Search results

1 – 10 of 37
Open Access
Article
Publication date: 16 December 2021

Ferry Koster

Studies of inter-organisational relationships have mainly investigated collaborations in the technical domain. There is considerably less research conducted in the field…

Abstract

Purpose

Studies of inter-organisational relationships have mainly investigated collaborations in the technical domain. There is considerably less research conducted in the field of inter-organisational collaborations in the domain of human resource management (HRM). At the same time, it is acknowledged that inter-organisational collaboration in this domain is relevant for organisations. By focusing on inter-organisational HR collaborations, this study provides insights into how these collaborations are governed, as well as how the mode of governance is explained.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper relies on a quantitative study among 161 Dutch companies that collaborate with each other on HR-related issues. A measure of governance of inter-organisational HR collaboration is developed and applied.

Findings

Organisations tend to apply a mixture of governance mechanisms to govern their inter-organisational HR collaborations. Hence, they apply a collaborative community type of governance to these HR collaborations. The analyses show that the level of knowledge intensity, in particular the extent to which the organisation applies organisational learning practices, explains the use of collaborative community.

Originality/value

First, this study focuses on an under-researched field: inter-organisational HR collaborations. Secondly, the study extends existing insights into the governance of inter-organisational relationships by analysing a novel data set.

Details

Journal of Work-Applied Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2205-2062

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 16 September 2020

Ferry Koster and Luc Benda

External factors such as global competition and new technologies, require organizations to be innovative. Such organizational innovations also ask for innovative human…

Downloads
5299

Abstract

Purpose

External factors such as global competition and new technologies, require organizations to be innovative. Such organizational innovations also ask for innovative human resource management (HRM). However, in the current literature, it is not completely clear what innovative HRM means, as it is conceptualized in different ways. This study aims to provide clarity about innovative HRM by suggesting a new measurement scale; formulating hypotheses about some core determinants of innovative HRM; and investigating how innovative HRM relates to organizational innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a sample of 719 Dutch organizations it was possible to investigate the properties of the inventory and examining several determinants of innovative HRM and how it relates to organizational innovation.

Findings

The innovative HRM scale is internally consistent and differs from other HRM indicators. It is explained by external developments, organizational size and stability of the organization. Finally, innovative HRM is a predictor of organizational innovation.

Originality/value

The measure that was developed in this paper is new to the literature. Innovative HRM has not been measured in a similar way to date. Besides that, the innovative HRM Survey is a novel data set.

Details

International Journal of Innovation Science, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-2223

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 7 July 2020

Conny J.J. Roobol and Ferry Koster

The purpose of this study is to examine the role of organisational conditions and workplace characteristics in midcareer and senior employees’ intention to volitionally…

Downloads
1397

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the role of organisational conditions and workplace characteristics in midcareer and senior employees’ intention to volitionally provide career support to junior organisational members, their protégés.

Design/methodology/approach

Hypotheses are tested using multilevel linear modelling on a heterogeneous sample of Dutch employees ages 29 to 69 who participated in a vignette study in the autumn of 2017.

Findings

In line with the hypotheses, the findings of this study show that volitional (informal) mentoring is positively related to an organisation’s endorsement of intrinsic values (e.g. learning opportunities) and negatively to the presence of hindrance demands (e.g. time pressure).

Practical implications

Practitioners could facilitate co-mentor consultation, employ autonomy-supportive direct supervisors and fulfil psychological contract obligations by providing job security and learning opportunities. Organisations could also lower time pressures through job carving.

Originality/value

This study extends extant mentoring research by combining insights from perceived organisational support (POS) and self-determination theory (SDT) to examine the role organisational conditions and workplace characteristics play in aiding or hindering volitional mentoring. It enriches extant knowledge management studies on the link between organisational aspects and (intended) knowledge sharing behaviour by showing that similar organisational motivators predict volitional mentoring, thereby launching a call to study knowledge management through volitional mentoring using a SDT- and POS-based lens. A methodological novelty is the reliance on a vignette study.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 24 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 4 December 2017

Ferry Koster and Maria Fleischmann

Previous research leads to contrasting hypotheses about the relationship between extra effort of employees and the level of job security. According to agency theory, job…

Abstract

Purpose

Previous research leads to contrasting hypotheses about the relationship between extra effort of employees and the level of job security. According to agency theory, job security leads to lower levels of extra effort and social exchange theory argues that extra effort requires job security. The purpose of this paper is to formulate a set of hypotheses based on these theories. Besides considering them as mutually exclusive, they are integrated into a single theoretical framework that argues that both theories can apply, depending on the conditions and social context (in terms of the social security system).

Design/methodology/approach

Data from the International Social Survey Program (2005) including 22 countries from around the globe are analyzed using multilevel analysis.

Findings

The study provides evidence that social security moderates the relationship between job security and extra effort.

Originality/value

This study differs from previous research as it focuses on two sides of insecurity in the workplace and because it analyzes a large data set to include institutional factors.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 37 no. 13/14
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Ivan Pouwels and Ferry Koster

This paper aims at integrating previous studies investigating the relationship between inter-organizational cooperation and organizational innovation. Earlier research…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims at integrating previous studies investigating the relationship between inter-organizational cooperation and organizational innovation. Earlier research provides mixed results regarding this relationship. In this paper, it is argued that this may be because of an empirical bias in these studies, as they tend to focus on one sector, one type of innovation or one country. Using a cross-national comparative data set enables to account for these potential biases and establish the relationship between inter-organizational cooperation and organizational innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

The study examines the effect of inter-organizational cooperation on product, process, organizational and market innovation, using data from 32 European countries and 6 different sectors (n = 27,019). The data are analyzed using logistic regression analysis.

Findings

The analysis shows that there is a positive relationship between inter-organizational cooperation and organizational innovation, even when controlled for common innovation variables including general characteristics, organizational structure, organizational culture, HR strategies, networking interaction and external knowledge acquisition.

Originality/value

In contrast to most prior studies that rely on data from one sector, one country and one innovation type, this study examines the relationship between inter-organizational cooperation and organizational innovativeness by taking into account multiple sectors, countries and types of innovation. This intends to generate more robust results regarding the link between inter-organizational cooperation and organizational innovativeness.

Details

International Journal of Innovation Science, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-2223

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 24 January 2019

Luc Benda, Ferry Koster and Romke J. van der Veen

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how active labour market policy (ALMP) training programmes and hiring subsidies increase or decrease differences in the…

Downloads
1709

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how active labour market policy (ALMP) training programmes and hiring subsidies increase or decrease differences in the unemployment risk between lesser and higher educated people during an economic downturn. A focus is put on potential job competition dynamics and cumulative (dis)advantages of the lesser and higher educated.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses multi-level data. The fifth wave (2010) of the European Social Survey was used and combined with macro-level data on labour market policies of the OECD. The sample consisted of 18,172 observations in 19 countries.

Findings

The results show that higher levels of participation and spending on training policies are related to a smaller difference in the unemployment risks of the educational groups. Higher training policy intensity is associated with a lower unemployment risk for the lesser educated and a higher unemployment risk for the higher educated. This implies that the lesser educated are better able to withstand downward pressure from the higher educated, thereby, reducing downward displacement during an economic downturn. Hiring subsidies do not seem to be associated with the impact of education on unemployment.

Originality/value

The paper adds to the discussion on ALMP training and hiring subsidies that are primarily rooted in the human capital theory and signalling theory. Both theories ignore the social context of labour market behaviour. The job competition theory and cumulative (dis)advantage theory add to these theories by focussing on the relative position of individuals and the characteristics that accompany the social position of the individual.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 39 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Ferry Koster and Rafael Wittek

The purpose of this paper is to investigate three distinct hypotheses about the relationship between human resource (HR) practices (discretion and skill enhancement) and…

Downloads
1546

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate three distinct hypotheses about the relationship between human resource (HR) practices (discretion and skill enhancement) and the level of trade openness and foreign direct investments of countries.

Design/methodology/approach

The study applies multilevel analysis using data of 16,701 employees living in 23 European countries.

Findings

Based on the multilevel analysis mixed support is found for the hypothesis stating that economic openness is curvilinearly related (an inverted U) to the use of HR practices. While this holds for discretion, it does not for skill enhancement.

Originality/value

While economic globalization is often mentioned as an important factor in understanding organizational relations, there have only been few international comparative studies explicitly linking measures of economic openness and HR practices. This study investigate whether economic globalization is important or not.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 38 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 9 January 2007

Ferry Koster, Frans Stokman, Randy Hodson and Karin Sanders

The aim of this paper is to investigate the effects of task and informal networks and their interaction on cooperative types of employee behaviour.

Downloads
2550

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to investigate the effects of task and informal networks and their interaction on cooperative types of employee behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

Two studies are used to examine the research question. The first dataset consists of book‐length ethnographies providing information at the team level. The second dataset is gathered through a survey across ten different organisations and provides information at the employee level. Both datasets are analysed using OLS regression.

Findings

Cooperative behaviour is positively affected by task and informal interdependence relationships. However, when employees have task and informal interdependence relationships with co‐workers, they may show less cooperative behaviour.

Research limitations/implications

A major limitation of this study is that it was not possible to include information about the structure of the networks in which the employees are embedded. The study provides evidence for the existence of exchange relationships between the employee and the team. Besides that, the study shows the importance of including formal and informal networks to study cooperative behaviour of employees.

Practical implications

The findings provide practical information about how to manage cooperation within teams. Cooperative relationships can be created by either creating task or informal interdependence. Besides that, managers should strike a balance between task and informal interdependence.

Originality/value

Existing research tends to focus on the effects of one type of network on behaviour. This research shows that different networks may affect employee behaviour at the same time.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 25 November 2013

Maria Münderlein, Jan F. Ybema and Ferry Koster

This paper aims to provide an empirical test of theories proposed in the literature stating that turnover and retirement (two kinds of work withdrawal) involve different…

Downloads
1706

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide an empirical test of theories proposed in the literature stating that turnover and retirement (two kinds of work withdrawal) involve different employee decisions. It also aims to provide a more general theoretical framework understanding turnover and retirement intentions integrating insights from different theories.

Design/methodology/approach

Research hypotheses are tested using the Study on Transitions in Employment, Ability and Motivation (STREAM). This dataset includes information from approximately 15,000 respondents in The Netherlands. Respondents between the age of 45 and 64 were the target group in order to model transitions in the labor market for older workers. This dataset provides a unique opportunity to test turnover and retirement intentions.

Findings

First, the results show that personal characteristics such as income, age or health, add more to the explanation of retirement intentions compared to turnover intentions and that work characteristics provide a better explanation of the turnover intention compared to retirement intention. Second, by focusing more closely on retirement intentions, the results show that organizational motivators can increase older workers' labor market participation.

Research limitations/implications

First, it is acknowledged that the study investigates intentions rather than actual behavior. Second, given that the data are cross sectional, we cannot make claims about causality. Finally, some of the measures can be improved in future studies.

Originality/value

This paper aims at integrating different perspectives on two kinds of work withdrawal (turnover and retirement) into one theoretical model.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 18 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 3 August 2015

Klarita Gërxhani and Ferry Koster

The purpose of this paper is to investigate employers’ recruitment strategies to address distinct job-related agency problems before establishing an employment…

Downloads
9982

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate employers’ recruitment strategies to address distinct job-related agency problems before establishing an employment relationship. Insights from agency theory and the social embeddedness perspective are combined to hypothesize whether and why employers adapt their recruitment strategies to the job type (differing in level of discretion) for which they are externally hiring.

Design/methodology/approach

The hypotheses are empirically tested using data from a survey of 288 Dutch employers. Questions were asked about the two types of jobs. Multi-level logistic regression analysis is applied to investigate the effect of social context on the choice of recruitment strategy. In addition to that, separate analyses are conducted for the two job types, using logistic regression analysis.

Findings

As predicted, employers have the tendency to use informal recruitment channels more often for jobs with high degree of discretion (i.e. managerial, professional, and specialists jobs (MPS)) than for jobs with low degree of discretion (i.e. administrative and supporting jobs). In addition, the type of information transmitted through employers’ social contacts matters for their recruitment strategies. In particular, the reliable and trustworthy information from contacts with friends and family is more important for MPS jobs. This seems to be the way employers deal with the high agency costs characterizing this type of jobs.

Originality/value

This study extends prior research as follows. First, while earlier studies more closely looked at why organizations use formal or informal recruitment, this study specifically focusses on the role the job type plays in the hiring process. Second, it provides an extension of agency theory by including job type in the analyses. And, third, the study examines how the networks of employers, rather than employees, affect the hiring process.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 44 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

1 – 10 of 37