Search results

1 – 10 of over 93000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 22 January 2019

Rohit Titiyal, Sujoy Bhattacharya and Jitesh J. Thakkar

The purpose of this paper is to apply a multi-criteria decision-making (MCDM) framework to evaluate distribution strategies for an e-tailer. An application of MCDM method…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to apply a multi-criteria decision-making (MCDM) framework to evaluate distribution strategies for an e-tailer. An application of MCDM method, the hybrid DANP–VIseKriterijumska Optimizacija I Kompromisno Resenje (VIKOR) model, is used for e-tailers’ distribution strategy evaluation. The choice of distribution strategies under various dimensions is evaluated.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used a hybrid MCDM model to solve the decision-making framework, which combines Decision-Making Trial and Evaluation Laboratory (DEMATEL), DEMATEL-based analytic network process and VIKOR method. Data were collected from the experts (e-tail manager, logistics manager, operations manager and distribution center (DC) manager) using two questionnaires, first for the influential relationship among the criteria and dimensions and second for a performance rating of each alternative (distribution strategies) against each criterion.

Findings

DANP with VIKOR method prioritizes the distribution strategies in the following order: DC shipment, drop shipment, click and collect, store shipment and click and reserve. Performance gap was calculated based on the VIKOR method to provide distribution strategies to an e-tailer under different situations. The authors infer that in developing country, product characteristics and transportation have a major influence on deciding the distribution strategy.

Practical implications

Decision-making framework will provide e-tail mangers a knowledge-based understanding to select the distribution strategy under the different situations related to the performance, product, e-tailer and external characteristics for smooth order fulfillment process. The insights developed by this research provide a framework for rational decision making in distribution strategy selection in e-business.

Originality/value

This is the first kind of a study which offers a decision framework for e-tail managers on how to choose distribution strategies under different situations which are related to the performance, product, e-tailer and external characteristics.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 14 September 2012

Kangkang Yu, Jack Cadeaux and Hua Song

In response to highly volatile and uncertain environments, many firms have implemented flexible strategies and many management researchers have discussed the topic of…

Abstract

Purpose

In response to highly volatile and uncertain environments, many firms have implemented flexible strategies and many management researchers have discussed the topic of flexibility. The purpose of this paper is to focus on distribution flexibility, the aspect of flexibility related to a downstream supply chain and to examine the construct of distribution flexibility and how organisations make strategic choices among different distribution flexibility strategies.

Design/methodology/approach

This work conducts an exploratory multiple case study which analyses four Chinese manufacturers from different industries (pharmaceutical, solid/liquid separation, electric appliances, and clothing).

Findings

The results show that, given different circumstances, firms might choose an appropriate distribution flexibility strategy (one focused on either physical distribution flexibility, demand management flexibility, coordination flexibility, or on distribution flexibility co‐alignment) which fits with their distribution environment in the contingency theory sense of matching. Furthermore, for implementation, they fit a given distribution flexibility strategy to both their distribution networks and their distribution performance outcomes in the sense of gestalts or covariance.

Research limitations/implications

This paper has some limitations common to all case studies, such as the limited generalisability of results (since the sample of firms is not statistically significant) and the potential subjectivity of the analysis.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the existing literature by empirically investigating the dimensions of distribution flexibility, by considering how an organisation develops a distribution flexibility strategy in order to adapt to a particular environment, and by suggesting that final performance outcomes may arise through a variety of different distribution flexibility strategies.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 32 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 31 December 2003

Mihnea C Moldoveanu, Joel A.C Baum and Tim J Rowley

We introduce a multi-level model of the dependence of interfirm network topologies on the distribution and commonality of information in a network and the information…

Abstract

We introduce a multi-level model of the dependence of interfirm network topologies on the distribution and commonality of information in a network and the information strategies pursued by its member firms. Network topology, information properties of the network, and firm-level action within the network form dynamic, recursive, cross-level relationships – information properties in the network determine firm-level action, which in turn impacts the network topology and information properties. We derive predictions about the kinds of information strategies that firms are likely to adopt and succeed with in different information regimes, and about the kinds and short- and long-run dynamics of network topologies expected under different information regimes. Our model sheds new light on network topologies as a dependent variable that can be explained by network-level information regimes and firm-level information strategies.

Details

Multi-Level Issues in Organizational Behavior and Strategy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-039-5

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1985

Robert Lorin Cook and James R. Burley

Recently, a few major US firms such as General Motors and Dow Corning have begun to plan international physical distribution strategy on an integrated basis. However, many…

Abstract

Recently, a few major US firms such as General Motors and Dow Corning have begun to plan international physical distribution strategy on an integrated basis. However, many firms still plan international physical distribution strategy on a more fractionalised basis using several independent functional department and/or country plans. This is reflective of the polycentric orientation that has predominated in international marketing strategy. These non‐integrative approaches to strategy planning can result in ineffective and inefficient international physical distribution for several reasons.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Materials Management, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0269-8218

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 22 November 2011

Jukka Lassila, Tero Kaipia, Juha Haakana and Jarmo Partanen

The purpose of this paper is to establish a methodological framework to address key issues in electricity distribution network development. The paper defines subtasks in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to establish a methodological framework to address key issues in electricity distribution network development. The paper defines subtasks in the strategy process and presents key elements in the strategy work and long‐term network planning. The results are illustrated by a case network.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper describes the methodology for cost and reliability analyses in the strategy work. The focus is on techno‐economic feasibility of certain network development technologies in the network strategy and the surveys are linked to economic regulation, specifically to reliability of supply and allowed return. The study addresses the stages of strategic decision making and compilation of investment strategies.

Findings

The strategic planning concept and methods are applicable in practice; the results have proven valuable in the long‐term business development and in discussions with the company owners. Outage costs are an essential element in the economic regulation of the business, reliability being a key driver in network planning.

Research limitations/implications

There is no universal solution to strategic decision making, but each development task is highly case specific. This is due to diverging operating environments and targets set by the company owners; these issues strongly influence the strategy process.

Practical implications

The work illustrates strategic planning in an actual distribution company and shows how the methodology can be applied to the strategic network development. Nevertheless, the results cannot be generalised as such, but each network has to be considered individually.

Originality/value

The proposed concept can be applied to the long‐term development of distribution networks. The results are internationally applicable, yet diverging regulatory models call for specific methodology in each country.

Details

International Journal of Energy Sector Management, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6220

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 July 1989

John Fernie

Distribution has been a major element of retailers′ marketingstrategy in recent years as companies strive to control costs but at thesame time seek competitive advantage…

Abstract

Distribution has been a major element of retailers′ marketing strategy in recent years as companies strive to control costs but at the same time seek competitive advantage through improving service to stores and gaining greater control of stock in the supply chain. In an interview survey of distribution directors from major multiple groups, all companies were reviewing their distribution strategy and many had made major changes to their distribution system. Centralisation of stock in strategically located RDCs and the use of third party contractors were main features of retail companies′ strategy. Contractors were much more aggressive in marketing their services to retailers than hitherto. This is partly related to the competitive and turbulent nature of the industry. In a survey of marketing directors/managers of distribution companies, it was clear that firms were trying to raise their profile in the market as they “went public” and/or because they were moving into new industry sectors away from their “core” specialist areas.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Materials Management, vol. 19 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0269-8218

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 27 July 2010

Xuan Zhao, Run H. Niu and Ignacio Castillo

The purpose of this paper is to better understand the selection of a distribution channel strategy for a non‐profit organization selling products or services to its end customers.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to better understand the selection of a distribution channel strategy for a non‐profit organization selling products or services to its end customers.

Design/methodology/approach

Two channel strategies are generally considered: an integrated channel where the non‐profit organization sells its products or services using its own selling departments or branches; and a decentralized channel where the non‐profit organization sells through a for‐profit retailer. The fundamental question is: how should a non‐profit organization select its distribution channel strategy under certain market conditions?

Findings

It was found that selecting a decentralized channel strategy results in an optimal retail price that is higher than that under an integrated channel strategy, which results in lower customer welfare under the decentralized channel. It was also found that a decentralized channel behaves as an integrated fully for‐profit channel. Thus, whether a non‐profit organization should choose an integrated or a decentralized channel when facing competition from an integrated or a decentralized fully for‐profit channel depends on its cost structure and the level of substitutability of the products or services offered by the two channels.

Practical implications

When competing with an integrated fully for‐profit channel, the non‐profit organization is better off using an integrated channel under strong competition or a decentralized channel under weak competition. When competing with a decentralized fully for‐profit channel, the selection is more complicated. It was found that a decentralized channel is the best choice if the price competition factor, where threshold value depends on the cost structure, is large.

Originality/value

Non‐profit organizations have a clear (perhaps increasing) need for distribution centers or retailers in order to reach people who need their products or services. Moreover, it has been reported that the interactions between for‐profit and non‐profit sectors continue to grow, thus increasing the forms of community involvement available to reach people. It is thus clear that additional research is needed to better understand the selection of a distribution channel strategy for a non‐profit organization selling products or services to its end customers, and also the related managerial implications.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 44 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Lala Hu

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the distribution strategies implemented by foreign firms in emerging markets, and to investigate whether they represent an…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the distribution strategies implemented by foreign firms in emerging markets, and to investigate whether they represent an opportunity for firms to innovate their practice. China is selected as the setting of the investigation as distribution is a critical determinant of business success for international firms operating there.

Design/methodology/approach

A multiple-case study approach is adopted by investigating the distribution strategies of four Italian firms in China. The collected data consist of interviews with firm managers and their distributors. To ensure triangulation and cross-verify the findings from the primary data, secondary data consisting of sector reports and newspaper articles were analyzed.

Findings

Results discuss how foreign firms develop their distribution system in China and suggest that emerging markets can enable reverse innovation in their distribution strategies.

Research limitations/implications

The research suffers from the limitations of the generalizability of the findings as the study was carried out on a restricted number of firms, and it considered their strategies in one single market.

Practical implications

Managerial implications are discussed on the extent to which the Chinese distribution system still represents a key issue for foreign firms, but it also provides with opportunity for innovation.

Originality/value

While previous research on innovation in emerging markets has mainly focused on product innovation, this study suggests some areas for distribution innovation.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 30 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1987

David J. Closs and Robert L. Cook

One strategy that can offer substantial transportation performance improvement is freight consolidation. Freight consolidation refers to the practice of aggregating…

Abstract

One strategy that can offer substantial transportation performance improvement is freight consolidation. Freight consolidation refers to the practice of aggregating customer orders over space and/or time until a specified minimum total shipment weight/volume is accumulated and/or a maximum holding time for the oldest customer order is reached. The aggregated customer orders are then shipped together.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Materials Management, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0269-8218

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1985

David L. Anderson

Major changes are already under way in the international distribution operations of many companies, with even more broad‐based ones likely in the future. The recent…

Abstract

Major changes are already under way in the international distribution operations of many companies, with even more broad‐based ones likely in the future. The recent deregulation of the US ocean liner companies will create new opportunities for international shippers to redesign existing distribution channels in order to reduce order cycle days and shipment costs. Further, as the United States continues to shift towards a technology and service‐based economy—implying that it will produce fewer goods domestically and buy more from abroad—it is clear that for many firms international logistics will become a more important part of the physical distribution function before the end of the 1980s.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Materials Management, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0269-8218

1 – 10 of over 93000