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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2019

Raine Isaksson

Sustainability reports (SRs) could be viewed as organisational measurements of sustainability performance. The purpose of this paper is to discuss how well SRs are…

Abstract

Purpose

Sustainability reports (SRs) could be viewed as organisational measurements of sustainability performance. The purpose of this paper is to discuss how well SRs are measuring and communicating sustainability and how reporting could be assessed and improved by presenting a maturity grid based on quality management principles.

Design/methodology/approach

Quality management students have assessed publicly available SRs. A total of 55 student assessments have been analysed by the author and used to indicate how understandable reports are. Quality management principles and input from the student assessments have been used to propose a maturity grid for sustainability reporting quality.

Findings

The indication is that SRs are not easy to interpret. The word sustainability aspect used should be replaced with impact on vital stakeholder needs. Guidelines for analysing reports could be improved by using process focus to clearly describe scope of reporting as the entire value chain.

Research limitations/implications

Results are limited to assessing how sustainability is measured. How sustainable the organisations are is not assessed. The research is ongoing, and the proposed matrix is preliminary needing validation and further modification.

Practical implications

The proposed maturity grid for sustainability reporting forms a good basis for further development of SRs and the critical review of them.

Social implications

Results indicate a need to report sustainability in the entire value chain and to focus more on vital stakeholder needs such as poverty and climate change.

Originality/value

The paper discusses a field of synergies between quality and sustainability management, which is important but still sparingly researched.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

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Article
Publication date: 8 January 2018

Odysseas Moschidis, Evrikleia Chatzipetrou and George Tsiotras

The purpose of this paper is to explore how the sophistication of a quality costing system depends on the quality management maturity (QMM) level in Food and Beverage…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how the sophistication of a quality costing system depends on the quality management maturity (QMM) level in Food and Beverage (F&B) enterprises. Since no previous research has taken place in this area, the paper aims at analyzing the relationships between quality costing and the specific variables that define the various maturity stages.

Design/methodology/approach

A structured questionnaire was used to survey 457 F&B companies. This produced 104 usable responses (23 percent response rate). Multidimensional correspondence analysis (MCA) with hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) were used to detect and represent underlying structures in the categorical data set and to detect possible clusters between variables.

Findings

The more mature a company’s QMM, the more emphasis they placed on appraisal quality costs and effective use of quality costs information. Prevention costs have no statistically significant connection with the level of maturity. A generalized “expensive” use of quality costing, with no focus on problematic areas and possible solutions, does not always lead to the resolution of problems.

Research limitations/implications

A complicated – and some think unfair – tax system, combined with limited cash liquidity constitutes an unstable environment for Greek companies, in which they have to survive and develop. This environment does not support quality costing, thus resulting in limited interest by company management in participating in the authors’ research. Furthermore, the Greek Uniform Chart of Accounts and the Greek Accounting Standards do not include specific quality-related accounts, making it difficult for companies to measure quality costs and for researchers to investigate the quality costing field.

Originality/value

It is the first time that QMM levels of Greek F&B companies have been reported. The research explores the characteristics that a quality costing system of Greek F&B organizations develop at the various maturity levels. The analysis uses an exploratory method – MCA – which can highlight intense correspondences of characteristics and clusters, which cannot be predicted in advance.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 67 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Article
Publication date: 14 December 2018

Carlos Abraham Moya, Daniel Galvez, Laurent Muller and Mauricio Camargo

The purpose of this paper is to propose an assessment approach to evaluate the organizational capabilities to deploy a Lean Six Sigma (LSS) strategy.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose an assessment approach to evaluate the organizational capabilities to deploy a Lean Six Sigma (LSS) strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a comprehensive literature review, critical success factors required to deploy LSS were defined. These key factors are evaluated by a questionnaire based on maturity grids and structured as a multi-criteria model to compute a potential LSS performance indicator. This approach is illustrated through two case studies.

Findings

To promote a successful implementation of LSS in SMEs, it is necessary to consider five main critical factors. The evaluation of these factors could be achieved thanks to a multi-criterion-based maturity indicator for the LSS implementation. The case studies show that this approach allows SMEs to understand their strengths and weaknesses and thus better prepare the implementation of LSS.

Research limitations/implications

The proposed tool identifies characteristics of companies leading to successful LSS implementation; but is not yet able to provide a detailed strategy to improve them. The case studies were applied to manufacturing companies; therefore, there is no evidence of conclusions in the context of services.

Practical implications

The proposed methodology will help managers and practitioners to evaluate the readiness level of a company to implement LSS. Then, they could estimate the effort required to achieve the LSS deployment.

Originality/value

This paper proposes a new metric of the capacity to implement the LSS successfully in SMEs: the Lean Six Sigma Global Index. This indicator is based on a survey completed by managers and supported by observable phenomena to establish a tailored diagnosis before the LSS implementation.

Details

International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-4166

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Article
Publication date: 7 January 2014

Dayu Jin, Kah-Hin Chai and Kay-Chuan Tan

– The purpose of this paper is to rigorously devise a new tool that helps analyze and improve NSD processes.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to rigorously devise a new tool that helps analyze and improve NSD processes.

Design/methodology/approach

An NSD maturity model (NSDMM) is theoretically developed through a combination of the maturity model concept and findings from NSD success studies.

Findings

NSD success factors can be categorized into four management processes – strategy management, process formalization, knowledge management, and customer involvement. Maturity dimensions and levels are further devised for each process. It is hypothesized that a higher capability to handle these processes positively associates with higher NSD performance.

Research limitations/implications

Studies on NSD success factors are often descriptive rather than prescriptive. This research identified four management processes which are important to focus on when implementing NSD projects. It is among the first to apply the maturity model in the service industry. That said, this research needs to be tested empirically.

Practical implications

The proposed NSDMM enables companies to conduct evaluations of their NSD capabilities. By determining the desired maturity levels, companies can engage in continuous improvement so as to calibrate the NSD process.

Originality/value

By integrating the concept of the maturity model and the NSD success studies, NSDMM serves not only as a diagnostic model to assess current NSD practices, but also as a guideline for continuous NSD process improvement.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

James Moultrie, P. John Clarkson and David Probert

The creation of well‐designed products is widely acknowledged as an important contributor to company success. In principle, an effective design process, as part of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The creation of well‐designed products is widely acknowledged as an important contributor to company success. In principle, an effective design process, as part of the wider new product development (NPD) process, should result in well‐designed products. This paper aims to present a tool to enable a design team to evaluate their design process in a workshop setting, with a view to targeting improvements.

Design/methodology/approach

This tool is based on literature and has been iteratively developed using a mixed research approach, including detailed exploratory cases and application in action research mode.

Findings

The resulting tool comprises two main components. A “process audit” based on process maturity principles, which targets the design‐related activities in NPD. The process audit enables a company team to identify improvement opportunities in the design process. A product audit enables perceptions towards product characteristics to be assessed. The audit tool does not seek to be a benchmarking tool, but aims to capture “good design” principles in a form which is accessible and useful to practitioners.

Practical implications

In use, the tool enabled managers to balance their concern with meeting budget and timescale demands against the importance of producing well‐designed products. By first focusing on the tangible output of the design process – the product – practitioners are better able to understand the way in which design decisions influence product usability, desirability and producibility. Evidence from cases confirms the value and originality of this tool.

Originality/value

Previous tools addressing product development have focused on strategic and managerial concerns. This novel assessment tool focuses explicitly on design issues, within the wider context of NPD.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 55 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2014

Beverly Pasian

The conceptual and modularization of project management maturity models is based on the principle of process control. This research was designed to challenge these…

Abstract

Purpose

The conceptual and modularization of project management maturity models is based on the principle of process control. This research was designed to challenge these boundaries to reveal non-process factors. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

A multimethod research design was used with a “qual⇒Qual” sequence. This is a development in MM design theory, with its reliance on an initial qualitative stage that, despite being first, is insufficient to collecting sufficient data to answer the research question. A second stage, involving a more dominant qualitative, is necessary.

Findings

Multiple non-process factors are attributed to a mature project management capability responsible for undefined projects. They include “human factors” such as trust, attitude, motivation and attitude, along with increased customer involvement and a more adaptable organizational environment.

Research limitations/implications

The challenge put forward in this research was for project management maturity theorists to recognize the possibility of finding maturity in a project management capability responsible for undefined projects. This challenge has been met. The focus can now turn to other environments where other project types (undefined or not) are also being managed using processes (and/or practices) that are not necessarily definable, repeatable, predictable and unique to that setting.

Originality/value

An adaptable model has been created that contains multiple factors that can be used in their current relationships or changed to accommodate multiple project and project management scenarios. Further work will create weights for each factor that will further specify the relative value of each, thereby enhancing the adaptable nature of the model.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

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Article
Publication date: 22 March 2011

Torbjörn H. Netland and Erlend Alfnes

The purpose of this paper is to propose a quick maturity test to assist a company's development of a supply chain operations strategy. Maturity tests and models have been

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a quick maturity test to assist a company's development of a supply chain operations strategy. Maturity tests and models have been developed within several areas, but there is a lack of maturity tests targeting supply chain operations.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review on maturity models is carried out in order to build the structure of the test, while a literature review on best practices in supply chain management is the basis for the test content.

Findings

The proposed maturity test is an audit scheme built on best practice statements within seven key strategic decision areas – strategy, control, processes, materials, resources, information and organisation. The test is designed with simplicity as a key feature and takes only one hour to complete. The test results are the input to strategic decisions regarding use of best practices in supply chain operations.

Practical implications

Supply chain managers ask for a simple and quick tool that can be used as an eye‐opener and a compass early in the development process of the supply chain operations strategy. The proposed test has a proven potential to point out directions for supply chain improvement areas.

Originality/value

There is a need for a quick assessment tool for mapping the maturity of a company's supply chain operations. The proposed test is a potential answer to this need.

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

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Article
Publication date: 14 May 2018

El Mehdi Semma, Ahmed Mousrij and Hassan Gziri

The purpose of this paper is to develop the different phases of the implementation of vibration-based maintenance (VBM). Then, the focus will be on the first two stages…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop the different phases of the implementation of vibration-based maintenance (VBM). Then, the focus will be on the first two stages, namely, the inventory and feasibility study where each step will be translated into a very detailed implementation process through an industrial case study.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on a state of art on the implementation of the VBM; a survey of national and international experts in the field of VBM and finally an analysis of 30 years of VBM practice in a large Moroccan company in the field of chemical processing, via a collective approach called Diagnostic Court Autonome.

Findings

The study showed that improving productivity by reducing downtimes due to vibration defects through effective vibration monitoring is possible and investment in equipment and vibration monitoring personnel is largely justified in the company studied.

Originality/value

This paper presents in detail the two preliminary phases with all procedures describing in a practical way the operating rules to apply and organize the roles of different actors. The work will be useful both to researchers and maintenance managers interested in structuring their vibration monitoring cells.

Details

Journal of Quality in Maintenance Engineering, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2511

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1996

Luís María R. Calingo

Strategic quality management represents a state wherein the organization’s total quality management (TQM) system is tightly interwoven with the strategy formulation…

Abstract

Strategic quality management represents a state wherein the organization’s total quality management (TQM) system is tightly interwoven with the strategy formulation process, thereby contributing to a sustainable competitive advantage. Numerous models have been proposed to describe how organizations can fully integrate strategy and TQM. Proposes that organizations undergo evolutionary stages on the way to full integration of strategy and TQM. The conceptual bases of the proposed model consist of organizational life cycles, stages of quality maturity and models describing the evolution of strategic management. Gives examples of corporations in the USA and the Asia‐Pacific region which provide preliminary support for the model’s validity.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 13 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 September 2010

Sanjay Tiku and Michael Pecht

Reliability capability is a measure of the practices within an organization that contributes to the reliability of the final product and the effectiveness of these…

Abstract

Purpose

Reliability capability is a measure of the practices within an organization that contributes to the reliability of the final product and the effectiveness of these practices in meeting the reliability requirements of customers. The purpose of this paper is to propose a model for evaluating the reliability capability of electronics manufacturers.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey methodology and statistical methods based on multivariate correlational analysis were used to validate the model theoretically.

Findings

The result of the analysis is a list and ranking of tasks that are critical to the development of reliable electronics products.

Originality/value

The paper presents a generic model for evaluating both in‐house reliability practices and those of suppliers to identify areas for improvement and for evaluating improvements over time.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 27 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

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