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Article
Publication date: 4 August 2021

Oscar Noel Ocho, Erica Wheeler, Janet Rigby and Gail Tomblin Murphy

Nurses are a significant part of the professional workforce, but leaders may be promoted without the requisite competencies. This study aims to explore the perspectives of nurse…

Abstract

Purpose

Nurses are a significant part of the professional workforce, but leaders may be promoted without the requisite competencies. This study aims to explore the perspectives of nurse managers about the core competencies necessary for promotion as leaders in health.

Design/methodology/approach

This was a mixed-methods study that targeted nurses (N = 126) who were promoted in four Caribbean countries over the past five years. A 30-item questionnaire was used for quantitative data collection and analyzed using SPSS version 25. Interviews yielded the qualitative data, which were analyzed using open coding and thematic analysis. Ethical approvals were received from ethics committees at the university and country level.

Findings

Most participants were female (n = 112), had 15 or more years’ experience (n = 71) and an associate degree/diploma in nursing (n = 62). Leadership was the most important competency required of nurse leaders in spite of their position within the organization, followed by team building and motivation. Challenges to the transitioning into leadership positions included the prevailing culture and a lack of a systematic approach to building capacity in leadership. There was also between-group statistical significance, as determined by one-way ANOVA for delegation, motivation and leadership as core competencies based on occupations roles.

Research limitations/implications

Notwithstanding the importance of the findings from this research, there were some limitations. While the researchers considered implementing this study in eight Caribbean countries, approvals were received for only four countries. This will affect the ability to generalize the findings to the wider Caribbean countries. One of the strengths of this research was the use of mixed methods for data collection. However, the qualitative component of the findings may be limited by the number of focus groups conducted, notwithstanding the richness of the data collected.

Practical implications

The findings can be used as a framework from which the health system in developing countries can begin to examine practical solutions to developing 21st century leadership competencies in nursing. While there may be remanence of the colonial past in the way systems function, the complexity of health systems requires leadership that is rooted in competence that is multidimensional.

Originality/value

This paper provides an important contribution to the literature on leadership and competencies from the perspective of low- to middle-income resource settings. The qualitative component of the research added richness to the nuances and understanding of the phenomenon of competencies for nurse leaders.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1980

Erica Wheeler and M. Phil

‘Nutrition in education’ rather than ‘Nutrition education’: is there a difference? Last September a small meeting was organised by UNESCO to discuss the topic of Nutrition in

Abstract

‘Nutrition in education’ rather than ‘Nutrition education’: is there a difference? Last September a small meeting was organised by UNESCO to discuss the topic of Nutrition in educational policy and planning, and it became clear from the outset that what participants were concerned about was not so much ‘What are children taught about nutrition?’ but ‘How do ideas about nutrition enter into the planning of education services?’ Although the discussions and papers related mostly to the Third World, some of the conclusions would apply elsewhere as well.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 80 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1983

Eleanor Carlson, Michael Kipps and James Thomson

Any discussion of minority ethnic group food habits would be incomplete without including the Chinese who have a food culture very different from the indigenous culture; a food…

Abstract

Any discussion of minority ethnic group food habits would be incomplete without including the Chinese who have a food culture very different from the indigenous culture; a food culture which has remained virtually unchanged, regardless of the period of time spent in Britain. From the beginning the Chinese have been involved in the catering industry and although very nearly every High Street in the country has a Chinese restaurant or take‐away food shop, the majority know very little about the Chinese or the role of food in Chinese culture.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 83 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1991

The British Nutrition Foundation (BNF) is arranging a competition and colloquium for young research scientists to mark its Silver Jubilee in 1992. The colloquium will be held at…

Abstract

The British Nutrition Foundation (BNF) is arranging a competition and colloquium for young research scientists to mark its Silver Jubilee in 1992. The colloquium will be held at the Royal College of Physicians in London on 7 July 1992.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 91 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Book part
Publication date: 19 August 2021

Vickie Coleman Gallagher, Lisa E. Baranik, Maria Hamdani, Sorin Valcea, Pakanat Kiratikosolrak and Anthony R. Wheeler

Multidimensional fit (MDF) has been coined as “elusive” and relevant to an individual’s social identity and self-concept, unfolding over time as individuals assess their fit…

Abstract

Multidimensional fit (MDF) has been coined as “elusive” and relevant to an individual’s social identity and self-concept, unfolding over time as individuals assess their fit relative to Person-Organization, Person-Vocation, Person-Job, and Person-Team Fit. In this chapter, the literature as it relates to the refugee employment journey, MDF, and HRM practices that facilitate or inhibit MDF is reviewed. Furthermore, in this study, the process-oriented view of the refuge path highlights the complexity of their experience, noting an array of antecedents as they relate to country, host country and individual differences, interventions through NGOs, refugee resettlement agencies, and organizations, as well as the less explored entrepreneurial path. These diverse paths and the process of finding fit, and the obstacles refugees face, are viewed through the lens of shocks and reassessment of MDF throughout their journey. Finally, the study’s outcomes illustrate individual wellbeing factors, organizational level benefits, as well as community level benefits to MDF.

Article
Publication date: 17 September 2019

Taeshik Gong and Chen-Ya Wang

Dysfunctional customer behavior is believed to engender employee stress and, in turn, fuel employee turnover. However, little research has examined the moderating role of…

1018

Abstract

Purpose

Dysfunctional customer behavior is believed to engender employee stress and, in turn, fuel employee turnover. However, little research has examined the moderating role of individual-level and contextual-level resource variables. The purpose of this paper is to fill these gaps by examining employee embeddedness and individualism–collectivism as putative moderators of the hypothesized mediation chain.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted a field study involving 264 service employees working in two hotels operated by the same international hotel chain, one in South Korea (n=138) and the other in the UK (n=126).

Findings

Results show that employee embeddedness weakens the impact of dysfunctional customer behavior on employee turnover via employee stress. In addition, findings suggest that collectivists (individualists) are more (less) likely to be receptive to embeddedness cues.

Originality/value

This is the first known study to show that employee embeddedness can mitigate the impact of dysfunctional customer behavior on turnover via employee stress. This moderated-mediation model is further moderated by employees’ cultural value orientation (individualism–collectivism). Prior literature is not explicit on these complex models.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 14 October 2022

Caitlin Cavanagh, Erica Dalzell, Alyssa LaBerge and Elizabeth Cauffman

Greater parental monitoring is commonly associated with reduced delinquent behavior in adolescents, yet less is known about the extent to which parental monitoring behavior…

Abstract

Greater parental monitoring is commonly associated with reduced delinquent behavior in adolescents, yet less is known about the extent to which parental monitoring behavior changes after a child is arrested for the first time. The present study examines the extent to which mothers’ monitoring behaviors (i.e., parental monitoring knowledge and effort) change in association with juvenile recidivism after their sons’ first arrest, operationalized through both youth-reported recidivism and official re-arrest records. Mother–son dyads (total N = 634) across three states were interviewed in two waves over 30 months following the youth’s first arrest. Mothers who reported both more monitoring knowledge and effort at Wave 1 had sons who self-reported less recidivism and were less likely to be re-arrested at Wave 2. Repeated sons’ re-arrests were associated with a change in mothers’ monitoring behavior, as both parental knowledge and parental effort significantly increased from Wave 1 to Wave 2 when youth have been re-arrested more than once, relative to youth who had never been re-arrested. No change in monitoring behaviors were observed in association with youth-reported recidivism, and mothers who stated an intention to change their monitoring habits at Wave 1 did not necessarily do so by Wave 2. The findings point to the ability of parents to modulate their monitoring behavior to respond to chronic juvenile offending. This provide an opportunity for practitioners to work with parents to improve their monitoring skills, to ensure rehabilitative gains that result from justice system intervention are maintained in the home via parental monitoring.

Details

The Justice System and the Family: Police, Courts, and Incarceration
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80382-360-7

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 25 October 2021

Erica Jayne Friedman

Through scholarly personal narrative (Nash, 2004), this chapter outlines a multifaceted approach to creating safer brave spaces for queer and trans students within a predominantly…

Abstract

Through scholarly personal narrative (Nash, 2004), this chapter outlines a multifaceted approach to creating safer brave spaces for queer and trans students within a predominantly Hispanic-serving, public research university with a mainly commuter student population in South Florida. All spaces require courageous acts of authenticity on the part of its occupants. Thus, the creation of safer brave spaces is acknowledged as a practice since safety is an ideal to be worked toward especially for those with less power and privilege, such as queer and trans people as opposed to straight and cisgender people. Experiences of heterosexism and cisgenderism are positively associated with psychological distress among queer and trans college students (Goldberg, Kuvalanka, & Black, 2019; Sue, 2010; Woodford, Kulick, Sinco, & Hong, 2014). Research suggests empowerment and the acquisition of power is a positive coping mechanism for resisting and overcoming experiences of heterosexism and cisgenderism (Mizock, 2017; Nadal, Davidoff, Davis, & Wong, 2014; Todoroff, 1995). Administrators are called upon to mindfully create spaces that empower queer and trans students. Quick tips throughout the chapter highlight that queer and trans students should be given opportunities to determine their own risks, choose their own mentors, create their own spaces, have their own voices centered, realize their own solutions, fail and learn from setbacks, and deconstruct systems of power. At the University level, administrators should work to educate and change policies that further support students' opportunities to courageously exist and persist authentically in spaces across the university as a whole and not just in designated centers.

Details

Re-conceptualizing Safe Spaces
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-250-6

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 15 November 2005

Abstract

Details

Lessons in Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-253-5

1 – 10 of 19