Search results

1 – 10 of over 7000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 21 June 2011

Hajar Sotudeh

The purpose of this study is to attempt to suggest an adjustment in Iran's national publication strategy based on the country‐specific Matthew core journals. It…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to attempt to suggest an adjustment in Iran's national publication strategy based on the country‐specific Matthew core journals. It investigates Iran's performance in its national journal set, and proposes a more prominent journal subset.

Design/methodology/approach

A citation analysis method is applied to study Iran's scientific performance in its national journal set. The data were extracted from the Science Citation Index at Web of Science and JCR and imported to SPSS for further refinement and analysis.

Findings

The results showed that Iran experienced comparatively considerable citation loss. Surplus citations are concentrated in a small number of journals, presented as Iran's positive Matthew core journals. The results also confirm a relatively poor publication strategy adopted by Iranian scientists and that a publication concentration does not necessarily enhance the chance of being widely cited.

Research limitations/implications

These findings imply that Iran needs to watch more vigilantly the functioning of its science system. To improve its presence at the international level, Iran should re‐orient its publication strategy towards a more prominent one. This may be the case for similar science systems, where the emphasis is given to quantity rather than quality.

Originality/value

Country‐specific Matthew core journals, with serious citation competition, can serve as an important criterion to monitor the functioning of science systems regarding publication strategy. This is the first empirical study to employ the concept to suggest improvements in a country's publication strategy.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 August 2004

Thomas Li‐Ping Tang, David Shin‐Hsiung Tang and Cindy Shin‐Yi Tang

This research employs institutional characteristics and market‐related factors to predict undergraduate students' tuition at 190 private colleges and universities in the…

Abstract

This research employs institutional characteristics and market‐related factors to predict undergraduate students' tuition at 190 private colleges and universities in the USA. Results showed that the strongest correlations among variables for college tuition were reputation ranking and SAT scores. Results of a hierarchical multiple regression revealed that the type of institution, academic reputation ranking, the annual expenditures, geographic region, the existence of professional schools, the size of the faculty and the undergraduate student body, and university presidents' pay and benefits are all significant predictors of college tuition. After controlling all other variables, the unique contribution made by reputation ranking is still a significant predictor of college tuition. Research institutions charged their students more than liberal arts colleges, which, in turn, charged more than doctoral granting I institutions. Implications for parents and students, private colleges and universities, human resource management, and the Matthew effect are discussed.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 18 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 15 July 1991

Abstract

Details

Advances in Librarianship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-12024-615-1

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 September 2020

Jeff Muldoon

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the debate initiated by the “historic turn.” This debate has seen several rebuttals of the methodologies and conceptual…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the debate initiated by the “historic turn.” This debate has seen several rebuttals of the methodologies and conceptual frameworks advocated by proponents of the “historic turn” including ANTi-History. In contributing to this debate, this paper provides a discussion on some of the ongoing debates within the field. The purpose is to neither condemn nor defend – but to clarify and find points of agreement.

Design/methodology/approach

The design implied is an overview of some of the themes in the field – locating key concepts of agreement and key aspects of disagreement.

Findings

There is a middle ground between the two schools. One is a continued focus on primary sources, the use of new methodologies, understanding context and some new approaches. We must carefully consider context and text and limit the use of concepts that have real limitations.

Originality/value

This is an overview of the field by someone who was considered a critic of the new history. The purpose is to find middle ground.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 10 June 2021

Rajesh V. Srivastava and Thomas Tang

In an ongoing War for Talent, what are the intangible and tangible return on investments (ROIs) for boundary-spanning employees? This study aims to develop a formative…

Abstract

Purpose

In an ongoing War for Talent, what are the intangible and tangible return on investments (ROIs) for boundary-spanning employees? This study aims to develop a formative structural equation model (SEM) of the Matthew effect in talent. management.

Design/methodology/approach

This study develops a formative SEM theoretical model. Training and development (T&D) are the two antecedents of the latent construct – talent management strategy (TMS). This study frames the latent construct (TMS) in the proximal context of reducing burnout (cynicism and inefficacy), the distal context of subjective and intangible outcomes (job and life satisfaction) and the omnibus context of objective, tangible and financial rewards (the sales commission). The study collected data from multiple sources – objective sales commission from personnel records and subjective survey data from 512 sales employees.

Findings

The empirical discoveries support the theory. Both T&D contribute significantly to the TMS, which reduces burnout in the immediate context. TMS enhances job satisfaction more than life satisfaction in the distal context. TMS significantly and indirectly improves boundary spanners’ sales commission in the omnibus context via life satisfaction, but not job satisfaction. The model prevails for the whole sample, men, but not women.

Practical implications

Our discoveries offer practical implications for the Matthew effect in talent management: policymakers must cultivate T&D, develop TMS, facilitate the spillover effect from job satisfaction to life satisfaction, concentrate on the meaning in their lives and take their mind off money. TMS ultimately helps ignite these boundary spanners’ sales commission and their organization’s bottom line and financial health. The rich get richer.

Originality/value

It is life satisfaction (not job satisfaction) that excites boundary-spanning employees’ high level of sales commission. Our model prevails for the whole sample and men, but not for women. Job satisfaction spills over to life satisfaction for the entire sample, for men, but not for women. The results reveal gender differences.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 13 April 2010

Rati Ram

The purpose of this paper is to study the cross‐country relation between initial levels of infant‐, child‐ and maternal‐mortality and their rates of decline so as to see…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the cross‐country relation between initial levels of infant‐, child‐ and maternal‐mortality and their rates of decline so as to see whether the so‐called Matthew effect or the inverse‐care principle operates relative to these three important health indicators.

Design/methodology/approach

Data on the three variables for a large number of countries covering several periods between 1950 and 2007 are considered. Signs and significance of correlations between initial levels and the rates of decline over the period, and of coefficients of initial levels in regressions of rates of decline on the initial level, are studied.

Findings

First, in a broad global context, higher initial levels of mortality are associated with significantly lower rates of decline in each of the three indicators for every period, thus providing strong support to the operation of the inverse‐care principle and the Matthew effect. Second, the high‐income countries (and transition economies) deviate from the global pattern. Third, following Hart's suggestion, the parametric contrast between the high income and the developing groups may be interpreted as indicative of stronger government intervention in the healthcare sector in high‐income countries. Fourth, the contrast may thus indicate the desirability of greater government intervention in provision of healthcare in developing countries. Fifth, operation of the inverse‐care principle and the Matthew effect is observed even in the absence of high‐HIV prevalence. Sixth, the observed negative covariation between initial mortality and its rate of decline implies cross‐country divergence in these core indicators of health.

Originality/value

First, this is the only study to investigate the operation of the inverse‐care principle relative to infant mortality for such a large number of countries and such a long period. Second, it is also the only study to extend the investigation to child‐mortality and maternal‐mortality, which are heavily emphasized in the millennium development goals. Third, the patterns are studied not only merely for the entire set of countries, but also for several subgroups. Fourth, the observed parametric contrasts are interpreted as possibly reflecting the importance of government intervention in the healthcare sector in mitigating the operation of the inverse‐care phenomenon. Fifth, an effort is made to factor out the role of HIV so as to show that the pattern is not significantly altered by high prevalence of HIV in poor countries. Sixth, the implied cross‐country divergence in these important health variables is suggestive of the need for caution in interpreting the conclusions stated by some scholars about convergence in several quality‐of‐life indicators. Last, contrary to what some scholars have suggested, not merely does it not seem to be the case that the inverse‐care proposition relative to infant mortality is observed only in exceptional cases, but the reported evidence suggests that the proposition holds globally over long periods even for child‐ and maternal‐mortality.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 37 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 1996

Christopher P. Neck and Arthur G. Bedeian

In an effort to give credit where credit is due, recounts J. Maunsell White III’s role in the development of the Taylor‐White process for treating tool steel. A…

Abstract

In an effort to give credit where credit is due, recounts J. Maunsell White III’s role in the development of the Taylor‐White process for treating tool steel. A contemporary and colleague of Frederick W. Taylor, “The Father of Scientific Management”, White offers a classic example of the so‐called Matthew Effect, in which recognition accrues to those of considerable repute and is withheld from those who have not yet made their mark.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-252X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 23 May 2008

Judith Licea de Arenas, Miguel Arenas, Sergio Márquez and Catalina Pérez

The purpose of this paper is to profile the prizewinners of the most prestigious award in Mexico, the National Prize for Sciences and the Arts and the Emeritus…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to profile the prizewinners of the most prestigious award in Mexico, the National Prize for Sciences and the Arts and the Emeritus Professorship awarded by the National University of Mexico.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws upon data retrieved from the Web of Science (1995‐2006).

Findings

The 68 laureates published 1,175 papers and received a total of 13,443 citations. The most productive scientists were in the age group 65‐69, while those over 75 years of age were the least productive as well as the less cited. Most prizewinners have at least 35 years' experience scientists, who have been active as researchers for 30‐39 years, were the most productive and the most cited.

Research limitations/implications

Results presented in this paper could complement other indicators of research performance used to determine the visibility of Mexican science, research institutions and individuals and whether resources and influence should be distributed more equitably. The operationalization of the Matthew effect could be minimized if awards committees were to correlate bibliometrics with the peer review process in order to reward the most creative researchers.

Originality/value

The paper focuses on research performance of Mexican academics.

Details

Library Review, vol. 57 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 1987

Magdeleine Moureau

The cost of online bibliographic searching depends on how it is done. What is paid is the means and not the result. Yet there is no correlation between the price of the…

Abstract

The cost of online bibliographic searching depends on how it is done. What is paid is the means and not the result. Yet there is no correlation between the price of the means and the value of the result. To achieve a satisfactory balance between means and results as well as a good quality/price ratio, an attempt must be made to optimise searching along the following two axes: the strategic approach and the conceptual approach. But the elements that have to be taken into consideration are rarely known by the occasional user. This is why a new category of specialist has come into being, i.e. the systems expert, who knows everything about all the databases and search procedures. The more online searches he makes, the more skilled he becomes and the more he is asked to make, whereas the occasional user moves in the opposite direction (‘Mattheweffect).

Details

Online Review, vol. 11 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-314X

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 14 January 2021

Cassandra R. Davis, Sarah R. Cannon and Sarah C. Fuller

The purpose of this paper is to identify and describe the long-term impacts of hurricanes on schools and discuss approaches to improving recovery efforts.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify and describe the long-term impacts of hurricanes on schools and discuss approaches to improving recovery efforts.

Design/methodology/approach

Interviews with 20 school districts in Texas and North Carolina after Hurricanes Harvey (2017) and Matthew (2016). In total, 115 interviews were conducted with teachers, principals, district superintendents and representatives from state education agencies. Interview questions focused on the impact of storms and strategies for recovery.

Findings

The authors uncovered three long-term impacts of hurricanes on schools: (1) constrained instructional time, (2) increased social-emotional needs and (3) the need to support educators.

Research limitations/implications

This paper focuses on two storms, in two states, in two successive years. Data collection occurred in Texas, one academic year after the storm. As compared to the North Carolina, data collection occurred almost two academic years after the storm.

Practical implications

This paper illuminates strategies for stakeholders to implement and expedite hurricane recovery through; (1) updating curricula plans, (2) providing long-term counselors and (3) supporting educators in and out of school.

Originality/value

To date, very few studies have explored the ways in which schools face long-term impacts following a disaster. This paper provides insight to the challenges that prolong the impacts of disasters and impede recovery in schools. With hurricanes and related disasters continuing to affect schooling communities, more research is needed to identify the best ways to support schools, months to years after an event.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 7000