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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2017

Michelle Childs

The purpose of this study is to review and summarise the current body of literature on brand extension feedback effects and to identify which research issues are…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to review and summarise the current body of literature on brand extension feedback effects and to identify which research issues are inhibiting advancement in this stream of literature. Based on this analysis, suggestions for future research are provided.

Design/methodology/approach

In a systematic literature review, criteria were used to identify relevant journal publications that have specifically investigated brand extension feedback effects (n = 53). Research articles were subsequently evaluated for further analysis.

Findings

Several issues may inhibit advancement in the literature on brand extension feedback effects. These include issues related the conceptual, methodological and context of research, as well as related to the consumer, product, brand and marketing. Specific research questions are provided which address issues found in this literature stream.

Research limitations/implications

This paper aims to resolve issues in research on brand extension feedback effects to facilitate more rapid advancement in this stream of literature.

Originality/value

This research fills a need to summarise the current state of the literature and identifies research issues that need to be addressed in the future.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 26 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 4 June 2020

Jonas Lechermeier, Martin Fassnacht and Tillmann Wagner

While digital media changed the nature of communication in service contexts, often allowing customers to interact instantly with service providers, the implications and…

Abstract

Purpose

While digital media changed the nature of communication in service contexts, often allowing customers to interact instantly with service providers, the implications and opportunities for managing service employees are widely unknown. This is surprising, given that service employees are an important determinant of service firms’ success. This article examines the effects of real-time performance feedback on employees’ service performance and investigates both how and under what conditions timely feedback encourages employees’ engagement.

Design/methodology/approach

Two experiments test the conceptual model and the proposed hypotheses. A field experiment uses real customer feedback gathered after interaction with the app-chat of a large telecommunications provider. It tests the effect of feedback timing on service employees’ performance and also examines the effect of feedback timing on their engagement. A subsequent scenario-based experiment then investigates the influence of selected moderators on the feedback timing–engagement relationship.

Findings

This article finds that real-time feedback leads to greater service performance than subsequent feedback. Furthermore, real-time feedback positively affects service employee engagement through the perceived controllability of the feedback and the service situation. Finally, feedback valence, task goals, individuals’ need for closure (NCL), and gender interact with feedback timing to influence employee engagement.

Originality/value

This research investigates the potential of real-time performance feedback for service firms, combines and extends a variety of literature streams, and provides recommendations for the future management of service employees.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

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Article
Publication date: 26 July 2013

Mousumi Bose, Judith Anne Garretson Folse and Scot Burton

Managers are increasingly faced with situations that call for creative ways to engage consumers and employees. With online and offline options available for creative…

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1269

Abstract

Purpose

Managers are increasingly faced with situations that call for creative ways to engage consumers and employees. With online and offline options available for creative problem solving, consumers are constantly engaging with brands to provide different solutions to everyday problems. There are numerous contextual factors that influence creative output, external primes (distal vs proximal) being one of them. This research attempts to find the boundary conditions such as cognitive load, expectations of performance feedback and optimism that interact with environmental primes to influence quality and quantity of creativity. Doing so would help managers create conditions that can enhance creative output.

Design/methodology/approach

Three experiments were conducted; the first tests the interactive effect of primes and cognitive load, and the second involves the enhancing effect of expectation of performance feedback. Given that cognitive load depresses creativity and expectation of performance feedback enhances creativity, the third study finds whether optimism enhances the effects of distal primes under high cognitive load condition.

Findings

Study 1 demonstrates that the boundary factor of cognitive load moderates the relative difference between proximal and distal primes: cognitive load depresses the enhancing effects of distal primes. Study 2 demonstrates that expectation of performance feedback can enhance the effectiveness of distal primes to a greater extent than proximal primes. Study 3 suggests that highly optimistic individuals can overcome the depressing effects of cognitive load when exposed to distal primes and expectation of performance feedback.

Practical implications

The research demonstrates the environmental conditions that influence creative output in problem solving.

Originality/value

This research attempts to highlight the importance of contextual factors in influencing creativity. In the process, this research highlights the interactive forces that deter or enhance creativity so that managers can provide optimal conditions that enhance creative output for their employees and consumers.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 30 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Book part
Publication date: 17 January 2022

Elena Svetieva and Paulo N. Lopes

Purpose: The purpose of the present study is to review and specifically examine the untested but common recommendation that leaders should give more effective positive…

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of the present study is to review and specifically examine the untested but common recommendation that leaders should give more effective positive feedback that is specific and mindful of nonverbal delivery. Study Design/Methodology/Approach: We used a dyadic interaction study where designated “leaders” interact with a “subordinate” in an idea generation and evaluation task. Leaders (n = 90) first received brief training in delivering positive feedback, and their subsequent feedback behavior during the dyadic interaction was coded for frequency, specificity, and both verbal and nonverbal affective delivery. Key dependent variables were subordinate affective reactions, perceptions of the leader, and subsequent task motivation. Findings: Frequency of leader positive feedback had significant positive impact on subordinate perceptions of the leader, but no impact on subordinate positive affect or task motivation. Positive feedback specificity and affective delivery, however, had no impact on subordinate affect, perceptions of the leader, or task motivation. Training effects were also observed – leaders were able to increase the specificity of their feedback, but were not able to modulate their affective delivery. Originality/Value: The design of the study allowed us to identify the leader positive feedback behaviors that were trainable and had the most impact on subordinates in terms of positive affect, perceptions of the leader, and subsequent task effort. We discuss the implications of these effects for positive feedback theory and application and commonly assumed “best practices.”

Details

Emotions and Negativity
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-200-4

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Article
Publication date: 13 September 2019

Beichen Liang

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of self-efficacy, process feedback and task complexity on decisions by managers to continue or discontinue a new…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of self-efficacy, process feedback and task complexity on decisions by managers to continue or discontinue a new product after receiving negative performance feedback.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses a classroom experiment design and uses logistic regression and a chi-square test to analyze the data.

Findings

The findings of this paper show that self-efficacy, process feedback and task complexity have not only main effects but also interactive effects on managers’ go or no-go decisions; further, the main effects are mediated by interactions. The effect of self-efficacy is moderated by process feedback and task complexity. Process feedback and task complexity also have an interactive effect on decisions about new products by decision-makers.

Research limitations/implications

This paper extends the theory of escalation of commitment (EOC) by showing that self-efficacy, process feedback and task complexity can influence decision-makers’ go or no-go decisions after they have received negative performance feedback.

Practical implications

This paper provides useful guidelines for managers on how to reduce the likelihood of EOC.

Originality/value

The originality and value of this paper lie in its being the first to examine the effects of process feedback and task complexity on the EOC.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 34 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Book part
Publication date: 2 October 2003

David G Allen, Robert W Renn and Rodger W Griffeth

As more companies and employees become involved in telecommuting, researchers and managers will need to understand the effects of this relatively new working arrangement…

Abstract

As more companies and employees become involved in telecommuting, researchers and managers will need to understand the effects of this relatively new working arrangement on the work perceptions and behaviors of the individual telecommuter. The extant empirical literature provides mixed results and is limited by a lack of theory; consequently, neither researchers nor managers can rely on this literature for clear direction on how telecommuting will likely affect individual telecommuters. There is a critical need for theoretical frameworks to guide research on how telecommuting may affect the telecommuter’s job perceptions, working relations, and work outcomes. We present a multi-dimensional framework of telecommuting design, and focus on how telecommuting design may affect the telecommuter’s work environment and outcomes through its effects on the social system of the telecommuter, autonomy and self-management opportunities and requirements, and role boundaries, particularly in terms of the work and non-work interface. Our goal is to provide a framework to assist managers and researchers in systematically addressing questions of how to design telecommuting arrangements to maximize their potential benefits while minimizing their potential drawbacks.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-174-3

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Book part
Publication date: 23 July 2020

Shahriar M. Saadullah, Charles D. Bailey and Emad Awadallah

Purpose – Past literature suggests that the performance and turnover of the subordinate are affected by the support, abuse, and feedback provided by the supervisor. In…

Abstract

Purpose – Past literature suggests that the performance and turnover of the subordinate are affected by the support, abuse, and feedback provided by the supervisor. In this study, we posit that support, abuse, and feedback in an accounting firm, are in turn, affected by the supervisor's personality, as defined by the Big Five personality factors.

Methodology/approach – We conducted a web-based study with 115 accountants from a top 100 US accounting firm. The accountants completed questionnaires related to the personality of their supervisors along with questionnaires related to the support, abuse, and feedback they received from their supervisors. We analyzed the data using factor analysis and multiple regression.

Findings – We hypothesize that Openness and Agreeableness increase support; Neuroticism increases abuse, but less so if the supervisor is an Extravert; and Extraversion and Conscientiousness increase feedback. Among the hypothesized relationships, all are supported except the relationship between Openness and support. Additional findings are that Extraversion and Conscientiousness increase support; Agreeableness and Conscientiousness decrease abuse; and Agreeableness increases feedback.

Research implications – Our study contributes to the literature by demonstrating the relationship between the personality traits of supervisors and their behavior toward subordinates in an accounting setting. The results of our study can be used in identifying the supervisors who have the right personality for the position, which will likely improve the work environment and reduce turnover.

Details

Advances in Accounting Behavioral Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-402-1

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Article
Publication date: 26 July 2013

Abhishek Dwivedi and Bill Merrilees

Brand extension attitude is a key antecedent of consumers' reciprocal evaluations of parent brand equity. Traditionally, the link from brand extension attitude to change…

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2052

Abstract

Purpose

Brand extension attitude is a key antecedent of consumers' reciprocal evaluations of parent brand equity. Traditionally, the link from brand extension attitude to change in parent brand equity is modeled as a direct path, potentially obfuscating any underlying processes. The current research aims to propose that the impact of brand extension attitude on change in parent brand equity materializes via change in parent value equity perceptions of a parent brand.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual model is developed, positioning change in parent value equity as a mediator of the effect of brand extension attitude. The model is estimated on a sample of 888 Australian consumers using a cross‐sectional self‐administered survey. Drawing upon actual industry dynamics, a hypothetical scenario of Australian supermarkets extending into the banking sector is used as stimulus.

Findings

The research model demonstrates acceptable fit to data, confirming most hypotheses. Change in parent value equity mediates the effect of brand extension attitude on change in parent brand equity. Rival model comparisons, however, reveal that a partial mediation scenario better represents feedback effects. The research model is suitably modified to include an additional path.

Practical implications

The current study broadens the scope of brand extension feedback effects from parent brand equity to additionally include parent value equity. Practitioners can now envision brand extensions as simultaneously impacting multiple facets of a parent brand, not previously considered.

Originality/value

The current research explicates an underlying process of how consumers' extension‐derived attitudes are converted into revised parent brand equity evaluations. Such an insight is novel in the literature.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 30 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 31 May 2011

Rana Sobh and Brett A.S. Martin

Marketers spend considerable resources to motivate people to consume their products and services as a means of goal attainment. Why people change their consumption…

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6052

Abstract

Purpose

Marketers spend considerable resources to motivate people to consume their products and services as a means of goal attainment. Why people change their consumption behaviour is based largely on these goals; many products and services are used by consumers in an effort to attain hoped‐for selves and/or to avoid feared selves. Despite the importance for marketers in understanding how current performance influences a consumer's future efforts, this topic has received little attention in marketing research. The aim of this paper is to fill some of the gaps.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides a theoretical framework and uses two studies to test this. Study 1, of 203 women, aged 27‐65, examines the predictions in the context of women and visible signs of skin aging. Feedback information is measured and approach and avoidance regulatory systems are manipulated by priming hoped‐for and feared possible selves. Study 2, of 281 undergraduate men and women, replicates the findings of Study 1 with manipulated feedback, using a different context (gym training) and a sample of both male and females.

Findings

The research shows that when consumers pursue a hoped‐for self, it is expectations of success that most strongly drive their motivation. It also shows why doing badly when trying to avoid a feared self is more motivating than doing well.

Practical implications

The findings have important implications as they reveal how managers can motivate customers to keep using a product or service.

Originality/value

The paper makes several contributions to the consumer goal research literature since little is known about how positive (hoped‐for selves) and negative (feared selves) reference points in self‐regulation differentially influence consumer goal‐directed behaviour.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 45 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 18 April 2017

Shinyoung Kim, Sunmee Choi and Rohit Verma

In services, customers’ successful performance of expected roles is critical to ensuring successful service outcomes. To help customers perform their roles better, service…

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1498

Abstract

Purpose

In services, customers’ successful performance of expected roles is critical to ensuring successful service outcomes. To help customers perform their roles better, service providers offer them feedback on their performance. To improve the design of customer feedback that contains both positive and negative messages, the purpose of this paper is to examine the order and the repetition effect of feedback message types on customer feedback satisfaction, motivation, and compliance intention, focusing on the moderating effect of customer involvement level. This paper also examines whether feedback satisfaction and motivation mediate the moderation effect of the order or repetition of feedback message type and customer involvement level on compliance intention.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employs two between-subject quasi-experimental designs: 2 (feedback message order: positive message first vs negative message first) × 2 (involvement level: high vs low) and a 2 (repeated feedback type: positive vs negative) × 2 (involvement level: high vs low). Data collection occurred through an online survey using eight health checkup scenarios. Hypotheses were tested by using MANOVA and PROCESS.

Findings

The customer involvement level moderated the effect of the presentation order of feedback message type on customer responses. With highly involved customers, offering positive feedback initially produced responses that were more favorable. With customers with low involvement, the order did not matter. The effects of feedback satisfaction and motivation as mediators in the effect of order on compliance intention were significant only with highly involved customers. The mediation effect of motivation was much stronger than that of feedback satisfaction. The repetition of a particular feedback type took effect only with customers with low-involvement level. Compared to the no-repetition condition (positive-negative), when positive feedback was repeated (positive-negative-positive), motivation increased. Compared to the no-repetition condition (negative-positive), when negative feedback was repeated (negative-positive-negative), feedback satisfaction and compliance intention decreased. In terms of mediating effect, only feedback satisfaction was a meaningful mediator and only when negative feedback was repeated to low-involvement customers.

Originality/value

This study contributes to research by extending feedback studies in services to include a consideration of the order and repetition of feedback message types as design variables; it contributes practically by suggesting how to design feedback for better customer responses such as feedback satisfaction, motivation, and compliance intention.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

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