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Book part

Prisca Brosi and Marvin Schuth

Purpose – We aim to elucidate the influence of leaders' emotion expressions on the social distance between leaders and followers in face-to-face and digital communication.…

Abstract

Purpose – We aim to elucidate the influence of leaders' emotion expressions on the social distance between leaders and followers in face-to-face and digital communication.

Design/methodology/approach – Literature review

Findings – Following functional theories on emotions, leaders' expressions of socially engaging emotions (e.g., guilt, happiness, gratitude, and compassion) lower social distance. Leaders' expressions of socially disengaging emotions (e.g., anger, contempt, disgust, and pride) increase social distance. In digital communication, we propose that the effect of socially engaging and disengaging emotions depends on the social presence that is provided by the different digital communication media.

Practical implication – Based on our theoretical model, we derive implications for (1) leaders' use of face-to-face communication, (2) the importance of digital communication with high social presence, (3) leaders' use of digital communication as a tool for emotion regulation, and (4) coping strategies when communicating via digital means with low social presence.

Details

Emotions and Service in the Digital Age
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-260-2

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Book part

Charmine E.J. Härtel, Neal M. Ashkanasy and Wilfred J. Zerbe

In this overview, the editors trace the history of 10 books they have helmed in what has become the legacy of the Emonet conferences. From the seeds planted in 1998 by a…

Abstract

In this overview, the editors trace the history of 10 books they have helmed in what has become the legacy of the Emonet conferences. From the seeds planted in 1998 by a small group of international scholars assembled together at the first Emonet conference, the shift of the study of emotions in organizational studies from the almost “undiscussable” to mainstream scholarship is traced. Following this historical analysis, the story of “What have we learned? Ten years on,” the latest volume in the Emonet book series, is given. In a brief summary of each chapter in the current edition, the editors draw attention to eight topic areas to showcase the remarkable and broad-ranging advances in the field of organization studies that have been enabled by attention to the role of emotions in theory and practice in 10 years since the first publication in the book series. From advances in our knowledge and understanding of work, workers and consumers, to team behavior, leader-member exchange, and In Extremis work contexts, and methodological contributions in the assessment of noncognitive traits through to advances in knowledge of positive work environments, the reader is left in no doubt that organizational scholarship and practice has been deeply enriched through bringing emotions center stage.

Details

What Have We Learned? Ten Years On
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-208-1

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Article

Charlotte Huard, Andrée-Ann Deschênes and Charles-Antoine Rioux

The main purpose of this research is to establish the relationships between emotional self-efficacy and workplace psychological health for emergency dispatchers.

Abstract

Purpose

The main purpose of this research is to establish the relationships between emotional self-efficacy and workplace psychological health for emergency dispatchers.

Design/methodology/approach

A correlational design was used to validate results of the study. Between December 2018 and February 2019, a secure online questionnaire was sent to dispatchers through four emergency call centers. Participation was voluntary. A total of 257 emergency dispatchers participated in this study. Gilbert et al.’s (2011) scale of workplace psychological health and Deschênes et al.’s (2019) scale of emotional self-efficacy were used. Multiple linear regression and Pearson's correlation tests were run using the SPSS 25 program in order to establish relationships between the two variables.

Findings

A total of three emotional competencies positively affect workplace psychological well-being (PWB), i.e. self-efficacy beliefs on managing one's own emotions, on managing other people' emotions and on using one's own emotions. As regards to psychological distress (PD), it is negatively correlated to self-efficacy beliefs on managing and using one's own emotions.

Research limitations/implications

One of the study's theoretical contributions is to broaden the scientific knowledge of emergency service dispatching, in addition to opening up a new field of study in workplace people management.

Practical implications

These scientific findings therefore show the importance of emotional self-efficacy in the workplace. The manager or the dispatch leader should focus on developing the following three emotional skills: self-efficacy in managing emotions, managing the emotions felt by others and using emotions. Training allowing the development of these emotional skills should be considered and would be beneficial for emergency dispatchers to maximize their well-being at work.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, no other study has focused on emergency dispatchers and included the emotional self-efficacy and workplace mental health variables.

Details

International Journal of Emergency Services, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2047-0894

Keywords

Content available
Article

Terje Slåtten, Gudbrand Lien, Solveig Beyza Narli Evenstad and Terje Onshus

The overall aim of this study is to explore factors associated with academic performance among university students. Specifically, it explores whether a supportive study…

Abstract

Purpose

The overall aim of this study is to explore factors associated with academic performance among university students. Specifically, it explores whether a supportive study climate is directly related to academic performance and whether students’ psychological capital (PsyCap), positive emotions and study engagement play a role in the relationship between supportive study climate and academic performance.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 588 bachelor students from a range of academic programs participated in a survey. The partial least squares (PLS)-based structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to test the conceptual models and the hypothesized relationships, using the software SmartPLS.

Findings

No support was found for a direct relationship between supportive study climate and academic performance. However, the results show that PsyCap, positive emotions and study engagement have a mediating role between supportive study climate and academic performance. In addition, the findings reveal a multifaceted pattern among PsyCap, positive emotions and study engagement that promotes academic performance.

Originality/value

This is the first study that simultaneously explores the role of PsyCap, emotions and study engagement between supportive study climate and academic performance among university students. Consequently, it broadens and deepens previous research and offers both theoretical and practical implications.

Details

International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-669X

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Article

Tahereh Heydarnejad, Azar Hosseini Fatemi and Behzad Ghonsooly

For this purpose, Teacher Self-Regulation Scale (TSRS), Emotions Questionnaire for Teachers (EQT) and Grasha's Teaching Style Inventory (TSI) were employed to gauge the…

Abstract

Purpose

For this purpose, Teacher Self-Regulation Scale (TSRS), Emotions Questionnaire for Teachers (EQT) and Grasha's Teaching Style Inventory (TSI) were employed to gauge the influences of teacher self-regulation on university teachers' emotions and preferred teaching style. The participants of this study were 320 university teachers, majored in different branches of English (English Literature, English Teaching, English Translation), teaching in different universities of Iran. To shed light on the causal associations, a path analysis was run using LISREL 8.80.

Design/methodology/approach

Following the pivotal role of effective teaching on educational well-being, the present study delve into three significant teacher-related variables i.e. teacher self-regulation, emotions and teaching style. For this purpose, TSRS, EQT, and Grasha's TSI were employed to gauge the influences of teacher self-regulation on university teachers' emotions and preferred teaching style. The participants of this study were 320 university teachers, majored in different branches of English (English Literature, English Teaching, English Translation), teaching in different universities of Iran. To shed light on the causal associations, a path analysis was run using LISREL 8.80.

Findings

Based on the findings, teacher self-regulation predicts pleasant emotions positively; whereas, it predicts unpleasant emotions in a negative direction. The results also demonstrate that teacher self-regulation positively and significantly predicts student-centred styles (Facilitator and Delegator), and the reverse is true for teacher-centred styles (Formal Authority, Personal Model, and Expert).

Research limitations/implications

Future studies may advance the possible relationships among the subscales of teacher self-regulation, teacher emotion and teaching style. Also, further investigations are suggested to target the teacher self-regulation, teacher emotion and teaching style in enhancing language learners' achievement.

Practical implications

In effect, the findings of the current study contribute to the fields of teacher psychology and teacher education. The implications of this study may open another perspective into university teachers’ psychological well-being and professional development.

Social implications

The implications of this study may redound to the advantage of policy makers, curriculum designers, teacher educators, as well as university teachers.

Originality/value

The implications of this study may redound to the advantage of policy-makers, curriculum designers, teacher educators and university teachers.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

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Article

Shehla Malik

This study aims to assess the role of various emotional intelligence dimensions in stimulating two types of employee knowledge sharing behaviour – tacit knowledge sharing…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to assess the role of various emotional intelligence dimensions in stimulating two types of employee knowledge sharing behaviour – tacit knowledge sharing behaviour and explicit knowledge sharing behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

The causal relationships among the constructs were tested by applying quantitative research methods. A questionnaire-based survey was used to draw a sample from 10 information technology (IT) organizations in India. A data set of 308 usable questionnaires was analysed using structural equation modeling technique to test the hypothesized relationships among various constructs.

Findings

This study found that all four dimensions of emotional intelligence, namely, self-emotional appraisal, others’ emotional appraisal, use of emotion and regulation of emotion have a positive effect on tacit knowledge sharing behaviour of employees. In addition, explicit knowledge sharing behaviour was also positively influenced by others’ emotional appraisal and use of emotion. However, no significant effect was made by self-emotional appraisal and regulation of emotion on explicit knowledge sharing behaviour of employees.

Originality/value

Little is empirically known about the link between emotional intelligence constructs and knowledge sharing behaviours. This study brings new insights by assessing the role of different emotional intelligence dimensions on two different types of knowledge sharing behaviour. An interesting finding advances the understanding of knowledge sharing behaviours by indicating a greater variance in tacit knowledge sharing behaviour (caused by emotional constructs) as compared to explicit knowledge sharing behaviour.

Details

Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9342

Keywords

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Article

Birgit Leisen Pollack

The purpose of this study is to provide insights into mechanism by which environmentally friendly initiatives positively affect a service firm's revenue stream. First, it…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to provide insights into mechanism by which environmentally friendly initiatives positively affect a service firm's revenue stream. First, it explores attributes consumers associate with green services. Second, it affirms the mediating role of warm emotions in connecting green services to satisfaction and customer loyalty. Third, it investigates a set of amplifiers of warm emotions. These are the green tendencies of the consumer and perceived motives for adopting environmentally friendly practices.

Design/methodology/approach

This research involved two studies. A critical incident study was used to tap into the consumer's perspective on green services. A total of 262 attributes of green services were categorized into overarching themes. A quantitative study addressed the mediating relationships and amplifiers of warm emotions. Pooled across three services, a total of 846 observations were analyzed.

Findings

The findings reveal that a consumer views a service as environmentally friendly if it exhibits green attributes in either the core service, service delivery process, service environment or peripheral service activities. The results of Study II affirm that warm emotions mediate the relationship between perceptions of the environmental friendliness of a service and customer satisfaction as well as customer loyalty. The study findings suggest that positive emotions are further strengthened by the level of greenness of the consumer and by a firm's money saving motives as well as environmental preservation motives the consumer attributes to the adoption of green practices.

Originality/value

This study advances the authors' understanding of what attributes consumers associate with service greenness. This research expands on the service greenness and positive emotions connection by including an initial set of amplifiers of positive emotions to include the greenness of the consumer and motives for adopting green practices.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

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Article

Il-Kyoung Kwon and Sang-Yong Lee

The focus in ICT development has shifted from performance to maximization of tangibility. In particular, the interests in emotion-based services increase and more…

Abstract

Purpose

The focus in ICT development has shifted from performance to maximization of tangibility. In particular, the interests in emotion-based services increase and more attention is paid to improving the quality of service and maximizing tangibility. Hence, it is necessary to model human emotions and utilize inferred emotions for services in order to enhance the quality of emotion-based personalized services. To this end, this study aims to model personalized emotional space by means of V-A emotion model and to suggest a fuzzy-based emotion inference method.

Design/methodology/approach

This study takes advantage of V-A emotion model, AHP and fuzzy integral technique to implement an emotion inference based on the quantitative evaluation and systematic expression of human emotions. By means of AHP, the personalized V-A emotion model was established. Fuzzy measure and Choquet integral methods were applied for emotion inference based on the inputs of valence and arousal (V-A) values, with the results evaluated in an experiment.

Findings

Thayer's emotion model structures 12 human emotions in reference to V-A values. This structure, however, may differ depending on individuals, and thus a method to measure and express it appropriately is necessary. This study evaluates the relative weight of 12 emotions based on AHP and regularizes them to compose the personalized V-A emotional space by drafting the V-A model. In addition, fuzzy integral-based emotion inference has been tested in reference to the V-A values on the established V-A emotion space.

Originality/value

Fuzzy integral-based emotion inference has been tested in reference to the V-A values on the established personalized emotion space.

Details

Journal of Systems and Information Technology, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1328-7265

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Article

Suzanne Hazelton

Highlights the power of positive emotions in helping to build individual and organizational success.

Abstract

Purpose

Highlights the power of positive emotions in helping to build individual and organizational success.

Design/methodology/approach

Explores the meaning of positive emotions, how they can be promoted at individual and organizational level and the benefits they can bring to the individual and organization.

Findings

Advances the view that positive emotions can benefit physical health, mental well-being and the ability to flourish, creativity, resilience, the mood of others, positive memories and relationships.

Practical implications

Argues that the positive emotions of the workforce can improve the organizational culture and improve organizational performance.

Social implications

Demonstrates that around three positive emotions are needed to balance out each negative emotion and shows that positive emotions can be stimulated through having new experiences and through acts of kindness and gratitude.

Originality/value

Extends psychological thinking on positive emotions to the workforce and workplace.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

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Article

Alan R. Peslak

To explore the relationships between emotions and overall team processes and task performance.

Abstract

Purpose

To explore the relationships between emotions and overall team processes and task performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The work begins with a literature review of the major studies performed on emotions and their affects on teams. This study then specifically surveys a group of information technology student teams at various stages of a term‐long project to determine their level of feelings in 15 separate emotions at each stage. Also measured are effects of emotions on attitudes towards team processes. Regression analysis was used to measure the significance of several hypotheses.

Findings

Overall findings specifically measured the five hypotheses. It was found that team emotions at the start of the project are more positive than negative. Negative emotions grow more than positive over the life of the project. Emotions show increased intensity over the life of the project. Initial emotions did not significantly affect overall team processes. Final emotions somewhat affected overall team processes.

Research limitations/applications

The small sample size does limit generalizations but the work can serve as a framework for more extensive and industry situated studies.

Practical implications

The work suggests issues related to the impact and evolution of emotions on team projects. Practitioners can begin to focus on efforts that can improve emotions and potentially overall team success.

Originality/value

There is little work done on the evolution of emotions and their effects on team processes. The paper begins the dialogue on an important aspect of team dynamics.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 11 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

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