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Article
Publication date: 15 July 2021

Fernando Menchini, Paschoal Tadeu Russo, Tiago Nascimento Borges Slavov and Rodrigo Paiva Souza

The purpose of this paper is to understand the association between the capacity to use enterprise architecture tools and the effectiveness of business model digitalization…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the association between the capacity to use enterprise architecture tools and the effectiveness of business model digitalization in companies.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used two research strategies – survey and focus group – to analyze the relationship between maturity in using enterprise architecture (EA) and digital maturity, under the perspective of sociomateriality.

Findings

The use of EA is not a strategic competence that contributes to building sustainable competitive advantage, in the process of business model digitalization. On the other hand, top management’s determination and clarity, expressed by its sponsorship to communicating the strategy, contribute to the integration, engagement and adaptability of those involved and are responsible for higher maturity in the digitalization of business models.

Research limitations/implications

The statistical treatment used does not allow understanding the causality between the variables.

Practical implications

It provides executives with important elements for clarifying and operationalizing digital business models.

Originality/value

The study operationalizes a theoretical and measurement model, through a strategy that used simultaneously a survey and a focus group, which allowed to know associations between technological capacities and maturity in digital business models.

Details

Revista de Gestão, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1809-2276

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Article
Publication date: 21 February 2020

William Gerard Ryan, Alex Fenton, Wasim Ahmed and Phillip Scarf

The purpose of this research is to explore and define the digital maturity of events using the Industry 4.0 model (I4.0) to create a definition for Events 4.0 (E4.0) and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to explore and define the digital maturity of events using the Industry 4.0 model (I4.0) to create a definition for Events 4.0 (E4.0) and to place various relevant technologies on a scale of digital maturity.

Design/methodology/approach

In a mixed methods approach, we carried out a qualitative social media analysis and a quantitative survey of tourism and events academics. These surveys and the thorough literature review that preceded them allowed us to map the digital technologies used in events to levels of a digital maturity model.

Findings

We found that engagement with technology at events and delegate knowledge satisfactorily coexists for and across a number of different experiential levels. However, relative to I4.0, event research and the events industry appear to be digitally immature. At the top of the digital maturity scale, E4.0 might be defined as an event that is digitally managed; frequently upgrades its digital technology; fully integrates its communication systems; and optimizes digital operations and communication for event delivery, marketing, and customer experience. We expect E4.0 to drive further engagement with digital technologies and develop further research.

Originality/value

This study has responded to calls from the academic literature to provide a greater understanding of the digital maturity of events and how events engage with digital technology. Furthermore, the research is the first to introduce the concept of E4.0 into the academic literature. This work also provides insights for events practitioners which include the better understanding of the digital maturity of events and the widespread use of digital technology in event delivery.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

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Article
Publication date: 10 November 2020

Dorsaf Zouari, Salomée Ruel and Laurence Viale

Supply chain resilience (SCR) is a key concept for managers who wish to develop the capacity to enhance their supply chain’s (SC’s) ability to cope with unexpected…

Abstract

Purpose

Supply chain resilience (SCR) is a key concept for managers who wish to develop the capacity to enhance their supply chain’s (SC’s) ability to cope with unexpected turbulence. SC digital tools are often seen as a solution that provides more visibility, anticipation and collaboration (SCR capability factors). The purpose of this paper is to investigate the link between SCR and SC digitalisation

Design/methodology/approach

A sample was considered with 300 managers in the field of SCM, and the results were analysed using factor analysis and structural equation modelling (SEM). SEM was employed to test the impact of the degree of digital maturity and SC digital tools on SCR.

Findings

SC digitalization is characterised by the degree of digital maturity and the adoption of SC digital tools. The degree of digital maturity has a strong influence on digital tool adoption. SCR is positively impacted by both the degree of digital maturity and the adoption of digital tools.

Research limitations/implications

The findings do not indicate which tools contribute the most to SCR.

Practical implications

Managers should reflect on the need to continue digitalizing their SCs if they want greater SCR in the current uncertain environment.

Originality/value

This is the first quantitative study that focuses on assessing the impact of the degree of digital maturity and the SC digital tools adopted on SCR. Validation of the hypotheses model confirms the positive impact of SC digitalisation on SCR for researchers and managers.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 51 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 4 October 2019

Klaus North, Nekane Aramburu and Oswaldo Jose Lorenzo

The purpose of this paper is to provide guidance to SMEs to sense and seize digitally enabled growth opportunities as well as start a project-based learning process to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide guidance to SMEs to sense and seize digitally enabled growth opportunities as well as start a project-based learning process to transform the organization in order to remain competitive in turbulent environments.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed framework is nurtured from a dynamic capabilities approach as well as from digital transformation studies and mitigates shortcomings of existing frameworks on IT-enabled business transformation. A pilot study has also been carried out for testing the proposed framework.

Findings

The results of the pilot study show that the framework is well understood by SME owners or managers and contributes to a comprehensive perception of digitalization challenges and potentials. The overall maturity level of the 52 companies analyzed is moderate. Firms are better at “sensing” than “seizing”, that is, at identifying digitally based growth opportunities than in profiting from them. The test of the proposed framework also contributes to its further adjustment and refinement.

Practical implications

The developed framework is useful for owners and managers of SMEs as a self-assessment of digital maturity. It sets a baseline regarding the current position and supports coordinated initiatives for digitally enabled growth.

Originality/value

Few frameworks regarding digital maturity have been developed. Most of them lack a sound theoretical foundation and are less suited to the needs of SMEs. There are few studies on digitalization in SMEs and they are not focussed on capabilities development but mostly on processes (Trung Pham 2010; Blatz et al., 2018; Mittal et al., 2018). Therefore, the originality of this paper is to propose a framework that allows SMEs to assess their digital maturity level and the capabilities associated with each level to enhance digitally enabled growth, contributing to expand the research on the relationship between dynamic capabilities and digitalization (Teece, 2017).

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

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Article
Publication date: 11 February 2021

Beatrix Lányi, Miklós Hornyák and Ferenc Kruzslicz

The purpose of this paper is to examine the importance of websites and social media platforms to find out how they contribute to the improvement of business performance. A…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the importance of websites and social media platforms to find out how they contribute to the improvement of business performance. A new automated data collection method is developed to determine the technology maturity level of websites. These website quality indicators are linked to and compared against small and medium enterprise (SME) competitiveness data set to find competency pillars having significant impacts on the online presence, and to identify most important factors for online digital transformation. In this way, periodic analysis of websites can signal early warnings if competitiveness data of an SME is worth to refresh. Continuous maturity monitoring of competitors’ websites provides useful benchmark information for an enterprise as well.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual model was developed for the examination of the online presence and its effect on the competitiveness of small- and medium-sized businesses. An innovative, automatically generated WebIX indicator was developed through technical and content analysis of websites of 958 SMEs’ included in the Global Competitiveness Project (GCP) network data set. A series of ANOVA analysis was used for both data sources to determine the relationships between Web quality and competitiveness levels to define the online presence maturity categories.

Findings

Both the existence and the quality of the websites proved to have positive impact on the SME’s competitiveness. Different online presence maturity categories contribute to different competitiveness pillars; therefore, key factors of online digital transformation were identified. According to the findings, company websites are more related to marketing functions than information technology from the point of competitiveness.

Originality/value

Competency relationships were identified between online activity and competitiveness. The foundations of automated competitiveness measures were developed. The traditional survey based subjective data collection was combined with objective data collection methodology in a reproducible way.

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal , vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

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Article
Publication date: 26 June 2019

Emmelie Gustafsson, Patrik Jonsson and Jan Holmström

In retail, product fitting is a critical operational practice. For many products, the operational outcome of the retail supply chain is determined by the customer…

Abstract

Purpose

In retail, product fitting is a critical operational practice. For many products, the operational outcome of the retail supply chain is determined by the customer physically fitting products. Digital product fitting is an emerging operational practice in retail that uses digital models of products and customers to match product supply to customer requirements. This paper aims to explore potential supply chain outcomes of digitalizing the operational practice of product fitting. The purpose is to explore and propose the potential of the practice to improve responsiveness to customer requirements and the utilization of existing variety in mass-produced products.

Design/methodology/approach

A maturity model of product fitting is developed to specify three levels of digitalization and potential outcomes for each level. Potential outcomes are developed based on empirical data from a case survey of three technology-developing companies, 13 retail cases and a review of academic literature.

Findings

With increasing maturity of digital product fitting, the practice can be used for more purposes. Besides matching product supply to customer demand, the practice can improve material flows, customer relationship management, assortment planning and product development. The practice of digital product fitting is most relevant for products where the final product configuration is difficult to make to order, product and customer attributes are easily measurable and tacit knowledge of customers and products can be formalized using digital modeling.

Research limitations/implications

Potential outcomes are conceptualized and proposed. Further research is needed to observe actual outcomes and understand the mechanisms for both proposed and surprising outcomes in specific contexts.

Practical implications

The maturity model helps companies assess how their operations can benefit from digital product fitting and the efforts required to achieve beneficial outcomes.

Originality/value

This paper is a first attempt to describe the potential outcomes of introducing digital product fitting in retail supply chains.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 30 January 2015

Angela Maria Alves, Marcelo Pessoa and Clênio F Salviano

– The purpose of this paper is to address the development of a conceptual framework to drive and assess the quality of software production in the digital ecosystem domain.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address the development of a conceptual framework to drive and assess the quality of software production in the digital ecosystem domain.

Design/methodology/approach

This research used action research paradigm, the soft methodology SSM and the framework PRO2PI-MFMOD. The methodologies were applied at Brazilian Public Software Ecosystem.

Findings

The results of this research shows: the dimension of the capacity, as suggested by ISO/IEC 15504, is insufficient for quality treatment in certain domains; SSM methodology is suitable for scope and domain clarification in digital ecosystems; and PRO2PI-MFMOD framework is suitable to create a reference model process for digital ecosystems software production.

Research limitations/implications

A complete SSM cycle was conducted, but with only one research cycle. In that sense, the results obtained in this research can be interpreted as boundaries to reflections regarding the learning occurred in the system.

Practical implications

The research offers an empirical contribution, mapping and defining maturity framework elements that can be used by the software production digital ecosystems, aiming the description and understanding of the phenomenon through the theoretical views of complexity theory, systemic thinking, digital ecosystems and maturity models.

Social implications

The contributions can be summarized in the following aspects: the maturity models evolution, shifting from command and control basis to cooperation and connection basis; the maturity models scope, drifting from organizational units to collaborative networks of software production; the assimilation and broadcast of digital ecosystems concept by MCTI; and the maturity levels introduced in the research can be used as a particular case of capacity dimension of the further ISO/IEC 33000 standards.

Originality/value

Through the results obtained with systematic revision of the literature, one can notice the absence of publications that approach all the four axes that ground this research simultaneously. The proposed subject is original and relevant to the software community in the matter of software process improvement and to the current and further public digital ecosystems of software development.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

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Article
Publication date: 19 September 2018

Fatemeh Sheikhshoaei, Nader Naghshineh, Sirous Alidousti and Maryam Nakhoda

There are many challenges in the development of a digital library (DL) and their complexity can be approached effectively with a maturity model. In a maturity model, the…

Abstract

Purpose

There are many challenges in the development of a digital library (DL) and their complexity can be approached effectively with a maturity model. In a maturity model, the features of a phenomenon are divided into different levels and at each level, they are first improved before going on to the improvement or realization of the next level. The purpose of this study is to design a digital library maturity model (DLMM) in Iran.

Design/methodology/approach

The DLMM was designed using a qualitative approach, meta-synthesis and the Delphi technique. First, the maturity features of a DL were identified by assessing 68 sources of study concerning DLs and maturity models using meta-synthesis. The maturity features were then validated by experts using the three-round Delphi technique. Finally, the experts were asked to categorize these features into the five levels of the capability maturity model (CMM) as the base model.

Findings

By analyzing these sources, three categories, seven concepts and 35 codes for the maturity features of a DL were identified. The majority of previous studies focused on the use of hardware/software systems as the backup and empowerment of DLs and the concept of DL content. The maturity features were then validated by experts using the three-round Delphi technique. Like the base model, DLMM has five levels, and most features were categorized into the third and fourth levels by the experts. Features such as human resources, needs assessment of DL and readiness to create a DL were included in the second level.

Originality/value

This work adds the concept of the maturity model to the literature of DLs.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 36 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article
Publication date: 22 July 2019

David Rader

Abstract

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 47 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2020

Rafael Lorenz, Christoph Benninghaus, Thomas Friedli and Torbjørn H. Netland

Manufacturers seek to innovate and improve processes using new digital technologies. However, knowledge about these new technologies often resides outside a firm's…

Abstract

Purpose

Manufacturers seek to innovate and improve processes using new digital technologies. However, knowledge about these new technologies often resides outside a firm's boundaries. The authors draw on the concept of absorptive capacity and the literature on open innovation to explore the role of external search in the digitization of manufacturing.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors developed and distributed a survey to manufacturing firms in Switzerland, for which 151 complete responses were received from senior managers. The authors used multiple linear regressions to study the relations among the breadth and depth of external search, firms' adoption of digital technologies and operational performance outcomes.

Findings

External search depth was found to relate positively to higher adoption of computing technologies and shop floor connectivity technologies. No significant correlation was found between external search breadth and firms' adoption of digital technologies. Regarding performance outcomes, there is some evidence that increased adoption of digital technologies relates positively to higher volume flexibility, but not to increased production cost competitiveness.

Practical implications

Manufacturing firms that aim to digitize their processes can benefit from inbound open process innovation, but its utility varies for different clusters of digital technologies. Generally, the findings suggest that firms should build strong ties with a few external knowledge partners rather than surface relations with many.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the growing literature on the digitization of manufacturing with an analysis of the relation between firms' external search and their adoption of digital technologies. It adds early empirical insights to the literature on open process innovation.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 40 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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