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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2019

Md Abu Saleh, M. Yunus Ali, Ali Quazi and Deborah Blackman

The purpose of this paper is to explore international buyer–supplier relationships in an emerging developing country context. The study examines a number of factors…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore international buyer–supplier relationships in an emerging developing country context. The study examines a number of factors derived from internationalization process (IP) theory and their impacts in a novel research setting. The relational variables of trust and commitment, and their drivers, are integrated into a model examining importers’ perspectives of their supplier relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

This study applied a sequential methodological approach. Initially, a conceptual framework was developed from qualitative research and then quantitatively validated using structural equation modeling (SEM). The data for this study were collected conducting in-depth interviews and survey questionnaires. For empirical validation, the SEM technique was applied to assess the proposed model.

Findings

Importing firm managers perceived that the commitment of their suppliers bolstered their trust in the relationship, this contrasts with the conventional contention of a reverse relationship. The findings confirm cultural similarity facilitates communication, leading to increased knowledge and experience of importers, thereby contributing to an enhanced commitment to build trust in the relationship.

Practical implications

The conceptual framework developed in this study provides a direction to manage and enhance understanding of IP and relationship outcome. The findings have strategic implications for practicing managers in developing and supporting their importer–foreign supplier relationships.

Originality/value

This study is unique in assessing as well as validating key constructs of IP theory in an international exchange (importer–supplier) relationship. The study offers completely a new insight in relation to applying IP theory’s relational perspectives.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

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Article
Publication date: 16 August 2021

Abhilash Acharya and Bijaya Mishra

This paper aims to understand in-depth the concepts applied to the domains of organizational learning (OL) and learning organization, based on the notional perspectives of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to understand in-depth the concepts applied to the domains of organizational learning (OL) and learning organization, based on the notional perspectives of Professor Deborah Blackman and traces the evolutionary path of her academic journey and contributions in this regard.

Design/methodology/approach

A conversation with the distinguished academician, Professor Deborah Blackman.

Findings

How OL has pivoted around “shared mental models” that will enable in collective evidence-based decision-making across the organizational hierarchy.

Originality/value

The interactive session with Professor Deborah Blackman captured her ideas and critique pertaining to the theme of OL and the crucial aspect of “shared mental models” which promote “learning” in an organization. Delving deeper, it is seen that this trajectory offers the space and orientation to researchers and professionals to verify.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 18 April 2008

Deborah Blackman

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316

Abstract

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2015

Fiona Buick, Deborah Ann Blackman, Michael Edward O'Donnell, Janine Louise O'Flynn and Damian West

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the potential role that performance management could play in enabling employees’ adaptability to change and, therefore, successful…

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4036

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the potential role that performance management could play in enabling employees’ adaptability to change and, therefore, successful change implementation.

Design/methodology/approach

This research adopted a qualitative case study research design, focussed on seven case studies within the Australian Public Service (APS). This study utilized documentary analysis, semi-structured individual and group interviews.

Findings

The findings of this research demonstrate that adaptability to change is integral for high performance; however, the constant change faced by many public servants is disruptive. The authors posit that applying a performance framework developed by Blackman et al. (2013a, b) to change implementation will help overcome, or at least mitigate, these issues. The authors argue that applying this framework will: enable adaptability to change; and provide an ongoing management function that enables change to occur.

Research limitations/implications

This research has been limited to seven organizations within the APS, yet it does reveal interesting implications in terms of the apparent role of performance management in both developing change capacity and supporting espoused outcomes.

Practical implications

This research identifies the potential role that performance management can play in supporting effective change implementation through enabling employees to cope better with the change through enabling clarity, purpose and alignment with the organizational direction.

Originality/value

The originality of this paper stems from the synthesis of different strands of literature, specifically high performance, performance management and change management, and empirical research in the public sector to provide a new way of looking at performance management as a change enabler.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 23 October 2009

Deborah Blackman and Monica Kennedy

The purpose of this paper is to describe the relationship between governance and knowledge management in an Australian university, paying attention to the ways in which

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3879

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the relationship between governance and knowledge management in an Australian university, paying attention to the ways in which the notions of knowledge, constructions of the role of governing councils and shared understandings about performance in committee roles, might impact on the university's future success.

Design/methodology/approach

Earl's taxonomy of knowledge is extended to reflect more recent literature and used as the framework of analysis for a qualitative case study which is based on observations and interview data garnered from key governance committees.

Findings

The paper illustrates that effective governance and strategic success are dependent on appropriate knowledge manipulation activities. The authors conclude that in the case example, the types of knowledge targeted are narrow and committee members are focused on processes that do not effectively enable the creation or transfer of knowledge.

Research limitations/implications

This is a single case study and further research would be required in order to confirm the exploratory findings.

Practical implications

An important shift in improving effective knowledge strategies in the organisation will involve the reconceptualisation of the role of knowledge in the university.

Originality/value

This paper makes two major contributions to the literature; the extension of Earl's typology to reflect current knowledge management literature, and the identification of a lack of knowledge management as a major weakness in university governance. The paper begins to unravel the practical issues that constrain strategic decision making.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 13 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1991

Clare Kelliher and Deborah Blackman

The potential implications of the European Social Charter forfuture human resource strategy within the UK hospitality industry isexplored. Four key areas which were…

Abstract

The potential implications of the European Social Charter for future human resource strategy within the UK hospitality industry is explored. Four key areas which were subject to change during the 1980s and which are likely to be affected by the proposed Community agreements are identified. This provides a backdrop against which possible results are discussed and some broad conceptual changes in strategy are postulated.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1993

Kevin Doren and Deborah Blackman

The advancement of technology and intelligence in most industrieshas been linked with the concepts of connectivity and the development ofopen systems. Currently the…

Abstract

The advancement of technology and intelligence in most industries has been linked with the concepts of connectivity and the development of open systems. Currently the protocols found in the hotel and catering industry are not compatible between companies and/or products. First addresses the implications of this and then the advantages to the industry, should open systems be developed and standards set up for future installations. Such systems are becoming standardized in the Far East and concludes that the hotel and catering industry must follow suit if really “Intelligent Rooms” are to be developed.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 23 May 2008

Deborah Blackman

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340

Abstract

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2006

Deborah A. Blackman and Liz Lee‐Kelley

The purpose of this paper is to argue that how HRD is undertaken needs careful consideration, since some HRD implementation schemes may actually prevent the acquisition of…

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4728

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to argue that how HRD is undertaken needs careful consideration, since some HRD implementation schemes may actually prevent the acquisition of new knowledge, thereby developing stagnation.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses qualitative data derived from learning and non‐learning organisations. The data were collected from four companies via open‐ended questionnaires and structured interviews.

Findings

The paper demonstrates how strongly shared mental models may affect organisational HRD processes in such a way as to trigger closure to new knowledge and learning. The types of learning and knowledge present in the organisations are found to limit the possibility of radical change.

Research limitations/implications

HRD implementation systems themselves may strengthen mental models, thereby allowing the difficulties to emerge because the learning and knowledge being developed will only support incremental change if any. The potential reversion of the direction of organisational learning is mooted, indicating that new ideas may either not enter the system or be rejected once they are perceived. HRD systems need to be designed to develop and maintain organisational openness.

Originality/value

The danger of HRD exacerbating organisational closure is explained. An alternative role for HRD professionals is outlined, with the new focus being on developing ongoing challenge at all times. The paper concludes that, although properly structured and thoughtfully implemented HRD can be a positive driver for organisational learning, HRD developments need to focus on the type of knowledge being developed as well as the level of learning.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 44 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Deborah Blackman and Steven Henderson

In this paper it is held that a transformational learning organisation could be clearly distinguished from non‐learning organisations. This paper seeks to establish…

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5824

Abstract

Purpose

In this paper it is held that a transformational learning organisation could be clearly distinguished from non‐learning organisations. This paper seeks to establish whether or not this is actually the case.

Design/methodology/approach

Case studies were developed for two organisations considering themselves to be learning organisations (Company 2 and Company 4) and two that did not (Company 1 and Company 3). To establish the balance of the learning behaviours within the firms according to Shivistrava's typology, a questionnaire was used to elicit information about learning behaviours and activities, and general understanding about what such terms as knowledge, information and learning meant to individuals within the firms.

Findings

The results of applying the Shrivastava model showed that most knowledge is action‐oriented and incrementally developed, in that it is developed in order to achieve a certain goal. Certain events will lead to a perceived need for certain behaviours and the organisational procedures and policies will encourage actions.

Originality/value

Shrivastava's typology outlines four perspectives of organisational learning: adaptation, developing knowledge of action‐outcome relationships, assumption sharing, and institutionalised experience. These definitions imply that they will reflect different knowledge bases.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

Keywords

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