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Book part
Publication date: 22 August 2006

Richard C. Hunter

Parent involvement is a major component of several school reform initiatives, including the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 commonly referred to as Title I…

Abstract

Parent involvement is a major component of several school reform initiatives, including the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 commonly referred to as Title I. Parent involvement is also an important provision in the latest reauthorization of the Leave No Child Behind Act (NCLB) of 2001, PL 107-110. Important research on parent involvement is presented in this chapter. Also, a brief discussion of the role parent involvement has played in several important school reform initiatives, such as decentralization, community control, and compensatory education are discussed. Finally, specific recommendations are given for school leaders, superintendents, and principals, on how to use parent involvement to help schools and students make Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP), a requirement of NCLB.

Details

No Child Left Behind and other Federal Programs for Urban School Districts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-299-3

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Article
Publication date: 28 July 2021

Sanne Holvoet, Liselot Hudders and Laura Herrewijn

This study aims to explore whether parents perceive themselves as responsible for helping their teenage children (aged 13–17 years) cope with the persuasive effects of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore whether parents perceive themselves as responsible for helping their teenage children (aged 13–17 years) cope with the persuasive effects of personalized advertising and the related process of online data collection. In addition, this study aims to examine how this parental responsibility is shaped.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey among parents (N = 354) of teenagers between the ages of 13 and 17 years was conducted.

Findings

Exploratory analyses showed that parents are highly concerned about their teens’ exposure to personalized advertising and online data collection, and that they consider themselves and the commercial companies behind these practices as responsible for protecting teenagers. Furthermore, the study showed that parents who believe that their children have higher levels of media skills presume less negative and more positive influences of personalized advertising on their children. The presumed negative influences increase parental concerns and responsibility, while presumed positive influences decrease parental concerns and responsibility.

Originality/value

Most previous studies on personalized advertising and online data collection were conducted among the teenagers themselves or discussed the regulatory framework concerning this topic. This study, however, focuses on one of the most important socialization agents that could help teenagers cope with these practices. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is one of the first studies to examine parents’ views regarding personalized advertising targeting teenagers and it provides insights in how parents perceive their own responsibility.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

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Content available
Article
Publication date: 5 November 2020

Lana Lučić, Tihana Brkljačić and Andreja Brajša-Žganec

Social distancing and school closures have changed the lives of many parents around the globe. In addition to these problems, parents of children with developmental…

Abstract

Purpose

Social distancing and school closures have changed the lives of many parents around the globe. In addition to these problems, parents of children with developmental difficulties (DD) have faced additional stressors that make them even more susceptible to higher stress levels and the onset or worsening of anxiety or depression. Consequentially, these stressors may have an indirect effect on parental functioning and children with DD owing to the spillover effect.

Design/methodology/approach

The purpose of this paper is to draw attention to parents of children with DD through an overview of possible additional stressors that have appeared during the coronavirus pandemic in Croatia. In writing this viewpoint paper, three sources were consulted: official state documents, communication with professionals (e.g. speech therapists) and online support groups for parents of children with DD.

Findings

Restrictive measures during the lockdown led to a lack of both formal and informal support for parents of children with DD. Moreover, the possibility of infection led to higher levels of fear among these parents; children with DD also encountered problems coping with both the restrictive measures and the demands of distance learning.

Practical implications

This paper may present a good starting point for both governments and NGOs when discussing and planning further advancement in the quality of response to the COVID-19 pandemic and a “recovery” response after the crisis. This overview may provide better insight into COVID-19–related consequences among parents of children with DD, which is vital to increasing the effectiveness of future measures and actions.

Originality/value

Although some negative effects of the pandemic on children have already been discussed by several authors, little attention has been paid to parents, and even less so to parents of children with DD. This paper may even represent a pioneering work in exploring the consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic on this population group.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

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Article
Publication date: 8 July 2021

Huifeng Bai, Weijing He, Jin Shi, Julie McColl and Christopher Moore

This empirical research, adopting an international retailing perspective, aims to examine the parenting advantages offered by emerging market multinationals (EMNCs) in…

Abstract

Purpose

This empirical research, adopting an international retailing perspective, aims to examine the parenting advantages offered by emerging market multinationals (EMNCs) in luxury fashion retail sector.

Design/methodology/approach

The researchers adopted a qualitative case study, and the qualitative data were collected through ten semi-structured interviews with senior managers.

Findings

It is a win–win situation for the EMNCs as parent groups of Western luxury fashion brands, as the EMNCs can access critical assets including advanced brand management expertise, retailing know-how, and the services skills needed for higher income consumers. Meanwhile, the subsidiary brands benefit from a high degree of autonomy, intra-group resource utilisation, a competitive brand portfolio and most importantly economies of scales in the value chain, particularly in production. The perceived risks of EMNCs ownership include potentially restricted autonomy and the uncertainty over corporate development activities in the future, as well as the risks of diluting brand image caused by the inconsistency between country of origin and country of ownership.

Research limitations/implications

Very few EMNCs have moved into luxury fashion retailing to date, which means that the sampling frame was small. The findings were generated from China, which is perceived to be of considerable psychic distance in terms of culture and policies compared to other emerging markets that have been heavily influenced by colonialism.

Practical implications

This paper suggests that practitioners, particularly EMNCs, support their subsidiary luxury fashion brands through parenting advantages and develop their own high-end fashion brands through internationalisation.

Originality/value

This empirical study contributes to the current international retailing literature by offering in depth insights of parenting advantages offered by EMNCs in luxury fashion retailing. It also enriches the EMNC literature, which has mainly adopted an international business scope, by extending this understanding into luxury fashion retailing.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 25 June 2021

Supreet Kaur and Satinder Kumar

The present study investigates the antecedents of sharenting, underlying strategies to mitigate the privacy risks of sharing children's personally identifiable information…

Abstract

Purpose

The present study investigates the antecedents of sharenting, underlying strategies to mitigate the privacy risks of sharing children's personally identifiable information (PII) and majorly explores the relationship between sharenting activities of the parents and their buying behaviour. The study corroborates the previous studies in an advanced manner and adds a new construct “sherub marketing” as an effective marketing tool to impact the buying decisions of the parents.

Design/methodology/approach

Following interpretative phenomenological analysis, semi-structured personal interviews were conducted towards actively engaged parents on social media. For inferential analysis, responses of 23 parents were analysed with the help of theoretical thematic analysis

Findings

The findings uncover the multifaceted reasons persisting behind sharenting activities of the parents and observe a strong relationship between sharenting and buying behaviour of parents. The study results into exploration of sherub marketing as an effective marketing tool to influence the actions of the sharenters.

Practical implications

The study will be of use to both the practitioners and the society as a whole as it indicates the ramification of parental sharing and the role of marketers in influencing the purchasing decisions of the sharenters.

Originality/value

The present study is a novice and untapped area in the literature of interactive marketing and sheds light on sherub marketing as an effective marketing strategy.

Details

Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7122

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Article
Publication date: 9 July 2021

Irina Kuznetsova, Layla Garapshina and Laysan Mukharyamova

This paper aims to fill the gap in social sciences research on parents’ strategies in navigating preschool education in Russia. It focusses on the barriers that children…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to fill the gap in social sciences research on parents’ strategies in navigating preschool education in Russia. It focusses on the barriers that children with developmental disabilities and autism face in preschool education in Russia and highlights the emerging facilitators of inclusive education.

Design/methodology/approach

It uses a modified labelling approach analysing strategies of withdrawal and resistance. The research included semi-structured interviews with parents of children with Down syndrome, Rett syndrome and autism spectrum disorders (ASD) in 2013–2014 and 2018–2019 and semi-structured interviews with professionals in Tatarstan, Russia. The data analysis was based on constructivist methods and grounded theory.

Findings

Although Russian law guarantees equal access to education for every child and requires the development of inclusive education, children with developmental disabilities, including autism, are often stigmatised at the preschool stage, both in special needs and mainstream institutions. Parents use various strategies to navigate access to preschool education and try more than one strategy from secrecy and withdrawal to resistance. Parents challenged the mainstream educational structures in Kazan and established groups for children with autism in some mainstream kindergartens and classes in mainstream schools.

Research limitations/implications

There should be informational support for parents with different options for special needs education, providing integrative and inclusive education. It is necessary to increase the number of trained specialists in special needs and mainstream kindergartens in Russia for children with developmental disabilities and ASD. More study is required to overcome stigmatisation and increase tolerance towards persons with developmental disabilities in Russia both on a national and local level.

Practical implications

The research findings can be useful for countries which have recently recognised ASD and do not have inclusive preschool educational practices and where labelling towards children with developmental disabilities is still common. The study recommends that resources are required to provide free or affordable preschool education for children with developmental disabilities. It is also crucial to help parents navigate preschool education and select the best options for each child’s needs.

Social implications

This study’s findings add value to the importance of addressing the stigma towards people with disabilities within professional groups and broader society, which form barriers for preschool education and in some cases result in withdrawal from preschool education. To overcome the stigmatisation of children with developmental disabilities in preschool education, it is necessary to establish modern targeted pedagogical approaches and training for professionals and informational campaigns for the broader audience.

Originality/value

The paper is novel as there was no sociological research into preschool education of children with developmental disabilities in Russia. It argues that the parents’ experiences are much broader than just interactions with special needs or mainstream education. Parents navigate across special needs institutions, specialised groups in mainstream and private kindergartens, mixed groups in mainstream kindergartens and home education with various strategies from secrecy and withdrawal to resistance and challenge. Preschool education for children with developmental disabilities in Russia is hindered by a lack of professional resources and the stigma embedded into professional and societal responses.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

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Article
Publication date: 3 July 2021

Julie Kellershohn, Keith Walley and Frank Vriesekoop

This study aims to examine peer perceptions of a parent dining in a fast-food restaurant with their child.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine peer perceptions of a parent dining in a fast-food restaurant with their child.

Design/methodology/approach

A vignette approach was used to explore consumer assumptions and normative data using a four-country online survey of parents, with 1,200 respondents (300 from each of Australia, Canada, the UK and the USA). The study included qualitative and quantitative thematic analyses of the responses.

Findings

Family dining in fast-food restaurants was most often associated with an opportunity for family time together (25%), a treat (25%) and an unhealthy food decision (19%). For some, this is a normal meal that should not be judged (11%), for others, this is merely a meal of easy convenience (9%). Fathers, when depicted as the parent in the vignette, were more likely to be praised for spending time with their children, while mothers were more likely to be critiqued for making poor nutritional choices. Respondents from the USA viewed fast-food family dining more favourably than respondents from Australia, Canada or the UK.

Social implications

Despite rising obesity in these four countries, only 19% of respondents focused on the unhealthy element of the food choice, suggesting that perhaps this element is not on the forefront of consumer decision considerations.

Originality/value

This paper confirms parental peer perception differences, based on gender and country, regarding opinions on a child dining with a parent in a fast-food restaurant.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

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Article
Publication date: 9 July 2021

Bernard Kissi-Abrokwah and Kwame Kodua-Ntim

The purpose of this paper is to identify knowledge sharing practices used among parents with children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify knowledge sharing practices used among parents with children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

Design/methodology/approach

The study was based on qualitative philosophical foundations, where phenomenological case study design was used to make an in-depth understanding of how parents whose children are diagnosed with ASD shared knowledge among themselves. The population for this research consists of parents whose children have been diagnosed with ASD in Ghana. The study sampled for the study was 12 parents and was selected from 4 autism awareness centres in Ghana to obtain data through the use of focus group discussion and analysed with the aid of thematic analysis.

Findings

The study showed that the dimensions of knowledge sharing practices used by parents with autistic children were after-action review/lesson learnt, brainstorming, mentoring, coaching system, discussion forum, face-to-face meeting, documentation, peer assistance and storytelling. Finally, the study also revealed that knowledge sharing practices used by parents with autistic children help them in their daily engagement.

Social implications

An aspect of the training of social workers should focus on how to assist parents, family and neighbours of children with ASD. The government through the needed ministries and agencies should create a social support system to assist parents and families with children with ASD. Counsellors should avail their services to parents with children with ASD as early as possible to avoid or ameliorate some of the emotional and psychological challenges of these parents.

Originality/value

The paper offers a comprehensive overview on how knowledge sharing transforms the individual to learn and accept autistic condition in Ghana.

Details

Advances in Autism, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3868

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1996

Virginia Blakey and Jane Frankland

Finds research shows that while parents are potentially an important source of information and support to their children on sexual issues, in practice many parents feel…

Abstract

Finds research shows that while parents are potentially an important source of information and support to their children on sexual issues, in practice many parents feel that they lack the skills and confidence to play a direct role in these matters. Presents findings from a pilot project undertaken by Health Promotion Wales and FPA Cymru to enhance parents’ sex education skills. Details a series of workshops which were run for groups of parents with differing needs in relation to their children’s sex education. Describes how participants took part in pre‐workshop interviews to identify their concerns and in post‐workshop interviews to assess the impact of the workshops. Presents findings from the workshop evaluations, together with some lessons learned from the project. Advises that the long‐term outcome of the project, a resource pack on sex education for parents, is now available.

Details

Health Education, vol. 96 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 9 April 2019

Timothy Galpin

The gap between management theory and practice has been much criticized. To help bridge the divide, a synthesis of empirical, theoretical and practice literature is…

Abstract

Purpose

The gap between management theory and practice has been much criticized. To help bridge the divide, a synthesis of empirical, theoretical and practice literature is offered, along with an application of the widely used VRIO framework, to contend that developing a focused corporate parenting approach as a core competence serves as a source of competitive advantage for diversified companies.

Design/methodology/approach

A synthesis of empirical, theoretical and practice literature is presented, beginning with a discussion of why and how firms diversify; the relative performance of firms that pursue related and unrelated diversification; an application of the resource-based view, core competencies and the VRIO framework; a description of focused corporate parenting as a core competency; a prescription for how diversified firms can implement a focused corporate parenting approach; and implications for research.

Findings

Developing a focused corporate parenting approach as a core competence serves as a source of competitive advantage for diversified companies.

Research limitations/implications

The synthesis of empirical, theoretical and practice literature presented provides a foundation for future research into the impact of focused corporate parenting on diversified firm performance.

Practical implications

The paper includes a prescription for how diversified firms can implement a focused corporate parenting approach.

Originality/value

The application of the resource-based view and core competency theories to corporate parenting provides managers with the rationale for and methodology to focus their corporate parenting activities.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 40 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

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