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Open Access
Article
Publication date: 11 October 2022

Titay Zeleke, Fekadu Beyene, Temesgen Deressa, Jemal Yousuf and Temesgen Kebede

Change of climate is attributed to human activity that alters the composition of the global atmosphere observed over comparable periods. The purpose of this paper is to explore…

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Abstract

Purpose

Change of climate is attributed to human activity that alters the composition of the global atmosphere observed over comparable periods. The purpose of this paper is to explore smallholder farmers' perceptions of climate change and compare it with meteorological data, as well as to identify perceived adaptation barriers and examine the factors that influence the choice of adaptation options in eastern Ethiopia.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 384 sample households were chosen from four districts of the zone. A cross-sectional survey was used to conduct the study. Primary data was acquired through key informant interviews, focus group discussions and semistructured interviews, whereas meteorological data was collected from the National Meteorological Service Agency of Ethiopia. A Mann–Kendall statistical test was used to analyze temperature and rainfall trends over 33 years. A multivariate probit (MVP) model was used to identify the determinants of farmers' choice of climate change adaptation strategies.

Findings

The result indicated that temperature was significantly increased, whereas rainfall was significantly reduced over the time span of 33 years. This change in climate over time was consistently perceived by farmers. Smallholder farmers use improved varieties of crops, crop diversification, adjusting planting dates, soil and water conservation practices, reducing livestock holdings, planting trees and small-scale irrigation adaptation strategies. Moreover, this study indicated that sex of the household head, landholding size, livestock ownership, access to extension, access to credit, social capital, market distance, access to climate change-related training, nonfarm income, agroecological setting and poverty status of the households significantly influence farmers’ choice of adaptation strategies.

Research limitations/implications

Further research is required to evaluate the economic impact of each adaptation options on the livelihood of smallholder farmers.

Practical implications

Institutional variables significantly influenced how farmers adapted to climate change, and all of these issues might potentially be addressed by improving institutional service delivery. To improve farm-level adaptation, local authorities are recommended to investigate the institutional service provision system while also taking demographic and agroecological factors in to account.

Originality/value

This study compared farmers' perceptions with temperature and rainfall trend analysis, which has been rarely addressed by other studies. This study adopts an MVP model and indicated the adaptation strategies that complement/substitute strategies each other. Furthermore, this study discovered that the choice of adaptation options differed between poor and nonpoor households, which has been overlooked in previous climate change adaptation research.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 May 2024

Maryam Ijaz, Zaheer Ahmed and Nauman Khalid

This study aims to assess the information-seeking behaviors, attitudes and beliefs about pregnancy-related nutrition, food-related myths and taboos and supplementation among…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to assess the information-seeking behaviors, attitudes and beliefs about pregnancy-related nutrition, food-related myths and taboos and supplementation among pregnant women in different communities of Pakistan.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional quantitative survey method was used in this study, which included 150 pregnant women from various locations in Lahore and Faisalabad.

Findings

Most participants were between the ages of 25 and 29, having 14 years of education. Regardless of age or number of children, all selected women had the same dietary awareness. Regarding myths and taboos, highly significant values (p = 0.001) were found in various studied variables. No significant difference was observed in knowledge level between age and number of children. It was observed that food myths and taboos significantly (p = 0.001) impact pregnant women’s dietary choices.

Research limitations/implications

This survey experienced limited representativeness; many participants provided incomplete food and nutritional information. This research was conducted in two major districts of Pakistan, i.e. Lahore and Faisalabad; therefore, the results can be generalized for a population of pregnant women living in the northeastern region of Pakistan.

Practical implications

This study can provide helpful insight for health-care professionals to improve pregnant women’s nutritional status and knowledge.

Social implications

The outcomes of this study can help guide how pregnant women might be educated and have better nutritional awareness at domestic and professional levels.

Originality/value

In Pakistan, there is a lack of research on pregnant women’s nutritional knowledge, and this research can assist health-care professionals in providing diversified knowledge to promote maternal health.

Details

Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9342

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 October 2019

Nadeem Ahmad Khan, Saif Ullah Khan, Sirajuddin Ahmed, Izharul Haq Farooqi, Arshad Hussain, Sergij Vambol and Viola Vambol

The purpose of this paper is to cover some aspects about the disposal and regulatory standard around the world toward hospital effluent discharge, its managements and treatment…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to cover some aspects about the disposal and regulatory standard around the world toward hospital effluent discharge, its managements and treatment technologies that are adopted and best suitable nowadays.

Design/methodology/approach

Due to large and variety of antibiotics available in the market nowadays it is difficult to control its use, thereby risking the whole ecosystem and its components. The regulation pattern is variable depending upon the various factors in different countries. The permissible limit of these emerging pollutants found in sewage as compared to in hospital effluent streams having active pharmaceutical ingredients is very narrow and is a debatable issue.

Findings

The disparity in the available legislation for hospital waste management in different countries makes it difficult to compare pro’s and con’s of methods adopted. Strict laws need to be framed for hospital wastewater management and its treatment, as it contains harmful compounds in higher concentrations resulting in development of resistant genes. The guideline applicable nowadays makes it clear that, specific management guidelines with respect to HWW, but also indicate certain characteristics that can be represented to specify their nature and indicator.

Research limitations/implications

Determination of effluent characteristic for each specialized treatment need to be analyzed for meeting the framed regulatory standards. Up-gradation of existing treatment facilities, adopting new technologies and improving operation, maintained is a viable option. As there are no specific treatment schemes available hence combination and optimization of treatment methods may solve the problem to certain extent.

Practical implications

There is some flexibility also there so that law framework can be modified accordingly. For any health facilities direct discharges into natural water bodies it effluent need to follow national discharge standards. These are quite strict as compared to indirect standards and generally not meet by such facilities. This is quite logical because they are not being monitored or treated by municipal systems.

Social implications

The law indicates that hospital needed to collect and treat effluent according to the treatment standards. But on other hand the law was made making it consideration about the HWW collection in water bodies.

Originality/value

The best way of management as described, is to treat HWW onsite-dividing into primary, secondary and tertiary. The document also provides details about sludge disposal, possible reuse, including the application of new and innovative treatment technologies for HWW. It also provides guidance for minimum approach for HWW management because developing countries patients do not have proper sanitation facilities.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 September 2022

Daniel Belay

Social resources have gained considerable interest from scholars for their effect on youth's labor market outcomes. The available evidence indicates that social capital is a…

Abstract

Purpose

Social resources have gained considerable interest from scholars for their effect on youth's labor market outcomes. The available evidence indicates that social capital is a crucial factor in determining youth's labor force status. This paper examines the effect of social capital components on youth self-employment in Holeta town, Ethiopia.

Design/methodology/approach

Using youth survey data, principal component analysis (PCA) was conducted on social capital components datasets. This provided the construction of composite indicators for measuring social capital component, which are robust and exhibited construct validity. Following this, the effect of social capital component on youth self-employment was examined using Logit model.

Findings

The results show that institutional trust positively affects the likelihood of young people's decision to be self-employed.

Practical implications

The finding reveals a need to improve the transparency of the institutions' resource delivery, the competency of the institutions' workforce, communication, and information sharing of the institutions with the youth.

Originality/value

Looking at different social capital components simultaneously, the paper provides insight into the wide range of effects of social capital on youth self-employment.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 50 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 31 January 2023

Beshea Abdissa Chemeda, Feyera Senbeta Wakjira and Emiru Birhane

Background: A range of local social and environmental factors has an impact on farmers' views of climate change and choices on the use of coping mechanisms. This study examines…

Abstract

Background: A range of local social and environmental factors has an impact on farmers' views of climate change and choices on the use of coping mechanisms. This study examines the factors that are limiting farmers' perceptions of climate change and their coping mechanisms in Gimbi district, Western Ethiopia.

Methods: A household survey and focus group discussion were employed to collect relevant data. A total of 402 randomly selected households and six focus group discussions containing 72 participants were used to gather data. Binary logit models were used to analyze the collected data.

Results: Farmers noted that some of the signs of climate change included increasing temperature, erratic rainfall, late onset of rainfall, and early cessation of rainfall. We discovered that there are three distinct sets of climate adaption strategies used by farmers: crop management, soil and water conservation and intensive farm management. The primary determinants of farmers' perceptions of climate change and adaptation techniques were household head age, education, soil fertility, market access, and agricultural training. Age, education, and soil fertility level were the characteristics that significantly impacted farmers' perspectives and coping mechanisms among the primary drivers evaluated in the area. Use of agroforestry, shifting planting dates, and fertilizer application were all essential farming practices used as climate adaptation measures.

Conclusions: Both socioeconomic and environmental factors have found to affect farmers' perceptions of climate change in the area. The existing socioeconomic and environmental factors, in turn, affect their choice of strategies to adapt to climate change. When implementing climate change adaption strategies, it is critical to assess farmers' level of awareness of climate change and their coping strategies, as well as the factors limiting their ability to adapt to climate change.

Details

Emerald Open Research, vol. 1 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2631-3952

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 April 2020

Saheed Adewale Omoniyi, Adamu Musa Muhammad and Ruth Ayuba

Calyx of okra pods is usually cut off and discarded as a waste during processing, whereas the pulp and seeds are being used. This study aims to investigate the nutrient…

Abstract

Purpose

Calyx of okra pods is usually cut off and discarded as a waste during processing, whereas the pulp and seeds are being used. This study aims to investigate the nutrient composition and anti-nutritional properties of okra calyx flour.

Design/methodology/approach

Calyces from four varieties (Ex-kwadon, Solar, Chalawa and Syria) of okra pods were processed into flour. The proximate composition, mineral content, vitamin content and anti-nutritional composition of the flour samples were analysed by using standard methods.

Findings

There were significant differences in moisture content (p = 0.012), crude fat (p = 0.001), crude fibre (p = 0.002), carbohydrate (p = 0.002), sodium (p < 0.001), magnesium (p < 0.001), iron (p < 0.001), zinc (p = 0.006), vitamin A (p < 0.001) and vitamin C (p = 0.001) contents of okra calyx flour. The values of proximate composition ranged 8.1-8.9%, 8.4-9.0%, 14.3-15.3%, 1.4-2.1%, 16.9-18.2% and 47.1-49.4% for moisture content, ash, crude protein, crude fat, crude fibre and carbohydrate, respectively, whereas the values of mineral contents ranged 7.6-8.7 mg/100g, 35.7-41.2 mg/100g, 26.5-28.1 mg/100g, 93.2-95.8 mg/100g, 1.6-1.8 mg/100g and 5.2-5.7 mg/100g for sodium, magnesium, potassium, calcium, iron and zinc, respectively. The values of vitamin contents of okra calyx flour ranged 0.2-0.3 µg/100g, 7.1-8.9 mg/100g and 0.1-0.2 mg/100g for vitamin A, vitamin C and thiamine contents respectively. Also, there were significant differences in the values of phytate (p = 0.023), oxalate (p = 0.011) and saponin (p < 0.001) contents with the values of anti-nutritional properties ranging 1.3-1.5 mg/100g, 2.5-3.3 mg/100g, 7.4-9.7 mg/100g and 2.3-3.6 mg/100g for tannin, phytate, oxalate and saponin contents, respectively.

Research limitations/implications

There are scanty published works/information on proximate composition, mineral content, vitamin content and anti-nutritional composition of okra calyx flour.

Practical implications

The study showed that okra calyx flour could be useful in fortification/supplement of carbohydrate-based foods in food system.

Originality/value

Okra calyx flour comprises high crude fibre, crude protein, ash and vitamin C contents. Also, calcium is the major mineral content of okra calyx flour followed by magnesium and potassium. However, the tannin content reported higher in okra leaf flour, and okra flour is low in okra calyx flour.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 51 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

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