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1 – 10 of 10
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1993

Dhan Bhandari

Reviews the factors affecting bread‐making quality in UK wheat:condition; milling quality (endosperm quality, high flour yield and goodflour colour); water absorption; baking…

Abstract

Reviews the factors affecting bread‐making quality in UK wheat: condition; milling quality (endosperm quality, high flour yield and good flour colour); water absorption; baking quality; protein quantity and quality; α‐amylase activity.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 93 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 November 2023

Vinay Kandpal

This qualitative study aims to examine bankers’ perspectives regarding financial inclusion, the challenges it faces and the scope for improvement. This research proposes a…

Abstract

Purpose

This qualitative study aims to examine bankers’ perspectives regarding financial inclusion, the challenges it faces and the scope for improvement. This research proposes a financial inclusion model, considering the inputs received by bankers. Financial exclusion of different sections is an issue common to emerging countries.

Design/methodology/approach

Data for qualitative research were collected through interviews with bank officials. The information was gathered from 32 bankers from India’s several zones (North, South, West and East). The data were collected from bankers from different public and private sector banks. Thematic analysis was performed up to the point of saturation to study the response received from bankers.

Findings

Bank-related issues such as frequent computer problems, network connectivity problems, costs, a shortage of bank branches, fewer transactions through automated teller machines and a shortage of banking staff affect customers’ confidence in formal banking. Banking services are disrupted by a lack of trust in banking correspondents (BCs), as they are not regular employees of banks. Limits on daily transactions discourage high-value customers from using BCs and kiosks. The time spent on administrative formalities impacts customers. Financial inclusion is affected by availability, accessibility, usage and affordability. Digital financial literacy is essential for ease of transaction, but awareness about financial products helps protect customers from cyber scams. The findings of this research would benefit financial institutions globally in developing their businesses and helping to achieve financial inclusion and the United Nation’s sustainable development goals (SDGs).

Originality/value

This research paper undertakes a qualitative analysis of the views collected from bankers. Bankers are crucial stakeholders in the successful implementation of the National Financial Inclusion Policy of the Government of India. Bankers’ perspectives will be important not only for India and its researchers but also in the global context, as the UN’s SDGs focus on leaving no one behind.

Details

Qualitative Research in Financial Markets, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4179

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 25 September 2020

Peterson K. Ozili

Purpose: This purpose of this chapter is to present several theories of financial inclusion. Financial inclusion is the ease of access to, and the availability of, basic financial…

Abstract

Purpose: This purpose of this chapter is to present several theories of financial inclusion. Financial inclusion is the ease of access to, and the availability of, basic financial services to all members of the population. Financial inclusion means that individuals and businesses have access to useful and affordable financial products and services that meet their needs in a responsible and sustainable way. Financial inclusion practices vary from country to country, and there is need to identify the underlying principles or propositions that can explain the observed variation in financial inclusion practices. These set of principles or propositions are called theories.

Methods: The chapter uses conceptual discussions to formulate alternative theories of financial inclusion.

Findings: The study shows that financial inclusion theories are explanations for observed financial inclusion practices. It also shows that the ideas and perspectives on financial inclusion can be grouped into theories to facilitate meaningful discussions in the literature.

Originality/value: Currently, there are no observed or elaborate theories of financial inclusion in the policy or academic literature. This chapter is the first attempt to develop theories of financial inclusion. The theories are intended to be useful to researchers, academics and practitioners. The resulting contributions to theory development are useful to the problem-solving process in the global financial inclusion agenda.

Article
Publication date: 25 October 2022

Jeevan Karki, Steve Matthewman and Jesse Hession Grayman

This paper aims to critically examine the post-disaster emergency response amongst marginalised and disadvantaged social groups following the 2015 Nepal Earthquake (7.8 Mw).

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to critically examine the post-disaster emergency response amongst marginalised and disadvantaged social groups following the 2015 Nepal Earthquake (7.8 Mw).

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative research method was employed by conducting interviews with disaster survivors from marginalised and ethnic social groups, humanitarian aid workers and government officials in the four districts worst hit by the 2015 Nepal Earthquake.

Findings

This research found that community members demonstrated remarkable cooperation in the aftermath of the disaster; however, caste-based discrimination still manifested in post-earthquake emergency environments. Further, this research showed that the engagement of government and local and international humanitarian organisations was noteworthy in the earthquake emergency response in Nepal as it localised relief packages and adapted the assistance corresponding to the fast-changing post-disaster environments. However, some relief materials were culturally inappropriate and climatically unsuitable. This paper also shows that the poor dissemination of relief distribution plans, resource duplication and ineffective targeting disproportionately impacted the oppressed and marginalised households in receiving humanitarian assistance.

Originality/value

Studies have been undertaken on the emergency response to the 2015 Nepal Earthquake, however, few have focussed on the lived experience of marginalised and disadvantaged social groups. Further, this research builds on, and contributes to, the humanitarian mobile sovereignty discourse.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 January 2023

Hardik Marfatia

Financial market holds superior information that can give insights into the future trajectory of economic growth. Further, identifying sectors that hold the key to future economic…

Abstract

Purpose

Financial market holds superior information that can give insights into the future trajectory of economic growth. Further, identifying sectors that hold the key to future economic growth is important for all economies, but particularly relevant to emerging markets. However, unlike existing studies, the paper provides new insights into the forward-oriented nexus between financial markets and economic growth.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper takes a forward-looking approach of using financial market information to predict future economic growth. The authors use ARDL modeling approach to predict economic growth using the information from stock market sectoral returns.

Findings

The authors find that sectoral stock returns significantly improve economic growth forecasts. However, the forecasting superiority is not uniform across sectors and horizons. Auto, consumers' spending, materials and realty sectors provide the most forecasting gains. In contrast, banking, capital goods and industrial sectors provide superior forecasts, but only at horizons beyond one year. The authors also find that the forecast superiority of sectors at longer horizons is inversely related to volatility.

Research limitations/implications

Research highlights the need for sector-focused policy actions in driving economic growth. Further, the findings of the paper identify sectors that drive short-, medium- and long-term economic growth.

Practical implications

There is a significant heterogeneity among different sectors and across horizons in predicting economic growth. Results suggest that targeted policy actions in sectors like materials, metals, oil and gas, and realty are key in driving economic growth. Further, policies geared toward the grassroots industries are at least as beneficial as the large-scale industries. Evidence also suggests the need for an active fiscal policy to address infrastructural bottlenecks in primary industries like basic materials and energy. Evidence nevertheless does not undermine the role of monetary policy actions.

Originality/value

Unlike any paper till date, the innovation of the paper is that it takes an ARDL modeling approach to measure stock market sectoral returns' ability to forecast economic growth several months ahead in the future. Though the paper considers the Indian case, the innovation and contribution extents to the entire field of economic studies.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 50 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 August 2020

D.V.P. Prasada

Rice is the primary staple crop in South Asia and is cultivated mainly on lowland ecosystems usually fed by the monsoon. With increasing climatic volatility, exclusively rain-fed…

Abstract

Purpose

Rice is the primary staple crop in South Asia and is cultivated mainly on lowland ecosystems usually fed by the monsoon. With increasing climatic volatility, exclusively rain-fed rice paddies have experienced a triple threat in droughts, floods and salinity. This study investigates the linkages of these abiotic stresses on yield and subsequent farmer decisions on varietal choice.

Design/methodology/approach

A path analytic model is conceptualized where the relationship between yield (conditional on abiotic stresses) and the varietal choice decision is mediated by adaptation motive (latent construct) and market exposure (observed construct). The path model is validated using 2,523 observations from Bangladesh farmers to obtain parameter estimates for direct effects and mediated effects indicated above.

Findings

Findings reveal that drought and flood impacts, in contrast to salinity impacts, are influential to both yield and varietal choice. The adaptation motive, however, is clear only in the case of salinity. Time preference of farmers and previous exposure to climate shocks predict adaptation motive substantively. The study reveals that market exposure is also a significant mediator of varietal choice in addition to the mediating effect of adaptation.

Research limitations/implications

The study adopts a path analytic model which is able to capture direct, indirect and mediated effects between exogenous factors and varietal choice decision. While the models provide conclusive statistical evidence to the above hypotheses, within-area variations of behavior may not be captured adequately by the method.

Originality/value

Analyzing the complexity of varietal decision-making choice using a path analytical model is a novel contribution to the literature. The application itself is unique to the context applied. The findings complement the literature on varietal adoption in the context of climate resilient paddy systems.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Pallavi Mathur and Parul Agarwal

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of self-help groups (SHGs) in providing an environment for the empowerment of Indian rural women. The authors argue that the SHG…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of self-help groups (SHGs) in providing an environment for the empowerment of Indian rural women. The authors argue that the SHG empowerment strategy paves the way for the process of development of bottom-up empowerment of women. The authors argue that SHG is a systematic strategy and is not solely based on credit, but also incorporates many other dimensions necessarily required for developing an empowerment process.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative study was the choice of design due to the inherent inability of the structured surveys to understand women empowerment (Mayoux, 1998), as this study was basically interested in the women’s perception of their own empowerment. To explore their experience, a series of semi-structured interviews and focus group discussions were conducted.

Findings

The authors stand by the application of SHG empowerment strategy in India and go against the rhetoric statements that “top to bottom” approach does not lead to a significant bottom-up empowerment.

Originality/value

The survey was conducted by the authors in the vicinity of rural Jaipur, Rajasthan, India. Moreover, during the survey, it was found out that participation in SHG facilitates women to know the current state of disempowerment and provides them strength, capacity to come out from the status of drudgery, poverty and seclusion.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 23 September 2016

Dhananjay Bapat, S. Sidharthan and C. Yogalakshmi

Financial Services Marketing, Financial Inclusion, Emerging Market Studies.

Abstract

Subject area

Financial Services Marketing, Financial Inclusion, Emerging Market Studies.

Study level/applicability

The case is suitable for graduate management students in courses such as general management and marketing courses. It is also suitable for a specialised rural marketing course and marketing of financial services. In business schools outside India, the case can be used in a course on marketing strategies for emerging economies. The case is suitable for executive development programmes for the areas pertaining to rural banking, marketing of banking services and financial inclusion programmes.

Case overview

The case analyses the financial inclusion initiative by Odisha Gramya Bank, a regional rural bank set up after amalgamation of three banks in the state of Orissa, India. The topic of financial inclusion has been the attraction from bankers, policymakers and academia in light of linkage between formal financial system and inclusive growth. To harness the fortunes at the bottom of pyramid, the case looks into the development of financial inclusion, business strategies and strategies for various customer segments.

Expected learning outcomes

To introduce students to analyse and compare various financial inclusion options. The case is useful to comprehend the various methods of financial inclusion. To analyse the evolution of regional rural banks and Odisha Gramya Bank after its amalgamation. To appreciate the issues faced by Odisha Gramya Bank. To understand various market segment and to evaluate its potential. To suggest appropriate strategies for each market segment. To appreciate how technology can be harnessed for business correspondents. To recommend the roadmap for financial inclusion to Mr Sidharthan, Chairman, Odisha Gramya Bank.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Subject code

CSS 8: Marketing.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 February 2024

Kuldeep Singh

This current study draws a comparison between the performance indicators of public sector banks (PSBs) and private sector banks (or non-PSBs) in India. The study controls for the…

Abstract

Purpose

This current study draws a comparison between the performance indicators of public sector banks (PSBs) and private sector banks (or non-PSBs) in India. The study controls for the impact of COVID-19.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses strongly balanced panel data for seven years of 12 PSBs and 10 non-PSBs from the Nifty PSU Bank Index and Nifty Private Bank Index. The study applies panel data methodology to arrive at the results.

Findings

The study demonstrates that the behavior of indicators of performance and returns volatility for PSBs and non-PSBs differs substantially. While factors like capital adequacy ratio (CAR), cost management (COST), liquidity (LIQ), inflation and economic growth exhibit a similar impact on both categories of Indian banks, the effect of credit risk (RISK), market power (POWER) and COVID-19 on performance and returns stability is different for PSBs and non-PSBs.

Research limitations/implications

There is a limited sample size of banks in India.

Practical implications

PSBs and non-PSBs need distinct treatments when calibrating performance indicators.

Social implications

The performance and stability of banks are essential for society at large, the depositors and the investors.

Originality/value

The study provides vibrant implications for insight for banks to calibrate the variables that determine performance and stability, regulators and policymakers for effective governance of the banking ecosystem and effective utilization of public funds and capital. The findings are relevant for policymaking today, when the government is considering the privatization of a few PSBs.

Details

Journal of Economic and Administrative Sciences, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1026-4116

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 September 2019

Bishwajit Nayak, Som Sekhar Bhattacharyya and Bala Krishnamoorthy

Social health insurance framework of any country is the national identifier of the country’s policy for taking care of its population which cannot access or afford quality…

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Abstract

Purpose

Social health insurance framework of any country is the national identifier of the country’s policy for taking care of its population which cannot access or afford quality healthcare. The purpose of this paper is to highlight the strategic imperatives of digital technology for the inclusive social health models for the BoP customers.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative exploratory study using in-depth personal interviews with 53 Indian health insurance CXOs was conducted with a semi-structured questionnaire. Using MaxQDA software, the interview transcripts were analyzed by means of thematic content analysis technique and patterns identified based on the expert opinions.

Findings

A framework for the strategic imperatives of digital technology in social health insurance emerged from the study highlighting three key themes for technology implementation in the social health insurance sector – analytics for risk management, cost optimization for operations and enhancement of customer experience. The study results provide key insights about how insurers can enhance the coverage of BoP population by leveraging technology.

Social implications

The framework would help health insurers and policymakers to select strategic choices related to technology that would enable creation of inclusive health insurance models for BoP customers.

Originality/value

The absence of specific studies highlighting the strategic digital imperatives in social health insurance creates a unique value proposition for this framework which can help health insurers in developing a convergence in their risk management and customer delight objectives and assist the government in the formulation of a sustainable social health insurance framework.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 39 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

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