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1 – 10 of 236
Article
Publication date: 1 October 1999

Edgar H. Schein

Although organizational learning is often defined as the result of many individuals learning generatively in an organizational context, the argument is made that such…

8736

Abstract

Although organizational learning is often defined as the result of many individuals learning generatively in an organizational context, the argument is made that such learning is de facto coercive persuasion. Generative learning by the individual requires free choice of exit if and when cognitive redefinition becomes painful. When organizations demand such redefinition as part of culture change programs they are de facto creating a situation of coercive persuasion. We must then examine our moral position with respect to both the methods of learning and the ultimate goals of the change effort.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1988

Edgar H. Schein

Developing effective managers requires a reappraisal of the development process — for the educators, as well as the students. It is necessary to make the curricula as…

Abstract

Developing effective managers requires a reappraisal of the development process — for the educators, as well as the students. It is necessary to make the curricula as exciting and attractive, as well as basically useful, as possible. The method of teaching, as well as the content, must also be stimulating. The use of workshops and seminars is advocated.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Book part
Publication date: 23 July 2014

Edgar H. Schein

This chapter explores the role that coercion plays in the educational process, looking at it both from the point of view of the teacher and from the perspective of the…

Abstract

This chapter explores the role that coercion plays in the educational process, looking at it both from the point of view of the teacher and from the perspective of the student/learner. The primary focus will be on coercion but inevitably manipulation and seduction enter the picture as well. I have observed that when learners get really motivated, or, as I prefer to call it, animated, they seem to learn more and certainly enjoy it more. What has come to be called experiential education has become very popular as a way of animating learners, which raises the question of whether this form of learning rests on fundamentally different assumptions than traditional teaching formats. This analysis and implications applies primarily to the learning of interpersonal, group, and interorganizational relationships and the “human side of enterprise,” that is, management and leadership. The need to explore the design of alternative experiential learning settings that animate learners and/or invent new modes of learning without the intense face-to-face contact – that animation seems to be depended on – is advocated.

Details

Research in Organizational Change and Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-312-4

Abstract

Details

Onboarding: Getting New Hires off to a Flying Start
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-582-5

Content available
Article
Publication date: 13 November 2018

V.K. Narayanan and Andrea C. Farro

507

Abstract

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 46 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Article
Publication date: 22 November 2011

Cristiano Busco and Robert W. Scapens

The purpose of this paper is to explore the nature, roles and dynamics of change of management accounting systems (MAS), in processes of continuous organisational learning…

5608

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the nature, roles and dynamics of change of management accounting systems (MAS), in processes of continuous organisational learning and transformation. By studying the interaction between the accounting (and finance) function and the implementation of a Six‐sigma initiative, as the engine for organisational change, the authors seek to uncover the potential of measurement‐based systems of management for aligning business processes with corporate strategies. Such systems sustain continuous processes of transformation by infusing organisational culture with financial and non‐financial metrics of accountability.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is based on a longitudinal case study in which one of the authors had the opportunity to exercise what Schein called the clinical perspective; i.e. combining the role of researcher with that of helper‐consultant. There is mutual interdependence in the relationship between the authors' theoretical framework and the authors' longitudinal case study. While, on the one hand, the case research contributed to the search for an institutional explanation of the evidence experienced and collected, on the other hand, the empirical data are illuminated by the theoretical insights gained from that framework.

Findings

After first discussing cultural change, the authors rely both on the “clinical” position of one of the authors as researcher/helper‐consultant and on the insights provided by Schein's work on organisational culture and Giddens' structuration theory to develop an institutional framework for interpreting the ways in which routinised systems of accountability bind the ongoing processes of cultural transformation across time and space.

Research limitations/implications

Possible limitations are: the conceptualisation of organisational culture as a shared and institutional phenomenon does not take account of wider anthropological aspects (such as the influence of national culture); the role of helper‐consultant as well as researcher may have influenced some of the authors' interpretations; the authors' analysis does not consider macro‐economic variables; and only a small percentage of shop‐floor workers were interviewed.

Originality/value

The paper sheds light on the role of management accounting within organisational processes of transformation far beyond their mere visible enactment. As a result, the authors develop an institutional framework to interpret the linkages between the cognitive dynamics which characterise organisational culture (viewed as shared cognitive schemas) and the behavioural and structural modalities through which they are drawn upon and reproduced by organisational members.

Details

Qualitative Research in Accounting & Management, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1176-6093

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1997

Edgar H. Schein

Defines the different categories of client that a consultant must deal with and the levels of intervention that must be considered in relation to client types. Examines…

13271

Abstract

Defines the different categories of client that a consultant must deal with and the levels of intervention that must be considered in relation to client types. Examines the principles of process consultation that must be observed in any client relationship. These principles show how process consultation as a form of helping differs from other kinds of consultation. Argues that every consultant needs to be able to play the process consultation role.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2012

Jeffrey D. Yergler

3443

Abstract

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 19 April 2013

Fred Luthans, Ivana Milosevic, Beth A. Bechky, Edgar H. Schein, Susan Wright, John Van Maanen and Davydd J. Greenwood

This collection of commentaries on the reprinted 1987 article by Nancy C. Morey and Fred Luthans, “Anthropology: the forgotten behavioral science in management history”…

Abstract

Purpose

This collection of commentaries on the reprinted 1987 article by Nancy C. Morey and Fred Luthans, “Anthropology: the forgotten behavioral science in management history”, aims to reflect on the treatment of the history of anthropological work in organizational studies presented in the original article.

Design/methodology/approach

The essays are invited and peer‐reviewed contributions from scholars in organizational studies and anthropology.

Findings

The scholars invited to comment on the original article have seen its value, and their contributions ground its content in contemporary issues and debates.

Originality/value

The original article was deemed “original” for its time (1987), anticipating as it did considerable reclamation of ethnographic methods in organizational studies in the decades that followed it. It was also deemed of value for our times and, in particular, for readers of this journal, as an historical document, but also as one view of the unsung role of anthropology in management and organizational studies.

Details

Journal of Organizational Ethnography, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6749

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

Alberto Petroni

Explores the evolution of career management systems for industrial researchers. Based on case studies of experimental career development systems for industrial…

2568

Abstract

Explores the evolution of career management systems for industrial researchers. Based on case studies of experimental career development systems for industrial researchers, combined with a survey of 151 researchers and engineers employed at a large public research institution, alternative approaches toward managing professional careers are discussed. The results indicate that the researchers’ personal career orientations, as measured by Schein’s Career Anchors Inventory, may serve as a useful predictor of their career preferences. In addition, the research enables an evaluation of alternative modes of career development for industrial R&D to be developed.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 6 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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1 – 10 of 236