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Article

Francis Ssennoga

Developing countries face a problem of making a decision of opening up public procurement markets to all suppliers irrespective of their country of origin. The perceived…

Abstract

Developing countries face a problem of making a decision of opening up public procurement markets to all suppliers irrespective of their country of origin. The perceived benefit of opening up procurement markets (non-discriminatory practices) is that it enhances competitiveness, leading to efficient public resources utilisation. Governments discriminating against foreign firms in favour of local suppliers are motivated by the desire to achieve benefits such as, stimulating infant industries, fostering underdeveloped regions and creating employment. This paper examines both arguments and makes recommendations as to how developing countries could open up procurement markets without losing their social and economic objectives.

Details

Journal of Public Procurement, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1535-0118

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Article

Shelena Keulemans and Steven Van de Walle

The purpose of this paper is to explore and explain public preferences for different public procurement practices. The paper looks into public support for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore and explain public preferences for different public procurement practices. The paper looks into public support for cost-effectiveness, discriminatory procurement in favour of domestic suppliers and sustainable procurement.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses Eurobarometer public opinion data on 26.836 EU citizens from 27 EU countries.

Findings

This paper shows that EU citizens want public authorities to evaluate multiple aspects of any procurement offer in their public procurement decisions. It also found that, although cost-effectiveness and domestic favouritism are still important to EU citizens, citizens are most supportive of the objectives of sustainable procurement. Some associations between citizens’ procurement preferences and their social characteristics and political attitudes were found, but these only explain citizen procurement preferences to a limited extent. Country of residence has the strongest association with citizens’ acceptance of the objectives of sustainable procurement.

Research limitations/implications

Even though the data contain information on the procurement preferences of a large number of EU citizens, it is a topic of inquiry that is sensitive to social desirability bias.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the empirical understanding of public attitudes towards public procurement. It is one of few studies on citizen attitudes towards different public procurement practices.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Keywords

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Article

Thuso Mphela and John P.W. Shunda

The paper aims to investigate challenges facing small-, medium- and micro-sized enterprises (SMMEs) in public procurement in Botswana from the view of a buyer.

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to investigate challenges facing small-, medium- and micro-sized enterprises (SMMEs) in public procurement in Botswana from the view of a buyer.

Design/methodology/approach

The researchers conducted consultative workshops, succeeded by focus groups and follow-up telephone interviews, to collect and validate data. A total of 75 procurement officers from central government ministries and local governments participated in the study.

Findings

Results indicate that SMMEs find it difficult to deal with public procurement because of lack of capacity, unfair bias against SMMEs, inefficient government payment systems, unfair competition from their larger and established counterparts and centralized public procurement. The paper recommends a comprehensive integrated framework, improvement of SMME capacity and adopting policies to ensure greater public procurement market access.

Details

Journal of Public Procurement, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1535-0118

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Article

Irma Tikkanen and Leila Jaakkola

The purpose of this paper is to present the sustainable value chain activities that have been implemented when providing sustainable food services and sustainable value. A…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the sustainable value chain activities that have been implemented when providing sustainable food services and sustainable value. A municipal catering organisation in Finland is introduced as an example.

Design/methodology/approach

The theoretical framework comprises sustainability as a strategy and the value chain and its sustainability. Existing research on the sustainability of food services and sustainable value in the professional kitchens is described. The primary data were collected from the two representatives of the case organisation using a written questionnaire with open-ended questions. Furthermore, secondary data from the web pages of the case organisation were utilised. The sustainable actions were categorised using a pattern-matching logic.

Findings

The findings illustrate the implemented pragmatic sustainable actions in all primary and support activities, which are local, national and international. These actions were based on the owner municipality’s strategy of sustainable development. Economic, social and ecological sustainable values were achieved.

Practical implications

The case description may act as a reference model for a catering organisation when targeting sustainable food services and sustainable value. The case might also be utilised as a teaching case in hospitality management schools. The paper contributes to the pragmatic view of sustainability by describing the everyday working orientation of the case organisation.

Originality/value

The case provides practical information on how to achieve sustainable economic, social and ecological values in municipal food services.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Insights, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9792

Keywords

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Article

Sawsan Abutabenjeh, Stephen B. Gordon and Berhanu Mengistu

By implementing various forms of preference policies, countries around the world intervene in their economies for their own political and economic purposes. Likewise…

Abstract

By implementing various forms of preference policies, countries around the world intervene in their economies for their own political and economic purposes. Likewise, twenty-five states in the U.S. have implemented in-state preference policies (NASPO, 2012) to protect and support their own vendors from out-of-state competition to achieve similar purposes. The purpose of this paper is to show the connection between protectionist public policy instruments noted in the international trade literature and the in-state preference policies within the United States. This paper argues that the reasons and the rationales for adopting these preference policies in international trade and the states' contexts are similar. Given the similarity in policy outcomes, the paper further argues that the international trade literature provides an overarching explanation to help understand what states could expect in applying in-state preference policies.

Details

Journal of Public Procurement, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1535-0118

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Article

Rainer Kattel and Veiko Lember

This article sets out to answer two interrelated questions: is it advisable for developing countries to use public procurement efforts for development, and should more…

Abstract

This article sets out to answer two interrelated questions: is it advisable for developing countries to use public procurement efforts for development, and should more developing countries join the World Trade Organization (WTO) Government Procurement Agreement (GPA)? We survey key arguments for and against joining the GPA, and argue that government procurement should not be seen only as an indirect support measure for development, but also as a direct vehicle for promoting innovation and industries and, thus, growth and development. We also show that using public procurement for development assumes high levels of policy capacity, which most developing countries lack. In addition, we show how the GPA as well as other WTO agreements make it complicated for the developing countries to benefit from public procurement for innovation. The article suggests that the developing countries could apply a mix of direct and indirect (so-called soft) public-procurement-for-innovation measures. In order to do this, developing countries need to develop the policy capacity to take advantage of the complex and multi-layered industrial policy space still available under WTO rules.

Details

Journal of Public Procurement, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1535-0118

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Article

Demelash Demessie

Public procurement is characterized as a distorted market which grants limited access to foreign suppliers and contractors. However, the different impediments existing…

Abstract

Public procurement is characterized as a distorted market which grants limited access to foreign suppliers and contractors. However, the different impediments existing within the public procurement policies and their relative significance in restricting effective international competition are not very well known. This paper, through the process of developing a model of Trade Restrictiveness Index, identifies weighs and scales 17 impediments existing within the public procurement policies. The paper also reveals that implicit restriction which emanates mainly from lack of transparency imposes a greater level of restriction in the market. In a final application of the model, comparison of the public procurement policies of selected Common Market for Eastern and Southern African (COMESA) countries, has shown that with a rated index of 1, the procurement policies of Kenya and Uganda are rated as most restrictive while Rwandaʼs is found to be least restrictive.

Details

Journal of Public Procurement, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1535-0118

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Article

M.R.H. Uttley and K. Hartley

The removal of discriminatory public procurement has presented a majorpolicy issue for the European Community in the move towards the 1992Single European Market. Considers…

Abstract

The removal of discriminatory public procurement has presented a major policy issue for the European Community in the move towards the 1992 Single European Market. Considers three questions: why have governments traditionally adopted “buy national” purchasing policies and what are the potential benefits associated with a single market for EC public procurement?; which policies have the EC adopted to liberalize public contracting?; and how effective is the Community′s new public procurement regime?

Details

European Business Review, vol. 94 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

Keywords

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Article

Benjamin Liebman

Government procurement policies containing domestic content requirements have faced increasing attention, as more traditional forms of trade discrimination have declined…

Abstract

Purpose

Government procurement policies containing domestic content requirements have faced increasing attention, as more traditional forms of trade discrimination have declined in recent decades. The most important effort to reduce discriminatory government procurement policies is the plurilateral Agreement on Government Procurement (GPA), in which a subset of WTO countries has agreed to provide increased access to imports from fellow signatory countries. This paper focuses on the Buy American policy, which mandates domestic content for all US Federal government purchase above the micro-purchase level. The author tests whether steel imports from GPA and US Free Trade Agreement (FTA) partners, both of which receive preferential access to US federal procurements, increase as the value of federal construction contracts rise.

Design/methodology/approach

The author tracks federal construction contracts and seeks to determine whether there is a link between these contracts and construction grade steel imports from GPA and US FTA members. The author uses two-stage least squares to regress the import quantity of steel from GPA and US FTA countries on the value of US federal construction contracts. Imported and domestic steel prices as well as macroeconomic variables such as industrial production and non-residential construction are controlled for. A panel data set is used that includes three different construction-grade steel products and covers years 2004-2013.

Findings

The results indicate that increased federal construction contracts increase imports of construction-grade steel from GPA and FTA partners. This effect is relatively small, however, which may be due to the fact that federal construction is a small share of overall US construction. In general, the results suggest that the primary determinant of US import sourcing behavior is the business cycle as well as the price of steel. Nevertheless, the findings indicate that the preferences provided by the GPA and FTAs do have some impact on where US construction firms source their steel.

Originality/value

Previous research has studied the effect of the WTO’s GPA on foreign access to federal construction and other service contracts. This is the first study, however, to investigate whether these contracts impact the import sourcing behavior of the steel that is used in construction. Furthermore, while previous research measures the impact of GPA membership on the overall trade of goods and services, this paper is the first to link a particular industry with the inputs that are restricted by local content requirements such as the Buy American policy but freed up under the GPA. In general, previous research on the GPA has tried to capture the broad effect of GPA membership on trade, while this study focuses on the relationship between the GPA, federal procurement in a particular industry (construction) and import behavior of a key input, construction grade steel.

Details

Journal of International Trade Law and Policy, vol. 15 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-0024

Keywords

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Article

Stephen Martin, Keith Hartley and Andrew Cox

Explains that the public sector is a major buyer of goods and services. In the mid‐1980s discriminatory (buy national) public purchasing was identified as one of the…

Abstract

Explains that the public sector is a major buyer of goods and services. In the mid‐1980s discriminatory (buy national) public purchasing was identified as one of the barriers to the completion of the Single European Market. Studies suggested that a more liberal public purchasing regime would bring significant economic benefits with increased competition for contracts reducing public sector procurement costs and facilitating the creation of a more competitive European industrial base. These ideas led to a series of European Union procurement directives designed to prohibit preferential public purchasing. Uses data on contract awards from 1993 to investigate the extent to which public purchasing still discriminates in favour of domestic firms. This evidence casts doubts on the true extent of openness in EU public procurement markets.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Keywords

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