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Book part
Publication date: 25 November 2021

Rebecca J. Collie

A vast and comprehensive body of research highlights the importance of motivation for academic outcomes. More recently, researchers and educators are increasingly becoming…

Abstract

A vast and comprehensive body of research highlights the importance of motivation for academic outcomes. More recently, researchers and educators are increasingly becoming aware of the importance of motivation for social and emotional outcomes. In the current chapter, it is argued that motivation is a core component of social and emotional competence because such competence must be actively and willfully applied to have a positive impact on the individual and those around them. Motivation is essential for this application. In this chapter, three well-known motivation constructs are presented as playing a role in promoting positive social and emotional outcomes: social goals, growth mindsets, and autonomous motivation. Then, attention is narrowed down to an in-depth consideration of autonomous motivation and its role in a recently developed conceptual model that articulates the instructional, motivational, and behavioral factors and processes implicated in social and emotional development (Collie, 2020). The conceptual model highlights that instructional practices promote students' perceptions (of autonomy, competence, and relatedness) and, in turn, their autonomous motivation and enactment of socially and emotionally competent behaviors. The chapter concludes with implications for practice and research.

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2015

Line Nielsen, Charlotte Meilstrup, Malene Kubstrup Nelausen, Vibeke Koushede and Bjørn Evald Holstein

Within the framework of Health Promoting Schools Up is an intervention using a whole school approach aimed at promoting mental health by strengthening social and emotional

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Abstract

Purpose

Within the framework of Health Promoting Schools Up is an intervention using a whole school approach aimed at promoting mental health by strengthening social and emotional competence among schoolchildren. Social and emotional competence is an integral part of many school-based mental health interventions but only a minority of interventions measure changes in competences. The purpose of this paper is to present the intervention Up and document changes in social and emotional competence among schoolchildren before and after the intervention.

Design/methodology/approach

Up consists of four components: education and activities for schoolchildren; development of staff skills; involvement of parents; and initiatives in everyday life at school. Up was implemented in two Danish schools in 2010-2011. Social and emotional competence was measured among 11-15-year old schoolchildren before (response rate 96.2 per cent, n=589) and after (response rate 83.9 per cent, n=532) the intervention.

Findings

Changes in level of social competence were assessed by the prevalence of a high level of social and emotional competence before (33.3 per cent) and after (40.8 per cent) the intervention (p-value=0.01).

Research limitations/implications

Up provides valuable experiences for adapting evidence-based mental health promotion to the Danish school system which is characterized by democracy, autonomy and inclusion. Future research should study the implementation and effect of Up in larger scale studies.

Practical implications

The comprehensive description of Up serves as important information for policymakers and practitioners working with mental health promotion.

Originality/value

The whole school approach intervention Up has the potential to promote social and emotional competence and reduce socioeconomic differences in social and emotional competence among schoolchildren.

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Article
Publication date: 24 March 2020

Volkan Genc and Meryem Akoglan Kozak

The purpose of this paper is to provide guidance regarding the satisfaction of customer needs in the competitive restaurant industry. Restaurants have seen a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide guidance regarding the satisfaction of customer needs in the competitive restaurant industry. Restaurants have seen a transformation in employees’ labor, changing from primarily physical and mental to emotional and aesthetic dimensions. In this study, the effect of managers’ emotional and social competence (ESC) on the aesthetic labor of service and kitchen employees has been investigated.

Design/methodology/approach

Empirical data was collected from employees and managers of a restaurant chain. Structural equation modeling was the main analytical tool used to assess the results.

Findings

The findings indicated that managers’ ESC affected the aesthetic labor of their service (aesthetic traits (AT), aesthetic requirements and service encounters) and kitchen (AT, aesthetic creativity and aesthetic harmony ) employees. Achievement orientation and adaptability were among the dimensions of emotional competence that contributed the most to aesthetic labor. The most significant elements of social competence were inspiring leadership and conflict management.

Practical implications

The study suggests that managers can improve the aesthetic performance of their employees by using their ESC.

Originality/value

This is the first study of this kind to include kitchen employees while considering the effects of restaurant managers’ ESC on aesthetic labor. The findings indicate the importance of the ESC of managers in improving the aesthetic labor of employees.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 17 September 2009

Lisa Chauveron and Daniel Perkins

Empirically‐based programmes are the cornerstone of the prevention science field. Beyond curriculum content and design, several aspects of school‐based prevention and

Abstract

Empirically‐based programmes are the cornerstone of the prevention science field. Beyond curriculum content and design, several aspects of school‐based prevention and intervention programmes have been found to contribute to their effectiveness, including implementer training, programme fidelity and principal [head teacher] support. The current investigation examined whether the degree of heterogeneity among classroom members (ie. students' racial or ethnic backgrounds, students' neighbourhood socio‐economic status (SES), students' neighbourhood education level and students' neighbourhood immigrant status) influences the effectiveness of the Promoting Alternative Thinking Strategies (PATHS) social and emotional learning programme. The analyses found a relationship between the degree of classroom heterogeneity and students' pre‐test scores on social and emotional variables. Moreover, gender differences were evident on pre‐test scores, reflecting differential baselines. The findings for analysis on classroom heterogeneity as a moderator of the programme's effectiveness in improving students' social and emotional competence were mixed. Future research and policy implications are discussed related to advancing the field and ensuring culturally relevant evidence‐based programming.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

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Book part
Publication date: 8 June 2020

Richard Majors, Llewellyn E. Simmons and Cornelius Ani

Black males often are raised in poverty, exposed to violence and toxic environments that create different levels of trauma that can cause social emotional problems which…

Abstract

Black males often are raised in poverty, exposed to violence and toxic environments that create different levels of trauma that can cause social emotional problems which lead to mental health problems. These problems along with a lack of adequate relationships with teachers can affect their schooling and attainment. No wonder, black males often suffer disproportionately from poor achievement, high suspension, exclusions, and drop-out rates. Young people who struggle in school often lack the social and emotional skills (or “soft skills”) needed to succeed academically, deal with anger, make sound choices, and handle challenging situations constructively, ethically, and manage behaviors that prevent them from being suspended/excluded from school. It does not help that teachers who are often afraid of them, and do not know how to relate to them and lack emotional literacy (EL) themselves. Unfortunately, because of these challenges schools will often place black males in special education classes.

There is a cognitive/non-cognitive divide in education. Most of the school curriculum/pedagogy focus on cognitive aspects of education/learning (e.g., memory-based education) when compared to non-cognitive aspects of learning (social and emotional skills/learning). If our young people are to realize their full potential in our schools, it is crucial we begin educating the “whole child” and increase social and emotional provisions in our schools. It is the cognitive and non-cognitive aspects of learning combined that make young people successful. We need a new educational paradigm/mind shift. After all, educating the whole child makes good sense of course, all learning has an emotional base.

While there has been a proliferation of social and emotional learning programs in schools in recent years, social and emotional learning programs that focus on black males and cultural competence are limited. Therefore, we propose a new framework for social and emotional development/learning model for black males that focus on cultural competence. Our EL/cultural competence model is called teacher empathy, which focuses on relationship black males have with their teachers and therefore focuses on both the pupil/student EL and the teachers. The aim/goal of our model/curriculum is to: improve academic performance, motivate and help both black males and teachers, regulate and manage their behaviors more effectively, and reduce suspensions, exclusions, and drop-outs.

Details

The International Handbook of Black Community Mental Health
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-965-6

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Article
Publication date: 31 May 2019

Susanne Ayers Denham and Hideko Hamada Bassett

Emotional competence supports preschoolers’ social relationships and school success. Parents’ emotions and reactions to preschoolers’ emotions can help them become…

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Abstract

Purpose

Emotional competence supports preschoolers’ social relationships and school success. Parents’ emotions and reactions to preschoolers’ emotions can help them become emotionally competent, but scant research corroborates this role for preschool teachers. Expected outcomes included: teachers’ emotion socialization behaviors functioning most often like parents’ in contributing to emotional competence, with potential moderation by socioeconomic risk. This paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants included 80 teachers and 312 preschoolers experiencing either little economic difficulty or socioeconomic risk. Children’s emotionally negative/dysregulated, emotionally regulated/productive and emotionally positive/prosocial behaviors were observed, and their emotion knowledge was assessed in Fall and Spring. Teachers’ emotions and supportive, nonsupportive and positively emotionally responsive reactions to children’s emotions were observed during Winter. Hierarchical linear models used teacher emotions or teacher reactions, risk and their interactions as predictors, controlling for child age, gender and premeasures.

Findings

Some results resembled those parents’: positive emotional environments supported children’s emotion knowledge; lack of nonsupportive reactions facilitated positivity/prosociality. Others were unique to preschool classroom environments (e.g. teachers’ anger contributed to children’s emotion regulation/productive involvement; nonsupportiveness predicted less emotional negativity/dysregulation). Finally, several were specific to children experiencing socioeconomic risk: supportive and nonsupportive reactions, as well as tender emotions, had unique, but culturally/contextually explainable, meanings in their classrooms.

Research limitations/implications

Applications to teacher professional development, and both limitations and suggestions for future research are considered.

Originality/value

This study is among the first to examine how teachers contribute to the development of preschoolers’ emotional competence, a crucial set of skills for life success.

Details

Journal of Research in Innovative Teaching & Learning, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2397-7604

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Article
Publication date: 25 September 2019

Isabel Quintillán and Iñaki Peña-Legazkue

The purpose of this paper is to identify the factors related to entrepreneurs’ emotional intelligence that trigger the choice of venture internationalization after locally…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the factors related to entrepreneurs’ emotional intelligence that trigger the choice of venture internationalization after locally suffering the shock of an economic recession in a developing economy.

Design/methodology/approach

The primary survey data were collected from 226 Uruguayan entrepreneurs and included their psychological traits and human capital characteristics after the most recent global financial crash of 2008. Personal interviews were conducted, and a “Trait Meta-Mood Scale” instrument (i.e. TMMS-12) was specifically designed for the measurement of emotional intelligence. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to test the hypotheses.

Findings

This study demonstrates that in disadvantaged environments, such as developing regions suffering from a severe global crisis, the early internationalization process of a new firm is mainly triggered by entrepreneurs’ emotional intelligence attributes rather than conventional human capital-related attributes. Moreover, socialemotional competences are more significant than personal–emotional competences to explain entrepreneurs’ exporting behaviour in such an adverse context.

Originality/value

The effect of emotional intelligence on venture internationalization is investigated in situations in which entrepreneurs are pressured to pursue risk-bearing strategies, pushed by a disrupting shock that weakens the national economic condition (e.g. an economic recession). While previous findings have highlighted the importance of entrepreneurs’ human capital attributes in their entering foreign markets, few studies have analysed how the emotional intelligence competences of entrepreneurs lead them to internationalize. This study fills this gap in the literature on entrepreneurial behaviour by focussing on the emotional, cognitive and psychological qualities of entrepreneurs to explain their exporting business decisions.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 28 August 2020

Heini Ikävalko, Päivi Hökkä, Susanna Paloniemi and Katja Vähäsantanen

The study investigated emotional competence at work and elaborated emotional competence in relation to sociocultural aspects of emotions at work.

Abstract

Purpose

The study investigated emotional competence at work and elaborated emotional competence in relation to sociocultural aspects of emotions at work.

Design/methodology/approach

Emotional competence at work was explored via interviews, surveys and observations. The study was conducted over one year, during which an emotion-training intervention was conducted within a medium-sized company, operating in the healthcare sector.

Findings

The study shed light on emotional competence at work, identifying three domains: individual emotional competence, emotional competence within interactions and emotional competence embedded in workplace practices.

Research limitations/implications

This study was conducted in one organization.

Practical implications

Organizational developers are recommended to implement activities such as training interventions in order to build emotional competence; this applies not only at the individual level but also to achieve interaction among members of the organization within collective workplace practices.

Originality/value

Previous studies on emotional competence have been limited to the individual level. The sociocultural approach to emotional competence adopted in this study recognizes – in addition to the individual and interactional level of emotional competenceemotional competence at work as related to practices at work.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 33 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Book part
Publication date: 25 November 2021

Vanessa Kurdi, Mireille Joussemet and Geneviève A. Mageau

This chapter explores how self-determination theory (SDT; Ryan & Deci, 2000, 2017), an empirical theory about human motivation and personality, aligns with principles and

Abstract

This chapter explores how self-determination theory (SDT; Ryan & Deci, 2000, 2017), an empirical theory about human motivation and personality, aligns with principles and practices of social and emotional learning (SEL) within the school context. Through its emphasis on basic psychological needs (BPN) for autonomy, competence, and relatedness, SDT proposes a broad perspective on how the social context can facilitate the development of social and emotional skills, which complements SEL programs. Research anchored in SDT has indeed established that students' academic, social, and emotional skills are determined at least partly by the extent to which their BPN are fulfilled in their learning environment. SDT also brings attention to the motivation and goals underlying the teaching and learning of social and emotional skills. Although SDT-based interventions mainly target the school or the classroom climate rather than students' skills, they can also foster the development of the five core social and emotional competencies defined by CASEL (2005). Implications and future directions for practices and research integrating SDT-based principles and interventions within SEL programs and practices are discussed.

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Book part
Publication date: 25 November 2021

Nicholas Yoder and Alexandra Skoog-Hoffman

The need for social and emotional learning (SEL) has never been so clear. The growing understanding of its benefits has been made more evident by the stronger focus of…

Abstract

The need for social and emotional learning (SEL) has never been so clear. The growing understanding of its benefits has been made more evident by the stronger focus of state, district, and school leaders, educators, and families to leverage SEL as a strategy to promote emotional well-being, to combat systemic and interpersonal inequities, and to engage students in positive learning environments. With this urgency to use SEL practices, now is the time to ensure a focus on creating environments and experiences that promote social and emotional development and deepening understanding of the motivational factors that promote student and adult success. Motivation researchers have been studying the motivational elements – and associated interventions – that better equip youth and adults to engage in their learning environments, suggesting the importance that the two fields learn with and from each other. The introductory chapter of the volume, Motivating the SEL Field Forward Through Equity, explores the intersections and accelerators of the two fields to create optimal learning environments and experiences for all youth. Specifically, we provide a high-level overview of the two fields, including ways each field takes into account personal development in relation to context and culture. We further explore ways in which the two fields intersect, elevating the importance of understanding the role of equity and excellence in research and practice. We then focus on one approach that we believe elevates equity of voice in research – research–practice partnerships. Finally, we highlight how this volume is organized.

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