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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2013

Michael Harvey, James B. Shaw, Ruth McPhail and Anthony Erickson

The purpose of the development of the paper was due to the seemingly endless searching for deans to replace the former dean of three to four years.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the development of the paper was due to the seemingly endless searching for deans to replace the former dean of three to four years.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper was developed around the present relevant secondary data.

Findings

The key findings of the paper were that deans were being replaced due to the difference in expectation of the various constituents (e.g. students, faculty, administration, parents) in the performance of the SBA.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations of the study were not providing primary data to support the theory based hypotheses of the study.

Practical implications

Deans need to recognize that there will be conflicting expectations relative to the performance of the dean and that deans have a very short time to effectuate change in academic organizations.

Social implications

Not having such high turnover in dean's positions should provide the stability of management to bring about change need in institutions of higher education.

Originality/value

Identification of key mistakes made by deans as well as the mistakes made by faculty undermine the performance of deans.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 20 June 2016

Awny Sayed and Amal Al Muqrishi

The purpose of this paper is to present an efficient and scalable Arabic semantic search engine based on a domain-specific ontological graph for Colleges of Applied…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present an efficient and scalable Arabic semantic search engine based on a domain-specific ontological graph for Colleges of Applied Science, Sultanate of Oman (CASOnto). It also supports the factorial question answering and uses two types of searching: the keyword-based search and the semantics-based search in both languages Arabic and English. This engine is built on variety of technologies such as resource description framework data and ontological graph. Furthermore, two experimental results are conducted; the first is a comparison among entity-search and the classical-search in the system itself. The second compares the CASOnto with well-known semantic search engines such as Kngine, Wolfram Alpha and Google to measure their performance and efficiency.

Design/methodology/approach

The design and implementation of the system comprises the following phases, namely, designing inference, storing, indexing, searching, query processing and the user’s friendly interface, where it is designed based on a specific domain of the IBRI CAS (College of Applied Science) to highlight the academic and nonacademic departments. Furthermore, it is ontological inferred data stored in the tuple data base (TDB) and MySQL to handle the keyword-based search as well as entity-based search. The indexing and searching processes are built based on the Lucene for the keyword search, while TDB is used for the entity search. Query processing is a very important component in the search engines that helps to improve the user’s search results and make the system efficient and scalable. CASOnto handles the Arabic issues such as spelling correction, query completion, stop words’ removal and diacritics removal. It also supports the analysis of the factorial question answering.

Findings

In this paper, an efficient and scalable Arabic semantic search engine is proposed. The results show that the semantic search that built on the SPARQL is better than the classical search in both simple and complex queries. Clearly, the accuracy of semantic search equals to 100 per cent in both types of queries. On the other hand, the comparison of CASOnto with the Wolfram Alpha, Kngine and Google refers to better results by CASOnto. Consequently, it seems that our proposed engine retrieved better and efficient results than other engines. Thus, it is built according to the ontological domain-specific, highly scalable performance and handles the complex queries well by understanding the context behind the query.

Research limitations/implications

The proposed engine is built on a specific domain (CAS Ibri – Oman), and in the future vision, it will highlight the nonfactorial question answering and expand the domain of CASOnto to involve more integrated different domains.

Originality/value

The main contribution of this paper is to build an efficient and scalable Arabic semantic search engine. Because of the widespread use of search engines, a new dimension of challenge is created to keep up with the evolution of the semantic Web. Whereas, catering to the needs of users has become a matter of paramount importance in the light of artificial intelligence and technological development to access the accurate and the efficient information in less possible time. However, the research challenges still in its infancy due to lack of research engine that supports the Arabic language. It could be traced back to the complexity of the Arabic language morphological and grammar rules.

Details

International Journal of Web Information Systems, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-0084

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Book part
Publication date: 30 November 2018

Katarzyna Górak-Sosnowska

Management of students’ affairs constitutes one of the key elements of the educational process, even though neglected and often treated as a minor issue. In all Polish…

Abstract

Management of students’ affairs constitutes one of the key elements of the educational process, even though neglected and often treated as a minor issue. In all Polish higher education institutions (HEIs) the units charged with this administrative task are dean’s offices (in Polish, dziekanaty). The pace of work of dean’s offices is related to the schedule of the academic year. While resources are constant throughout the year, the workload differs significantly and peaks around October, when not only the new semester begins but also many students defend their theses and need to receive their award certificates. Work at dean’s office is therefore often demanding with many tasks cumulated in the same very short period of time and repeatable, that is, as many times as the number of students, which can be from 350 to over 700 per employee. This chapter examines innovative ways of managing students’ affairs at selected Polish HEIs. These innovations can be either top-down, that is, provided by HEI authorities responding to the needs of dean’s offices, or bottom-up, that is, worked out by the dean’s office staff (often due to lacking support of HEIs authorities).

Details

The Future of Innovation and Technology in Education: Policies and Practices for Teaching and Learning Excellence
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-555-5

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Book part
Publication date: 8 June 2007

Nabil Elias and William W. Notz

Like conflict in general, budgetary conflict is perceived by conflicting parties as a zero-sum game or distributive: one party's gain is the other party's loss. We…

Abstract

Like conflict in general, budgetary conflict is perceived by conflicting parties as a zero-sum game or distributive: one party's gain is the other party's loss. We identify an organizational culture that promotes this view as “traditional.” We propose that changing certain elements of organizational culture is sufficient to produce more integrative, nonzero-sum outcomes. We call this changed organizational culture “empowering.” We propose and test the effects of an empowering organizational culture (EOC) in contrast to the traditional organizational culture (TOC). We hypothesize that an EOC would produce more integrative conflict resolution than the typical TOC. Based on our review of the literature, we identify two elements of the EOC that are essential in producing more integrative solutions to budgetary conflict. The two elements that we simultaneously manipulate are the superior's empowering style (or lack thereof) as reflected in encouragement to freely negotiate, and the superior's intervention process in failed negotiations (a process that encourages the search for integrative solutions and avoids imposed compromises that dampen the desire to negotiate). Using a laboratory experiment, 84 subjects forming 42 dyads negotiated the allocation of discretionary budgets face-to-face. The results of the experiment confirm our hypotheses that the EOC produces more integrative budget negotiation outcomes, greater convergence, and greater satisfaction with the outcome than TOC.

Details

Advances in Management Accounting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1387-7

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Article
Publication date: 16 October 2009

Julie Davies and Howard Thomas

During the last 40 years, the growth and impact of UK business schools have been significant. Relatively few studies have reviewed how business school deans emerge and…

Abstract

Purpose

During the last 40 years, the growth and impact of UK business schools have been significant. Relatively few studies have reviewed how business school deans emerge and grow. This paper aims to explore the experiences and psychometric profiles of UK business school leaders to understand their tenures, problems, dilemmas and succession issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The study comprised 16 semi‐structured interviews with business school deans and Myers‐Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) questionnaires completed by deans and aspiring deans (associate deans and heads of department). The study uses the executive life cycle and concepts of social capital as theoretical frameworks to understand the dean's role.

Findings

The study revealed a pattern of individuals working in their first deanship at their third business school. Their career trajectories highlighted the usefulness of consultancy skills similar to those of a partner in a professional service firm. The importance of the dean's role in terms of business school fit, creating a differentiation strategy and team building were emphasised. The psychometric preferences of the deans in the sample indicated Jungian extroversion, tough mindedness, seeing patterns and making connections, strategic thinking and a tendency to bring issues to closure. Recommendations are made for the development of a more heterogeneous, transnational cadre of business school deans and improved dialogue with heads of universities to understand the positive contribution of business school leaders as changing business models are needed in turbulent times.

Originality/value

There are few explanations of the roles and functioning of business school deans in practice. The insights gained are valuable for business school deans and are, more broadly, of interest to heads of universities and executive search firms. The paper is theoretically and practically relevant to building leadership capabilities in knowledge intensive organisations and professional service firms.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 47 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Book part
Publication date: 24 July 2014

Anne C. Barnhart, Jean M. Cook, Jessica Critten, Angela Pashia, Andrea G. Stanfield and Dean Sullivan

Traditional interviewing techniques often fail to fully assess the “soft skills” required for a potential hire to succeed in a particular organizational culture. This case…

Abstract

Traditional interviewing techniques often fail to fully assess the “soft skills” required for a potential hire to succeed in a particular organizational culture. This case study presents an alternate framework for evaluating candidates to determine their ability to effectively collaborate with existing team members. The authors report the process used in hiring two faculty librarians in 2011 and the ways the process was revised to fill two newly created positions in 2013. A review of management literature on interview techniques supports using practical exercises and strategically designed questions to assess a candidate’s fit within a given organizational culture. The experiences reported in this case study bear that out. The process of strategically designing the interview structure enabled the department to gain a better vision of its priorities and values, while the interviews enabled the team to select additional members who work well in a collaborative environment with the personalities already in place. Readers can use this to redesign their interview procedures to more effectively select candidates who will contribute to the vision and positive culture of their workplace. This model was successful in this instance and readers can modify these procedures to adapt to their own workplace cultures in any type of library. Building on strategies used in various industries, this chapter translates the use of practical exercises and strategically designed questions into an academic library context.

Details

Advances in Librarianship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-469-5

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2013

Montserrat Garcia‐Alsina, Eva Ortoll and Josep Cobarsí‐Morales

This paper has a twofold aim. Firstly, to give some insight into competitive intelligence practices in a little‐explored area in the field of competitive intelligence: the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper has a twofold aim. Firstly, to give some insight into competitive intelligence practices in a little‐explored area in the field of competitive intelligence: the higher education sector. Secondly, to find out more about the factors influencing competitive intelligence practices, since little research on this subject has been published.

Design/methodology/approach

The investigation used a mixed‐methods approach, including face‐to‐face, semi structured interviews with 47 university managers (degree coordinators, deans and vice‐rectors), followed by a semi‐structured questionnaire carried out with 400 degree coordinators and deans and analysed quantitatively and qualitatively. The interviews informed the questionnaire design.

Findings

The survey confirms the proposed framework's usefulness for analysing the enabler and inhibitor factors in an organisation for promoting efficient competitive intelligence practice and also gives some insight into which factors enable or inhibit the efficacy of competitive intelligence practices in Spanish universities.

Research limitations/implications

The research focused on degree design adapted to the EHEA. A larger study designed to focus on other management areas in universities would provide a fuller picture of factors influencing competitive intelligence practices.

Practical implications

The findings indicate the areas where universities could plan actions to optimise intelligence activities, make the most of them and stand out from the rest.

Originality/value

This paper sets out a framework to describe factors related to intelligence function and cycle. In addition, the study reveals which indicators act as enablers or inhibitors for competitive intelligence practices and takes account of some of the particular features of the higher education sector.

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Book part
Publication date: 19 August 2015

Mark J. Zbaracki and Mark Bergen

We return to the problem that motivated the original behavioral theory of the firm, price adjustment, but from the standpoint of post-Carnegie School perspectives on…

Abstract

We return to the problem that motivated the original behavioral theory of the firm, price adjustment, but from the standpoint of post-Carnegie School perspectives on cognition, attention, and routines. Whereas work in the Carnegie School tradition has tended to develop models of firms in opposition to economic theory, we seek to understand how economic ideas are used to shape decision processes. Using a combination of interview, observational, and archival data gathered at a large manufacturing firm that produced parts to maintain machinery, we develop a behaviorally plausible story of how organizations shape price adjustment. We follow three successive waves of managers seeking to improve the pricing routines through shifting attentional perspective, managing attentional engagement, and structuring attentional execution. We demonstrate how managers redesign routines to shape cognition and attention, thereby developing greater coherence in the market representations of the sales force. Our findings show how reshaping cognition and attention in pricing routines can improve organizational intelligence in pricing decisions. Economists treat markets as the ideal – the best that can be imagined – and organizations as second-best options – the best that can be achieved, but our findings invert the story, suggesting that in modern market economies, organizations and routines are essential to making the price system work.

Details

Cognition and Strategy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-946-2

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Book part
Publication date: 7 September 2011

Norma T. Mertz

Myra Gordon (2004) argues that “the real reason for a general failure to diversify lies in the culture and practices typically associated with faculty hiring” (p. 184)…

Abstract

Myra Gordon (2004) argues that “the real reason for a general failure to diversify lies in the culture and practices typically associated with faculty hiring” (p. 184). This chapter examines the faculty hiring process and how it contributes to the underrepresentation of female faculty of color and to what happens to them if they are hired. Drawing on the existing literature and insights from critical theory and signal theory, the dissection of the process considers how institutionalized norms characteristic of the dominant group in the academy (white, males) play a role in the exclusion (oppression) of nontraditional candidates, and signal their fit with those norms.

Details

Women of Color in Higher Education: Changing Directions and New Perspectives
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-182-4

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Charles J. Fornaciari, John J. Sherlock, William J. Ritchie and Kathy Lund Dean

This study identified and analyzed the 29 empirical articles which created 65 new scales that were published from 1996–2004 within the Spirituality, Religion, and Work…

Abstract

This study identified and analyzed the 29 empirical articles which created 65 new scales that were published from 1996–2004 within the Spirituality, Religion, and Work (SRW) domain. Utilizing Hinkin's (1995) methodology for evaluating questionnaire scale development as a model, this study reviewed: (1) item generation issues such as inductive vs. deductive approaches; (2) scale development issues such as sampling and validity/reliability assessment; and (3) scale evaluation issues such as convergent validity testing. The study found that the vast majority of studies (86%) reported detail on the item development process for the new scales used; the primary method for item development was deductive, based on existing theory. In the area of scale development, only 45% of the studies reported using factor analysis for evaluation of constructs; of those that did, less than 25% of those reported information regarding factor retention criteria, such as eigenvalues. With regard to the internal consistency, the coefficient alpha was reported in only 45% of the studies. However, in those cases where scale development practices were described, the information was generally quite detailed and reflected statistical rigor. Few studies (38%) reported any information related to scale evaluation. Similar to Hinkin's (1995) conclusions from his review of scales in the management field, this study found scale development practices within the SRW domain to be inconsistent. The article reports detailed findings using Hinkin ‘s (1995) detailed methods and discusses practical implications for editors, reviewers and SRW researchers.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

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