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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Jui‐Chen Chen and Colin Silverthorne

This study aims to test the Hersey and Blanchard Situation Leadership Theory (SLT) of leadership effectiveness and the impact of the degree of match between leadership style and…

42038

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to test the Hersey and Blanchard Situation Leadership Theory (SLT) of leadership effectiveness and the impact of the degree of match between leadership style and employee readiness level on a variety of measures of leadership outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

The measures used were employee job satisfaction, job performance, job stress, and turnover intention. SLT argues that an effective leader adopts a leadership style according to the ability and willingness of subordinates for a given task.

Findings

The results did not support SLT predictions that an appropriate match between leadership style and subordinate readiness results in higher levels of subordinate job satisfaction and performance and lower levels of job stress and intention to leave. However, the results did partially support SLT in that, the higher the leader's leadership score, the more effective is the leader's influence. However, the leadership score did not predict job performance. There was a positive correlation between ability and willingness, employee job satisfaction, and job performance. Employee willingness positively correlated with job satisfaction and job performance and was negatively correlated with turnover intention.

Research limitations/implications

The findings from this study apply to the Taiwan culture and may or may not apply to other “Chinese” and non‐Chinese cultures.

Practical implications

The use of the SLT in Taiwan is very widespread, so this study provides empirical evidence of its value when used in Taiwan as a tool to develop and use effective and appropriate leadership abilities.

Originality/value

Few studies have attempted to explore the value of SLT in general and in non‐Western cultures in particular. This study expands our knowledge of leadership issues to an Eastern culture and explores the theory's effectiveness related to several organizational factors.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1986

Rabindra N. Kanungo

Increasing productivity is the major goal of every successful organisation, be it private or public, service or manufacturing. In order to achieve this goal, the organisation has…

Abstract

Increasing productivity is the major goal of every successful organisation, be it private or public, service or manufacturing. In order to achieve this goal, the organisation has to depend to a large extent on both covert and overt behaviours of its members. The covert behaviours of organisational members refer to such psychological phenomena as job satisfaction, involvement and other related attitudes and beliefs. The overt behaviours, on the other hand, refer to directly observable behaviours such as absenteeism, tardiness, and other forms of on‐the‐job behaviour. It is the task of organisational psychologists to identify these behaviours and establish specific causal relationships between these behaviours and productivity.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 7 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2006

Jui‐Chen Chen, Colin Silverthorne and Jung‐Yao Hung

To further understand the impact of organizational communication and commitment on job stress and performance. Over the past 20 years, the constructs of organizational commitment…

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Abstract

Purpose

To further understand the impact of organizational communication and commitment on job stress and performance. Over the past 20 years, the constructs of organizational commitment and communication have been studied extensively but little attention has been paid to the relationship between them and other organizational variables such as job performance and stress. Also, differences between employees either in managerial or full time accounting positions and between respondents from the USA and Taiwan were evaluated.

Design/methodology/approach

Differences and relationships were assessed using standardized and valid instruments measuring four organizational variables in Taiwan and the USA.

Findings

No country level difference in stress and communication levels were found but organizational commitment and performance levels were higher in the USA. At the same time, higher levels of organizational communication led to higher levels of organizational commitment and job performance in both countries. Rather surprisingly, stress levels were not found to be related to either organizational communication or job performance. Further, the only measure that indicated a difference between those in managerial and full time accounting positions was work performance which was higher for those doing full time accounting.

Practical implications

The results are discussed in terms of their importance and implications for organizations, particularly those utilizing employees with professional training and operating in different cultures. The finding that stress levels were not reduced by increased organizational communication and had little impact on job performance suggests that in the accounting field stress may play a different role than it does in other professions.

Originality/value

Furthers our understanding on the impact of organizational communication and commitment on job stress and performance.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1997

Magid Igbaria and Conrad Shayo

United States government statistics have shown that although women and minorities have made impressive gains in employment during 1980s, they continue to be underrepresented in…

Abstract

United States government statistics have shown that although women and minorities have made impressive gains in employment during 1980s, they continue to be underrepresented in positions of power and responsibility, especially at the senior management and executive positions. This trend has also been observed in the Information Systems (IS) field (Wilson, 1990). It has been reported that women and blacks encounter a glass ceiling that prevents them from reaching the top levels of IS positions (Johnson, 1990; Morrison and Glinow, 1990). A number of potential causes of this glass ceiling effect have been suggested:

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 16 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

Article
Publication date: 24 August 2023

Felipe Muñoz Medina, Sergio Andrés López Bohle, Jeske Van Beurden, Maria José Chambel and Sebastian M. Ugarte

Although research on job insecurity (JI) and its relationship with employee performance has increased in recent years, results are mixed and inconclusive. The objectives of this…

Abstract

Purpose

Although research on job insecurity (JI) and its relationship with employee performance has increased in recent years, results are mixed and inconclusive. The objectives of this paper are to explore 1) the conceptualizations of JI, 2) the relationship between JI and different performance dimensions, 3) the theoretical perspectives used to explain the JI–performance relationship and 4) the mechanisms and contextual boundaries that affect the JI–performance relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Following the PRISMA guidelines, the authors systematically searched for peer-reviewed empirical studies published before July 2021 in Web of Science and Scopus. The authors analyzed 81 empirical studies published on the conceptualization of job insecurity, its relationship with employee performance, and what mechanisms and contingency factors are studied. The authors used thematic analysis to analyze the articles.

Findings

Results of this review show that the quantitative cognitive dimension is dominant in extant JI literature. Furthermore, in-role performance and OCB were most often investigated in relation to the four dimensions of job insecurity, drawing from a range of theoretical perspectives to explain this relationship. Moreover, a variety of mechanisms and contextual factors on individual, individual work-related, individual-level attitudes and job-level characteristics have found to play a role in this relationship.

Research limitations/implications

This study has a number of limitations. The first pertains to the exclusion of articles in languages other than English and non-peer reviewed papers. It is possible that the search strategy used may not have identified other studies that may have met the established criteria in order to be included in our research. However, this method was chosen to guarantee the quality of the included articles in this study and in line with previous meta-analyses and literature reviews (De Witte et al., 2016; Sverke et al., 2019). Second, one selection criteria focused on how performance was assessed in the studies incorporated in this literature review. The authors excluded studies that addressed performance from the perspective of the organization (i.e. studies that measured performance at the organizational level). The authors herewith might have excluded studies that focused on one or multiple job insecurity constructs, but the authors herewith included studies that were comparable in terms of performance indicator outcomes. Future studies could expand the search by investigating, as a next step, the impact on organizational performance. Finally, since the focus of this literature review was on the relationship between job insecurity and performance indicators, including the mechanisms and boundary conditions that affect this relationship, the authors did not include focus on how job insecurity can be influenced (Shoss, 2017), and herewith lack information on the predictors side of job insecurity. However, by narrowing the authors focus to mediators and moderators, the authors were able to come up with an extensive list of factors that impact the job insecurity–performance relationship and herewith provide fruitful areas for future research. Future studies could expand these findings by providing an overview of predictors of different job insecurity constructs, to see whether there are potential different predictors of job insecurity conceptualizations (Jiang and Lavaysse, 2018).

Practical implications

The study review contributes to the systematization of the current empirical evidence on this area of research. This is especially important and enables room to take an additional step toward understanding the consequences of job insecurity on performance. Specifically, it is important for organizations and policymakers to be aware of the different conceptualizations of job insecurity that exist and how they impact employee performance. In addition, an overview of potential mechanisms and boundary conditions that affect this relationship provides insights as to how organizations can intervene to affect reactions to job insecurity.

Social implications

The study findings are relevant and may be of interest to decision makers in organizations and national authorities that must have information on quality concerning the effects of job insecurity on performance.

Originality/value

Based on these findings the authors show the impact of the different conceptualizations of job insecurity and how they affect job performance. In addition, the authors provide recommendations for future studies how to better handle the integration of different conceptualizations and measures of job insecurity and its different approaches.

Details

Career Development International, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 31 August 2023

Lilian M. de Menezes and Ana B. Escrig-Tena

This paper aims to improve our understanding of performance measurement systems in the health and care sector, by focussing on employee reactions to core performance measurement…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to improve our understanding of performance measurement systems in the health and care sector, by focussing on employee reactions to core performance measurement practices. Targets and monitoring are hypothesised to be associated with employee perceptions of job control, supportive management and job demands, which in turn, are expected to be linked to employee-wellbeing and organisational commitment.

Design/methodology/approach

Matched employee workplace data are extracted from a nationally representative and publicly available survey. Structural equation models are estimated.

Findings

Performance measurement systems are neither perceived as resources nor additional demands. Setting many targets and a focus on productivity can lead to negative employee outcomes, since these positively correlate with perceptions of job demands, which negatively correlate with employee wellbeing. However, monitoring financial performance and monitoring employee performance may be helpful to managers, as these are positively associated with employee perceptions of job control and supportive management, which positively correlate with job satisfaction and organisational commitment and, negatively, with anxiety. Overall, common criticisms of performance measurement systems in healthcare are questioned.

Originality/value

Given the lack of consensus on how performance measurement systems can influence employee experiences and outcomes, this study combines theories that argue for performance measurement systems in managing operations with models developed by psychologists to describe how perceptions of the work conditions can affect employee attitude and wellbeing. A conceptual model is therefore developed and tested, and potential direct and indirect effects of performance measurement systems in the health sector are inferred.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 43 no. 13
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 28 June 2023

Indrayani Indrayani, Nurhatisyah Nurhatisyah, Damsar Damsar and Chablullah Wibisono

This study aims to test and analyze the effect of continuous commitment, task complexity, competence and personal value on employee performance millennial intervening job

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to test and analyze the effect of continuous commitment, task complexity, competence and personal value on employee performance millennial intervening job satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

This research method is quantitative with a sequential explanatory design, then data collection through a questionnaire, with a sample of 205 respondents—data analysis using Structural Equation Model (SEM) with the software Linear Structural Relationship (LISREL).

Findings

The results of research on the performance of millennial employees with intervening work satisfaction showed that continuous commitment (2.49), task complexity (2.74) and professional competence (2.0) had a significant effect. This means that the performance of millennial employees will increase if they get job satisfaction. With satisfaction, the commitment and competence of millennial employees are high. While the research results for the performance of millennial employees have a direct influence, only professional competence (2.27) and task complexity (4.06) are significant. This means that as high as professional competence is characterized by intellectual, emotional mood and attitude, owned by millennial employees, the resulting performance is increased even with complex tasks.

Research limitations/implications

The findings of this study have significance for enhancing organizational performance so that businesses can maximize the performance of millennial employees by paying attention to job satisfaction, professional competence and personal values.

Originality/value

This research's contribution to millennial workers is to help them improve and develop their performance, allowing them to compete more effectively. The findings of this study have significance for enhancing organizational performance so that businesses can maximize the performance of millennial employees by paying attention to job satisfaction, professional competence and personal values.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 17 March 2010

Christopher C. Rosen, Chu-Hsiang Chang, Emilija Djurdjevic and Erin Eatough

This chapter provides an updated review of research examining the relationship between occupational stressors and job performance. We begin by presenting an eight-category…

Abstract

This chapter provides an updated review of research examining the relationship between occupational stressors and job performance. We begin by presenting an eight-category taxonomy of workplace stressors and we then review theories that explain the relationships between workplace stressors and job performance. The subsequent literature review is divided into two sections. In the first section, we present a summary of Jex's (1998) review of research on the job stress–job performance relationship. In the second section, we provide an updated review of the literature, which includes studies that have been published since 1998. In this review, we evaluate how well the contemporary research has dealt with weaknesses and limitations previously identified in the literature, we identify and evaluate current trends, and we offer recommendations and directions for future research.

Details

New Developments in Theoretical and Conceptual Approaches to Job Stress
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-713-4

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2023

Dongqing Yu and Junjun Chen

The current study investigated the impact of organisational trust on emotional well-being and performance of middle leaders during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic.

Abstract

Purpose

The current study investigated the impact of organisational trust on emotional well-being and performance of middle leaders during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic.

Design/methodology/approach

A convenience sample of 265 middle leaders in kindergartens in China responded involving trust in schools (e.g. trust in principal and trust in colleagues), emotional well-being and job performance. Both confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modelling (SEM) were used in the investigation.

Findings

Three hypotheses on the relationships between the three constructs were verified. Trust in schools significantly influenced emotional well-being and job performance of middle leaders which correlated with each other. The interactive effects of trust in principal and trust in colleagues were discussed for improving the well-being and job performance of middle leaders. Relationships between the two kinds of trust and pride were also identified in the research.

Research limitations/implications

Further studies may put efforts towards improving these three outcomes synchronously.

Practical implications

Based on the evidence of the current study, future research may focus on how middle leaders act as a bridging role between different stakeholders such as principal and teachers, principal and parents, teachers and children, meanwhile how to boost the leaders' own well-being and performance in the early childhood education (ECE).

Originality/value

This study established the empirical linkages between school trusts, emotional well-being and job performance.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 2 October 2003

Walter C Borman, Jerry W Hedge, Kerri L Ferstl, Jennifer D Kaufman, William L Farmer and Ronald M Bearden

This chapter provides a contemporary view of state-of-the science research and thinking done in the areas of selection and classification. It takes as a starting point the…

Abstract

This chapter provides a contemporary view of state-of-the science research and thinking done in the areas of selection and classification. It takes as a starting point the observation that the world of work is undergoing important changes that are likely to result in different occupational and organizational structures. In this context, we review recent research on criteria, especially models of job performance, followed by sections on predictors, including ability, personality, vocational interests, biodata, and situational judgment tests. The paper also discusses person-organization fit models, as alternatives or complements to the traditional person-job fit paradigm.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-174-3

1 – 10 of over 109000