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Article
Publication date: 27 April 2020

Hongyi Mao, Shan Liu, Jinlong Zhang, Yajun Zhang and Yeming Gong

Scholars have examined the possible relationship between information technology (IT) and organizational agility. Although the general-level effect of IT is undisputed…

Abstract

Purpose

Scholars have examined the possible relationship between information technology (IT) and organizational agility. Although the general-level effect of IT is undisputed, empirical research on how different types of IT contribute to various aspects of organizational agility remains scarce. Therefore, this study aims to propose an integrated framework of internal capability and external environment to address this research gap.

Design/methodology/approach

This study investigates the potential mediating effects of absorptive capacity and the moderating effects of information intensity in the IT‒agility relationship. With a dataset comprising 165 organizations in China, this work provides empirical evidence that the effects of absorptive capacity and information intensity are multifaceted and nuanced, thereby revealing the latent mechanisms of IT competency and organizational agility.

Findings

Absorptive capacity partially mediates the effects of IT knowledge and IT operations on market capitalizing agility and fully mediates their effects on operational adjustment agility. However, no direct or indirect effects of IT objects are found on both types of organizational agility. Information intensity also positively moderates the effects of IT operations and IT objects on absorptive capacity. However, no significant moderation is found with regard to IT operations.

Originality/value

This study provides novel insights by demonstrating clearly the different mediating roles of absorptive capacity in the relationship among various types of IT competency and diverse aspects of organizational agility. This work also underscores the moderating role of information intensity in shaping absorptive capacity through IT competency.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 31 May 2011

Jalil Heidary Dahooie, Abbas Afrazeh and Seyed Mohammad Moathar Hosseini

This study attempts to identify the different types of activities that comprise a worker's job, and provide a framework for quantitative definition and segmentation of

Abstract

Purpose

This study attempts to identify the different types of activities that comprise a worker's job, and provide a framework for quantitative definition and segmentation of knowledge works (KWs).

Design/methodology/approach

Every KW has two main parts: working with knowledge and establishing communication. Thus, in order to provide an exact definition for the KW it is necessary to calculate the knowledge intensity score of a job (JKIS) and communication intensity score of a job (JCIS). For determining these two parameters precisely, jobs were broken hierarchically to tasks and then activities. To identify these activities, an initial list of activities mentioned in the literature was created and then completed with generalized work activities of O*NET. A six‐step framework for calculating of JKIS and JCIS was proposed and finally, different groups of knowledge workers (KWrs) with respect to JKIS and JCIS were identified by using a clustering method.

Findings

This article shows how KW can be defined and segmented based on two dimensions (i.e. knowledge intensity score of a job (JKIS) and communication intensity score of a job (JCIS)). The proposed framework was used to analyze 133 jobs in 11 organizations. Practicality and validity of framework were examined based on this empirical study.

Research limitations/implications

This study is a base for the identification of appropriate managerial frameworks corresponding to each discovered group of KWrs. Using more data can improve the results obtained in this study.

Practical implications

This work emphasizes the importance of defining and clustering KW and proposes a practical method for this aim.

Originality/value

A new framework for the quantification of KW is proposed. This framework is supported by five principles inferred from the literature.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 25 October 2011

Tatiana Andreeva and Aino Kianto

The purpose of this paper is to examine innovation from a knowledge‐based view by exploring the effect of knowledge processes and knowledge intensity on innovation performance.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine innovation from a knowledge‐based view by exploring the effect of knowledge processes and knowledge intensity on innovation performance.

Design/methodology/approach

First, a theoretical model of the connections between knowledge processes, knowledge intensity and innovation performance is presented. The posited hypotheses are then tested statistically, using a survey dataset of 221 organizations.

Findings

The result shows that while all knowledge processes have a beneficial impact on innovation, knowledge creation impacts innovation the most and fully mediates the impact of knowledge documentation, intra‐organizational knowledge sharing and external knowledge acquisition on innovation performance. Furthermore, knowledge intensity increases all knowledge processes. Knowledge intensity also moderates the relationship of documentation and knowledge sharing with knowledge creation. The interaction effect is negative, meaning that firms in less knowledge‐intensive conditions will benefit more from documentation and knowledge sharing for their knowledge creation purposes, and ultimately innovation.

Research limitations

The data are limited to companies from Finland, Russia and China.

Practical implications

To promote innovation, managers should pay close attention to knowledge creation processes in organizations. Furthermore, knowledge creation can be facilitated by ensuring efficient documentation procedures, and internal and external knowledge sharing and acquisition practices. Documentation and knowledge sharing are especially effective means to promote knowledge creation for non‐knowledge intensive firms.

Originality/value

This paper makes a contribution to the existing literature by building and testing a knowledge‐based model of firm innovation and articulating the inter‐relations of knowledge processes and knowledge intensity with innovation performance.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 15 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 17 October 2008

Yuri W. Ramirez and Harry J. Steudel

The purpose of this paper is to present the knowledge work (KW) quantification framework – a mathematical model to quantify KW. The framework calculates a knowledge work…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the knowledge work (KW) quantification framework – a mathematical model to quantify KW. The framework calculates a knowledge work score (KWS) that positions each worker in the KW continuum.

Design/methodology/approach

The framework states that KW is a continuum and that eight KW dimensions can be used to differentiate between manual and KW. A methodology was developed that follows a series of steps to calculate the KWS. Operational definitions are presented and explained.

Findings

By assigning a knowledge work intensity score to the tasks a worker does, the knowledge work quantification framework (KWQF) calculates the intensity score for the job hence an intensity score for the worker. KWSs are calculated for two example jobs to illustrate the KWQF and the allocation of the jobs in the KW continuum.

Research limitations/implications

Since there have been no previous studies like this, it is difficult to compare results. A larger sample of workers for different work types would provide more data points in the KW continuum. Other limitations are discussed in the paper.

Practical implications

The knowledge worker (KWr) has become the predominant type of worker in today's economy. With most of manual work being researched and optimized, it is in scientifically improving our understanding of the KWr where the opportunities for improving productivity lie.

Originality/value

In the past, the field has lacked a scientific approach and has been studies more in terms of opinions and theories rather than an empirical research frame of mind. This paper is the first attempt to create a methodology that quantifies KW.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2002

Tammy L. Madsen, Elaine Mosakowski and Srilata Zaheer

This empirical paper investigates the relationships between the amount of human capital that flows into a firm and two activities underlying a firm’s knowledge production…

Abstract

This empirical paper investigates the relationships between the amount of human capital that flows into a firm and two activities underlying a firm’s knowledge production, variation or change and knowledge retention. We track the flow of human capital within and across organizational and geographic space for all multi‐unit banks operating in the world foreign exchange trade industry from 1973 to 1993. The findings indicate that an increased reliance on past experience reduces how much human capital a firm imports in the future. This effect is moderated by a self‐reinforcing cycle of human capital inflow. Inflows of human capital also decline when a firm has recently adopted novel changes in its operations. The paper uses evolutionary thinking to define a model for intrafirm knowledge production.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 July 2020

Halimin Herjanto and Muslim Amin

The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of appearance, lifestyle and status similarity on interaction intensity, satisfaction with a banker and…

Abstract

Purpose

The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of appearance, lifestyle and status similarity on interaction intensity, satisfaction with a banker and repurchase intention. Also examined was the moderating effect of client knowledge in the enhancement of customer satisfaction with a banker.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 800 questionnaires using the snowball sampling technique were performed to distribute the questionnaires to bank customers at different ethnic community centers in New Zealand. A total of 377 useable questionnaires were collected for further analysis.

Findings

The findings indicated that the three types of similarity affect interaction intensity differently. Lifestyle similarity was found to positively influence interaction intensity. The similarity constructs of appearance and status were found to have an insignificant relationship with interaction intensity. The findings show that appearance similarity and interaction intensity are able to enhance customer satisfaction with a banker. Customer satisfaction with a banker has a significant relationship with repurchase intention. Client knowledge influences the degree of interaction intensity and satisfaction with a banker.

Practical implications

The findings of this study help bankers to understand the importance of their similarities with a customer and to design recruitment strategies and training sections to improve customer satisfaction.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the body of knowledge by incorporating interaction intensity, similarity and satisfaction with a bank into the repurchase intention model.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 38 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Article
Publication date: 24 May 2013

Rong‐ying Zhao and Bi‐kun Chen

An enterprise social network (ESN) is part of the landscape of information reform by enterprises, using Web 2.0. In terms of the marketing targets of typical Web 2.0

Abstract

Purpose

An enterprise social network (ESN) is part of the landscape of information reform by enterprises, using Web 2.0. In terms of the marketing targets of typical Web 2.0 techniques, enterprise knowledge sharing in Web 2.0 can be classified into different types (individual interaction type, group interaction type, social interaction type, real‐time interaction type and delay interaction type). The purpose of this paper is to summarize the features and modes of different enterprises' knowledge sharing and study enterprise knowledge sharing quantitatively from an ESN perspective by selecting real‐time interaction type as the case.

Design/methodology/approach

Because of the area of research, the authors supplemented social network analysis (SNA) with a mathematical modeling method and additional in‐depth interviews.

Findings

The Web 2.0 era provides the opportunity to quantify knowledge sharing. Also, SNA can quantitatively and visually diagnose the knowledge sharing status of the enterprise and guide the enterprise's knowledge‐sharing process.

Research limitations/implications

Only a case study regarding real‐time interaction type is presented; other types of interaction are not studied empirically.

Practical implications

SNA, combined with a mathematical modeling method and additional in‐depth interviews with team leaders or key managers in organizations, can diagnose quantitatively, visually and comprehensively the knowledge‐sharing status of the enterprise.

Originality/value

This paper systematically summarizes the features and modes of Web 2.0 enterprise knowledge sharing, and the multiple‐method research design represents a sound approach to targeting enterprise knowledge sharing.

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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2015

Kurmet Kivipõld

The purpose of this paper is to explore how organizational leadership capability as a knowledge coordinating mechanism affects service organization activities towards…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how organizational leadership capability as a knowledge coordinating mechanism affects service organization activities towards different stakeholder groups.

Design/methodology/approach

The subjects in the case study are four Estonian service companies from the banking and retail industry providing high- and low-skill services, respectively. The data for the study were collected using the Organizational Leadership Capability Questionnaire with a total of 375 employees as respondents, and the organizations’ web sites to analyse corporate social responsibility (CSR). Assessment and analysis of the data included: the measurement of organizational leadership capability; the measurement of CSR communication; and analysis of the results gained from studying issues pertaining to organizational leadership capability as a knowledge coordination mechanism and innovative behaviour in terms of CSR.

Findings

Ultimately, the study reveals that organizations with higher intensity of knowledge use in high-skill service industries have greater ability to coordinate knowledge as expressed in terms of organizational leadership capability, which in turn, allows them to behave more innovatively in terms of CSR towards stakeholders.

Research limitations/implications

This study suggests that innovative behaviour in organizations towards different groups of stakeholders depends on organizational leadership capability. However, the results of this study are only valid in the context of the Estonia service sector, and more precisely the retail and banking industry.

Originality/value

This paper demonstrates the role of organizational leadership capability in the coordination of knowledge to generate innovative behaviour in terms of CSR in service organizations.

Details

Baltic Journal of Management, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5265

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Article
Publication date: 13 May 2021

Aswini Kumar Mishra, Abhishek Kumar Sinha, Abhijeet Khasnis and Sai Theja Vadlamani

This paper aims to analyse the impact of innovation on the productivity of firms in India using the data from the World Enterprise Survey. This paper first classifies…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to analyse the impact of innovation on the productivity of firms in India using the data from the World Enterprise Survey. This paper first classifies three different types of innovation measures then further analyses their relation with the productivity of the firms.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology used for this study has incorporated the structural Crépon-Douget-Mairesse (CDM) model wherein productivity is measured using both the innovation inputs and the innovation outputs. Three main equations have been used to quantify this relation includes the knowledge intensity function, innovation function and the productivity equation.

Findings

Findings indicate that decision to invest in research and development (R&D) is influenced negatively by financial obstacles and trade obstacles and positively influenced by telecommunication obstacles, government obstacles and the size of the firm in India. Similarly, financial obstacles and the size of the firm are affecting the firm’s research expenditure per employee. Also, financial obstacles seem to hinder the research intensity and larger firms seem to have higher research intensity. The size of the firm contributes significantly to product innovation. However, R&D spending seems to be negatively related to the innovation outcome. The findings relating to productivity shows neither product nor process innovation outputs, independently are not contributing significantly to the productivity of firms. However, product and process innovation, together serve as innovation outputs is a significant contributor to firm productivity. On the other hand, organisational innovation contributes significantly to the productivity of the firms in a negative manner.

Originality/value

The findings relating to productivity shows neither product nor process innovation outputs, independently are not contributing significantly to the productivity of firms (which has been measured by sales per worker is impacted by the capital and the labour inputs). However, product and process innovation, together serve as innovation outputs is a significant contributor to firm productivity. On the other hand, organisational innovation contributes significantly to the productivity of the firms in a negative manner. The reason could be due to the fact that the definition of organisational innovation incorporates both dissolutions and mergers.

Details

International Journal of Innovation Science, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-2223

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2018

Khalid Hafeez, Fathalla M. Alghatas, Pantea Foroudi, Bang Nguyen and Suraksha Gupta

The purpose of this paper is to examine how entrepreneurs engage in a virtual community of practice (VCoP) to share knowledge. Intensity of engagement is taken as a proxy…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how entrepreneurs engage in a virtual community of practice (VCoP) to share knowledge. Intensity of engagement is taken as a proxy to measure the strength of knowledge sharing.

Design/methodology/approach

The archival data spanning over a three-year period from “Start-up-Nation©” (a VCoP purposefully setup for entrepreneurs) are used for analysis. A set of indices are introduced to measure participants’ intensity of engagement in terms of message length, message frequency and reciprocity in the knowledge sharing process. Content analysis is employed to test a sample of “highly engaged”, “moderately engaged”, “low engaged” and “not engaged” discussion topics as part of the online discourse.

Findings

The authors find that entrepreneurs normally use short (fewer than 100 words) or medium (fewer than 250 words) message size to contribute to the discussions. In addition, the authors find that senior members and discussion moderators play important roles in igniting the “reciprocity” behaviour in stimulating the interest of the community with the topic discussion. The authors also find that highly engaged topics usually lead to further discussion threads.

Originality/value

This is the first study of its kind to explore how entrepreneurs engage in a VCoP to share their knowledge and experiences. The set of measurement indices tested here provide a tool for the owner, designer and moderator of the VCoP to measure the utility of their website in terms of its members’ participation. In addition, the set of textual and subjective interventions identified here enables the moderator (administrator) of a VCoP to design effective interventions to facilitate online discourse and augments the knowledge sharing process amongst its community members.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

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