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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

Louise Rowling and Vicki Jeffreys

Schools are recognised as key settings for health promotion. This has resulted in resources being allocated specifically for the development of Health Promoting Schools

Abstract

Schools are recognised as key settings for health promotion. This has resulted in resources being allocated specifically for the development of Health Promoting Schools. If the existing level of resourcing is to continue, mechanisms for monitoring the effectiveness of Health Promoting Schools need to be designed that are appropriate for the concept. Currently, there is an emphasis on evidence‐based practice, but the difficulty lies in determining what is acceptable as evidence in the context of Health Promoting Schools, and what are the most appropriate methods for collecting this evidence. The disease‐prevention approach, with its emphasis on controlled trials and discrete outcomes is not appropriate. New models must be developed that reflect the multi‐variant and dynamic nature of the processes involved. Outlines principles that could guide this work and includes consideration of the some key health‐promotion principles, including equity, consultation, collaboration, ownership and sustainability, linking these with some newer concepts, such as capacity building and social capital, which are proving useful in the development, monitoring and evaluation of Health Promoting Schools.

Details

Health Education, vol. 100 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2000

Vivian Barnekow Rasmussen and David Rivett

Operating within the “settings” approach of the Ottawa Charter, the European Network of Health Promoting Schools has, since its launch in 1992, been the most powerful…

Abstract

Operating within the “settings” approach of the Ottawa Charter, the European Network of Health Promoting Schools has, since its launch in 1992, been the most powerful catalyst for the development of the healthpromoting school concept across Europe. Founded on a partnership between the European Union, Council of Europe and the World Health Organization, it is now established in 40 countries right across Europe. Its principles have been determined by a range of key meetings, conferences and documents, while the evaluation of its practice increasingly suggests that it is highly effective. The network is based on the principles of empowerment, partnership, democracy, equity, action competence and sustainability, and sees key areas for action as being teacher education, links with parents and the community, and evaluation, to move health promotion in schools on to a sound evidence base. Targets for the future development of the network include extending it to the few remaining countries that still fall outside it, and the widespread dissemination of its learning and goals, so that every child in Europe can have the benefits of being educated in a healthpromoting school.

Details

Health Education, vol. 100 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2000

David Stears

Highlights the challenge of evaluating the healthy or healthpromoting school and describes the development of an instrument for profiling and monitoring the development…

Abstract

Highlights the challenge of evaluating the healthy or healthpromoting school and describes the development of an instrument for profiling and monitoring the development of such institutions. The adaptability and scope of the instrument is discussed at length and this includes use of the instrument to undertake valuations of existing health‐promotion assets within schools and evaluation of the healthpromoting school. Examples of how the instrument has been used, both nationally and internationally, are provided. A detailed description of the methodology introduces the notion of profiling the healthpromoting/healthy school, and healthpromoting assets in schools, using a multiple‐axes radial profile graph. Discusses the challenges of creating an evaluation instrument that recognises the practical difficulties of undertaking evaluation in schools, the complex nature of the healthpromoting school, and the underlying principles of evaluating health promotion.

Details

Health Education, vol. 100 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2001

Albert Lee, Kwong‐ka Tsang, Shiu‐hung Lee, Cho‐yee To and Ting‐fai Kwan

The development of a Health Promoting School concept in Hong Kong has faced many challenges, as in other countries. However, there is strong evidence from research…

Abstract

The development of a Health Promoting School concept in Hong Kong has faced many challenges, as in other countries. However, there is strong evidence from research findings that there is a need for this development to promote the health of young people effectively. Strategies are currently being developed in Hong Kong to address the key issues and challenges inherent in developing Health Promoting Schools. They include work on teacher training, funding and resources, policy making, the re‐orientation of the education system, participation by the community and parents, and the formation of healthy alliances. All these issues need to be addressed before a school‐based health promotion programme can be developed further. This paper describes current strategies being used by the authors of this paper to tackle these issues to develop a more comprehensive Health Promoting School programme in Hong Kong.

Details

Health Education, vol. 101 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 23 October 2007

Fiona Rowe, Donald Stewart and Carla Patterson

The purpose of this paper is to develop a framework to demonstrate the contribution of whole school approaches embodied by the healthpromoting school approach, to the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a framework to demonstrate the contribution of whole school approaches embodied by the healthpromoting school approach, to the promotion of school connectedness, defined as the cohesiveness between diverse groups in the school community, including students, families, school staff and the wider community.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross‐disciplinary review of literature was conducted to identify strategies consistent with the healthpromoting school approach and the values and principles that promote school connectedness. The review included peer‐reviewed articles and published books and reports identified from the databases spanning the education, health, social science and science disciplines and used search terms encompassing health and mental health promotion, schools, social connectedness, belonging and attachment. The paper is also a framework of the contribution of the healthpromoting school approach to promoting school connectedness and was developed drawing on health promotion strategies at the broader community level known to foster connectedness.

Findings

The paper found that the framework developed illustrates how the healthpromoting school approach has the potential to build school connectedness through two major mechanisms: inclusive processes that involve the diversity of members that make up a community; the active participation of community members and equal “power” relationships, or equal partnerships among community members; and supportive structures such as school policies, the way the school is organised and its physical environment, that reflect the values of participation, democracy and inclusiveness and/or that promote processes based on these values.

Practical implications

In this paper the detailed mechanisms outlined in the framework provide practical strategies for health promotion practitioners and educators to use in the everyday school setting to promote school connectedness.

Originality/value

This paper draws together substantial bodies of evidence and makes a persuasive case for the contribution of the healthpromoting school approach to building school connectedness.

Details

Health Education, vol. 107 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 30 August 2011

Oddrun Samdal and Louise Rowling

Efforts to create a scientific base for the healthpromoting school approach have so far not articulated a clear “Science of Delivery”. There is thus a need for systematic…

Abstract

Purpose

Efforts to create a scientific base for the healthpromoting school approach have so far not articulated a clear “Science of Delivery”. There is thus a need for systematic identification of clearly operationalised implementation components. To address a next step in the refinement of the healthpromoting schools' work, this paper sets out to delineate implementation components of healthpromoting schools and to identify their mechanisms.

Design/methodology/approach

The implementation components were identified through a narrative synthesis of documents describing implementation of healthpromoting school approaches. Studies were included if they were published between 1995 and June 2010 and could be identified in publicly accessible peer‐reviewed articles and grey literature, published in English. Eight sources were extracted, representing reports from all continents with the exception of Africa.

Findings

Eight components were identified: preparing and planning for school development; policy and institutional anchoring; professional development and learning; leadership and management practices; relational and organisational support context; student participation; partnerships and networking; and sustainability.

Practical implications

The components provide a practical tool/guide for schools to use in the implementation of healthpromoting schools. In a parallel paper theoretically and empirically based practice guidelines for the actual implementation of the components are articulated (“Filling the black box of implementation for healthpromoting schools”, this issue).

Originality/value

The identification of specified theory‐driven implementation components for healthpromoting schools aims will help practitioners to understand the function of each component, so they can execute them with fidelity and thus contribute to rigorous implementation of the healthpromoting school initiative.

Details

Health Education, vol. 111 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 17 February 2012

Venka Simovska

The editorial aims to provide a brief overview of the individual contributions to the special issue, and a commentary positioning the contributions within research…

Abstract

Purpose

The editorial aims to provide a brief overview of the individual contributions to the special issue, and a commentary positioning the contributions within research relating to the healthpromoting schools initiative in Europe.

Design/methodology/approach

The members of the Schools for Health in Europe Research Group were invited to submit their work addressing processes and outcomes in school health promotion to this special issue of Health Education. Additionally, an open call for papers was published on the Health Education web site. Following the traditional double blind peer review process, nine submissions were accepted for publication. Five of these are selected to be published in this issue and the rest will be published in a future issue of the journal.

Findings

The five articles in this issue take a comprehensive approach to health promotion in schools and reflect on the related processes and outcomes. Although diverse in focus and research methodology, the five contributions all emphasise that the question about the outcomes of the healthpromoting schools cannot, and should not be limited to narrowly defined health outcomes achieved through single health‐promotion interventions. Directly or indirectly the articles reiterate the idea that health promotion in schools needs to be linked with the core task of the school – education, and to the values inherent to education, such as inclusion, democracy, participation and influence, critical literacy and action competence in relation to health.

Originality/value

This special issue endorses the idea that health promotion in schools would do well to reconnect with the traditions of educational theory and to develop innovative forms of educational practices and interventions in the face of complex societal challenges concerning health and health promotion. It can be beneficial for stakeholders who work towards school based health promotion, assisting them in bridging the gap between health and education sector.

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2000

Jo Inchley, Candice Currie and Ian Young

The health promoting school concept is now a well‐established framework for the development of health promotion initiatives in schools. Increasingly, attention has focused…

Abstract

The health promoting school concept is now a well‐established framework for the development of health promotion initiatives in schools. Increasingly, attention has focused on the evaluation of school‐based health promotion and debate continues over appropriate evaluation designs for the school setting. The authors argue that the case study design provides a useful approach because of its ability to explore the real‐life complexities of social contexts using a combination of quantitative and qualitative methods, with a strong emphasis on process as well as outcome measures. The current ENHPS project in Scotland uses a multiple‐case study design to evaluate healthy eating initiatives in four schools, based on the principles of the health promoting school. Provides a description of the project and highlights the advantages of case study methodology in addressing key issues around effectiveness of school‐based health promotion based on the health promoting school concept.

Details

Health Education, vol. 100 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 February 2021

Pia Skott

The aim of this paper is to identify the role of the principal in establishing a whole school approach for health and wellbeing. Two questions are asked: (1) What do…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to identify the role of the principal in establishing a whole school approach for health and wellbeing. Two questions are asked: (1) What do successful Swedish principals do when they take on a whole school approach? (2) How do these results relate to previous research on successful school leadership?

Design/methodology/approach

This paper focuses on the complexity of organisational processes and considers the role of successful leadership in managing a whole school approach to health promotion. It presents findings from two different but interlinked projects, and draws on document studies and interviews with principals, student health team members and teachers in Sweden.

Findings

This paper argues that successful school leaders are crucial in establishing a whole school approach, because of the work they do to synchronise the health-promoting activities in schools. The study identifies four aspects of coordination that need to be enacted simultaneously when leading health-promoting processes. The fifth aspect identified is that a whole school approach is not limited to the school, but the whole local school context, i.e. a synchronisation between different system levels.

Originality/value

Although limited in scale, this paper reports key findings that could have practical implications for school leaders. The study suggests that successful school leadership research needs to use a health-promoting lens in order to make leadership practices health-promoting practices. It also proposes extended comparative research from different fields and contexts.

Details

Health Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 26 January 2021

Mehrangiz Sartipizadeh, Vahid Yazdi-Feyzabadi, Minoo Alipouri Sakha, Aein Zarrin, Mohammad Bazyar, Telma Zahirian Moghadam and Hamed Zandian

Health-promoting schools have been associated with improvements in the health status of students globally. This study is a secondary analysis study assessing Iranian HPSs.

Abstract

Purpose

Health-promoting schools have been associated with improvements in the health status of students globally. This study is a secondary analysis study assessing Iranian HPSs.

Design/methodology/approach

This was a cross-sectional study on routinely collected data using an external audit 63-item checklist, which was utilized to evaluate 440 HPSs between 2014 and 2017. The mean score for each of the checklists' components was calculated. Nonparametric tests were conducted to investigate the association between the presence of a school caregiver, students' educational level and the school's score.

Findings

While the number of five- and four-star schools increased significantly, one- to three-star schools declined. Providing clinical and counseling services had negative growth. Despite the steady growth of the staff's health, this category still had the lowest score among; on the contrary, physical activity had the highest score in 2017. The presence of a full-time school caregiver and middle schools were both significantly correlated with achieving higher scores (p < 0.005).

Originality/value

It seems that in addition to developing school facilities to promote physical activities, measures should be taken to promote access to counseling services, considering health issues of students and staff and finally increasing the number of full-time school caregiver

Details

Health Education, vol. 121 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

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