian Mark Thomas archly described Heaven as “smelling of bananas”. Off‐hand possibly, flippant undoubtedly, yet Thomas’s remark is strikingly apt, since bananas are the original “forbidden fruit” of the Garden of Eden. Apples are mere interlopers, latter‐day arrivistes that have prospered thanks to the spin‐doctoring tactics of the wily Serpent. This paper, therefore, aims to set the record straight by telling a tall banana tale and explaining how bananamarketing is the future of our field.

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Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 18 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1952

Since March 16th the ban on the use of soya in the manufacture of sausages has been removed. The lifting of this restriction, which has been in force since 1946, will be welcomed…

Abstract

Since March 16th the ban on the use of soya in the manufacture of sausages has been removed. The lifting of this restriction, which has been in force since 1946, will be welcomed by some manufacturers who claim that soya is an excellent binding agent. We are doubtful, however, whether these sentiments will be shared by all public analysts, many of whom are of the opinion that the presence of soya in a sausage renders the determination of the meat content if not wholly impossible at best a series of long and tedious processes, the accuracy of which would seem to be a matter of some controversy. Upon our enquiry about this divergency of opinion to the Ministry of Food, we were told that the Ministry were quite satisfied that the new Order could be properly enforced, in other words we assume this to mean that they consider the presence of soya does not prevent the accurate determination of the meat content. This was the answer one would expect to receive from the authority who framed the Meat Products Order, but it is none the less surprising to recall that only a very short while ago the Ministry were of the reverse opinion. In May 1950 a report was published in this Journal of a case heard before Old Street Magistrates. The defendants were summoned under The Meat Products, Canned Soup and Canned Meat (Control and Maximum Prices) Order, 1946, for selling sausages which contained soya. The Order stated that no persons should manufacture or sell any sausage, slicing sausage or sausage meat which to his knowledge contained any soya product. The prosecuting solicitor, for the Ministry of Food, said that it was necessary under the Order of 1946 for sausages to contain a minimum meat content, and if soya flour were used to bind the sausage it was not possible upon analysis to determine the meat content. It would be interesting to know whether the results of research during the past two years have made available new and efficient methods of examination which justify this change of viewpoint. We are advised, however, that if soya is present the amount of meat cannot be accurately assessed, and, moreover, the percentage error of this determination is likely to be directly related to the percentage of soya in the sausage. Thus it would seem possible that this new piece of legislation provides an added incentive to an unscrupulous manufacturer to prepare his mix with a lower meat content than that prescribed and to make up the balance with soya: a practice which would enable him to make more sausages than his honest competitor, and which would probably be difficult to expose.

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British Food Journal, vol. 54 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Abstract

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A History of the Assessment of Sex Offenders: 1830–2020
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-360-9

Case study
Publication date: 20 January 2017

S. Venkataraman, George (Yiorgos) Allayannis and Gerry Yemen

“Suitable for MBA, Executive MBA, GEMBA, and executive education programs, this case uses CEMEX, a global cement producer based in Mexico, to set the stage for unfolding an…

Abstract

“Suitable for MBA, Executive MBA, GEMBA, and executive education programs, this case uses CEMEX, a global cement producer based in Mexico, to set the stage for unfolding an analysis of a growth through acquisition strategy. It offers a discussion about the firm's overall strategy to acquire on a global scale instead of growing organically and provides an opportunity to introduce basic financial, marketing, and operational terms that can be explored in subsequent classes. The material includes a PMI process that further allows discussion on that technique.

The case opens with a conference call and another barrage of questions for CEO Lorenzo Zambrano about his bid to buy the Australia-based Rinker Group in October 2006. Until this point, CEMEX has had a long-standing habit of buying businesses in emerging markets; this acquisition would be a departure from that strategy. If the deal goes through, it would be the single largest acquisition in CEMEX's history, and it would be among its few forays into a developed market other than the neighboring United States. The company has grown exponentially and successfully. Why would this effort be any different? Was the acquisition a good idea or not? And if it was, how would Zambrano and his leadership team convince Wall Street and others of that?”

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