Search results

1 – 10 of 16
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Elaine L. Westbrooks

As digital resources proliferate, libraries plan to grant easy access to a distributed set of resources from one single entry point inside and outside the OPAC. The quest…

Abstract

Purpose

As digital resources proliferate, libraries plan to grant easy access to a distributed set of resources from one single entry point inside and outside the OPAC. The quest to manage the metadata about these resources becomes more important than ever. Thus, the term, “metadata management” is being used by various communities creating spatial data, enterprise applications, data warehouses, legacy environments, and bibliographic data. Unfortunately, metadata management is sparsely mentioned in the traditional information technology journals, grey literature, information technology company web sites, and the library science literature. The purpose of this viewpoint is to examine the limited use of the term metadata management in the library community and to introduce a new definition of it.

Design/methodology/approach

This viewpoint examines the limited use of the term metadata management in the library community and introduces a new definition of it.

Findings

Although the proposed definition captures the activities that libraries should be engaged as they provide access to millions of resources, this definition should constantly be examined as new technologies emerge, personnel change, and financial resources diminish.

Originality/value

The author's definition is a good start; however, to get to the complete definition of metadata management, a more comprehensive look at the workflow and procedures that exist in libraries for managing metadata is necessary.

Details

OCLC Systems & Services: International digital library perspectives, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-075X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

Elaine L. Westbrooks

Abstract

Details

Electronic Resources Review, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1364-5137

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2001

Elaine L. Westbrooks

Abstract

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 May 2000

Elaine L. Westbrooks

Abstract

Details

Electronic Resources Review, vol. 4 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1364-5137

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

R. John Robertson

Abstract

Details

Library Review, vol. 55 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 1 March 2021

Noreen Siddiqui

Online retailing is continuing to grow at a time with many fashion brands are closing retail stores. Social media is now an essential component within the purchase journey…

Abstract

Online retailing is continuing to grow at a time with many fashion brands are closing retail stores. Social media is now an essential component within the purchase journey of a fashion consumer. As social media networks continue to develop transactional capabilities, this has giving rise to the expansion of social shopping. Fashion brands need to consider how best to optimise social shopping opportunities as an extension of the retail shopping experience. Reviewing developments within retailing, a conceptual model of social shopping is proposed, which places mobile technologies as central to the social shopping experience both on social media and in store.

Details

New Perspectives on Critical Marketing and Consumer Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-554-2

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 July 2018

Naomi Burns, Zina Alkaisy and Elaine Sharp

The purpose of this paper is to explore the attitudes and beliefs of doctors towards medication error reporting following 15 years of a national patient safety agenda.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the attitudes and beliefs of doctors towards medication error reporting following 15 years of a national patient safety agenda.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a qualitative descriptive study utilising semi-structured interviews. A group of ten doctors of different disciplines shared their attitudes and beliefs about medication error reporting. Using thematic content analysis, findings were reflected upon those collected by the same author of a similar study 13 years before (2002).

Findings

Five key themes were identified: lack of incident feedback, non-user-friendly incident reporting systems, supportive cultures, electronic prescribing and time pressures. Despite more positive responses to the benefits of medication error reporting in 2015 compared to 2002, doctors at both times expressed a reluctance to use the hospital’s incident reporting system, labelling it time consuming and non-user-friendly. A more supportive environment, however, where error had been made was thought to exist compared to 2002. The role of the pharmacist was highlighted as critical in reducing medication error with the introduction of electronic prescribing being pivotal in 2015.

Originality/value

To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to compare doctors’ attitudes on medication errors following a period of time of increased patient safety awareness. The results suggest that error reporting today is largely more positive and organisations are more supportive than in 2002. Despite a change from paper to electronic methods, there is a continuing need to improve the efficacy of incident reporting systems and ensure an open, supportive environment for clinicians.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Managing and Resolving Workplace Conflict
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-060-2

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 7 November 2016

Keren Dali

Personal readers’ histories have long had a respected place in reading research. They add a human, personalized dimension to the studies of reading practices, often…

Abstract

Purpose

Personal readers’ histories have long had a respected place in reading research. They add a human, personalized dimension to the studies of reading practices, often reported through aggregate findings and generalized conclusions. Moreover, they introduce a private context of readers’ lives, which complements other reading contexts (e.g. historical, socio-economic and cultural) required for an understanding of reading behaviours. The purpose of this paper, based on a selected data set from a larger reading study, is to introduce a gallery of portraits of immigrant readers with the aim to facilitate the library practice with immigrant communities.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative face-to-face intensive interviews with immigrant readers.

Findings

The knowledge of reading contexts and the opportunity to see readers as individuals rather than anonymous statistics are crucial for librarians who come in contact with multicultural populations. Personal histories can also serve as a step in building interpersonal relationships between librarians and community members.

Originality/value

The value of the study is in introducing a methodological approach which, through collecting and writing reading histories, allows librarians to gain insight into the cultural practices of multicultural communities and to adjust their work accordingly. This approach can also be used as a prototype for researching other community groups.

Details

Library Review, vol. 65 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1990

Lynn Westbrook

Qualitative evaluation concerns the examination and analysis of individual experiences. This type of research tends to answer questions of why, how, what is the process…

Abstract

Qualitative evaluation concerns the examination and analysis of individual experiences. This type of research tends to answer questions of why, how, what is the process, what is the relationship, and so on in an effort to understand the essential nature of a service or process. While statistics tell us how many questions we have answered, qualitative evaluation tells us how well we have met the patrons' needs.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

1 – 10 of 16