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Article

K. Sivakumar and Subroto Roy

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to propose that the nature and degree of control during new product development (NPD) outsourcing depends upon its initiation…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to propose that the nature and degree of control during new product development (NPD) outsourcing depends upon its initiation stage or implementation stage; second, to delineate the moderating effect of globalization and digitizability that further influence the link between NPD stage and control systems.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors propose a conceptual framework and develop a series or propositions.

Findings

The nature and degree of control systems required in NPD is contingent upon the stage of the NPD process and this relationship is moderated by the degree of globalization and digitizability.

Research limitations/implications

The paper offers a conceptual platform that can be explored in future empirical research. The paper offers a series of propositions as well as measurement items to enable this task.

Practical implications

The research underscores the idea that instituting appropriate control systems in outsourcing NPD is a complex process that requires careful consideration of the nature of the activity, the nature of the control and firm strategy.

Originality/value

This paper is the first to conceptually examine the domain of the three-way intersection of NPD stage-gate process, outsourcing relationships and control systems. By doing so, the authors extend each of the three individual research domains in new directions as well as enhance the understanding of the interrelationships among these three domains.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

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Article

Subroto Roy and K. Sivakumar

Advances in information technology (IT) and the globalization of business are both realities and opportunities of the twenty‐first century. This article aims to examine…

Abstract

Purpose

Advances in information technology (IT) and the globalization of business are both realities and opportunities of the twenty‐first century. This article aims to examine the role of information technology in the globalization of business buying behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

Literature and theory are used to develop a conceptual model of adoption of information technology (IT) and globalization of business buying behavior. Firm‐level and global moderating factors are also examined.

Findings

IT adoption includes IT adoption by buyer and by seller and the compatibility of both IT systems. Globalizations of buying behavior is moderated by firm‐level factors like perceived risk, digitizability and by task and global moderating factors like availability of alternative suppliers in buyer country, cultural distance and the political stability in the supplier country.

Research limitations/implications

The paper provides a number of propositions that can be tested empirically, and also extensions for training and skills for business buyers.

Practical implications

The correct choice of IT systems for compatibility with buyers and sellers can mitigate the negative effects of moderating factors.

Originality/value

The paper sets out the impact of IT adoption by buyer and seller firms and its impact on globalization of business buying behavior in the twenty‐first century.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article

Ting‐Peng Liang, Cheng‐Yi Lin and Deng‐Neng Chen

The rapid proliferation of the Internet has allowed many firms to use this new technology to run Web‐based electronic stores to expand their markets and to enhance the…

Abstract

The rapid proliferation of the Internet has allowed many firms to use this new technology to run Web‐based electronic stores to expand their markets and to enhance the operational performance. Therefore, it is interesting to investigate why electronic commerce benefits some industries more than others, and what factors affect the impact of using e‐Stores on performance in different industries. This paper reports findings on the effect of industrial characteristics, as portrayed by product information content and information intensity of the value chain, and e‐commerce models on firm performance. The results indicate that both industrial characteristics and e‐commerce models have significant effects on firm performance. Among the industrial characteristics, information content of the product and information intensity of the value chain have been found to have a significant impact on firm performances.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 104 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

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Article

Thierry Karsenti and Simon Collin

One of the major challenges in teacher training programs is the gap between the theory that is presented to pre‐service teachers and actual classroom practice. Many…

Abstract

Purpose

One of the major challenges in teacher training programs is the gap between the theory that is presented to pre‐service teachers and actual classroom practice. Many researchers, educators, and pre‐service teachers have emphasized the difficulty of linking theory and practice in teacher education programs. The purpose of this study is to better understand the impact of online teaching videos on the development of self‐efficacy beliefs in pre‐service teachers.

Design/methodology/approach

Over 400 student teachers participated in this study. Statistical analyses of questionnaires were conducted to assess the impact of online teaching videos. The results reveal that online videos did affect the self‐efficacy beliefs of pre‐service teachers.

Findings

Online videos of teaching practices appear to contribute positively to feelings of self‐efficacy in pre‐service teachers.

Practical implications

Given the importance of self‐efficacy for teachers' professional development, online videos could prove highly useful to this end. Apart from the impact of the videos themselves, self‐directed learning has the benefit of flexibility in terms of time and space, which is typical of open and distance learning in general. Furthermore, online videos can be readily adapted to individual professional development plans, according to the teacher's needs, in contrast to more formal training programs (either initial or continuing) with their relatively rigid, predetermined contents.

Originality/value

This study presents an original self‐training online video device that could easily be integrated in teacher training to support effectively their professional development.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

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Case study

Mohanbir Sawhney and Sachin Waikar

Microsoft's Office team was developing the marketing communication plan for its new product, Office 2007. Office was a very mature product and several versions of the…

Abstract

Microsoft's Office team was developing the marketing communication plan for its new product, Office 2007. Office was a very mature product and several versions of the product had been introduced over more than 20 years. As such, the new version had to overcome the consumer perception that the versions of Microsoft Office that they already have are “good enough” for them. The Office 2007 marketing team has come up with a two-step campaign strategy that sought to first create awareness and intrigue using traditional media, followed by the heavy use of digital media to get consumer to experience the product through different types of “digital experiences.” The team needs to decide how much of its advertising spending it should shift from traditional media to digital media, how to design the most effective digital experiences and how to measure the effectiveness of digital experiences. The case is set at a time when digital media were emerging as a promising way to engage consumers more deeply with brands and products, but marketers were uncertain about the relative effectiveness of different digital marketing tactics and the optimal mix of traditional versus digital marketing channels for different product, market and campaign contexts.

To introduce students to the possibilities of “engagement marketing” using emerging digital marketing channels To emphasize the complementary nature of traditional versus digital media and their relative effectiveness at different stages of the consumer journey from awareness to perception change to behavior. To highlight the opportunities and opportunities in designing and measuring the effectiveness of integrated marketing campaigns when digital channels are added to the marketing communications mix.

Details

Kellogg School of Management Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-6568
Published by: Kellogg School of Management

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