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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2013

Michael Harvey, James B. Shaw, Ruth McPhail and Anthony Erickson

The purpose of the development of the paper was due to the seemingly endless searching for deans to replace the former dean of three to four years.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the development of the paper was due to the seemingly endless searching for deans to replace the former dean of three to four years.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper was developed around the present relevant secondary data.

Findings

The key findings of the paper were that deans were being replaced due to the difference in expectation of the various constituents (e.g. students, faculty, administration, parents) in the performance of the SBA.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations of the study were not providing primary data to support the theory based hypotheses of the study.

Practical implications

Deans need to recognize that there will be conflicting expectations relative to the performance of the dean and that deans have a very short time to effectuate change in academic organizations.

Social implications

Not having such high turnover in dean's positions should provide the stability of management to bring about change need in institutions of higher education.

Originality/value

Identification of key mistakes made by deans as well as the mistakes made by faculty undermine the performance of deans.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 24 May 2011

Howard Thomas and Lynne Thomas

This paper aims to focus on leadership in business schools. It seeks to advocate examining strategic leadership processes through the exploration of interactions between…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to focus on leadership in business schools. It seeks to advocate examining strategic leadership processes through the exploration of interactions between such multiple constituencies as the dean, faculty, university councils and advisory boards.

Design/methodology/approach

A range of models of the leadership process are identified and illustrated, namely, the strategic leadership process model, a model of leadership dynamics and an interactionist model, involving an examination of leadership characteristics, context and leadership style.

Findings

The current financial crisis and criticisms of the business school in the modern university require deans to address changing models and contingencies, globalisation and moral values in curriculum evaluation and leadership of the business school. The importance of further in‐depth case studies of strategic leadership is emphasised.

Originality/value

Three areas of important research are identified, namely, the skills of leadership characteristics, leadership styles and change and leadership training. It is concluded that leadership can be taught but must be reinforced with on‐the‐job experience.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 30 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 February 2014

Michael Preston-Shoot and Sally Cornish

The purpose of this paper is to report the findings from research into the outcomes of adult protection in Scotland, with particular focus on how service users, family…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report the findings from research into the outcomes of adult protection in Scotland, with particular focus on how service users, family members and service delivery professionals perceive the effectiveness of the protection orders in the Adult Support and Protection (Scotland) Act 2007.

Design/methodology/approach

The study comprised analysis of Adult Protection Committee biennial reports on implementation of the 2007 Act to the Scottish Government, key informant interviews and workshops with professionals involved in adult protection leadership and practice, and case study interviews with service users, family members and practitioners.

Findings

Concerns about the potential for paternalistic practice and excessive use of the protection orders within the 2007 Act have not materialised. The principle of proportionality appears to be firmly embedded in adult protection practice. Service delivery professionals, service users and family members remain acutely aware of the tensions between autonomy and protection but point to beneficial outcomes for adults at risk from the careful use of protection orders, especially banning orders.

Research limitations/implications

Only ten case studies were able to be included in the study. However, the use of mixed methods enabled triangulation of the findings. Common themes emerge from across the data sources. The findings also resonate with conclusions drawn by other researchers.

Practical implications

The paper identifies outcomes and challenges in respect of protecting adults at risk in Scotland. Strengths and limitations of the 2007 Act are identified.

Originality/value

The paper offers a formal evaluation of the outcome of protection orders for adults at risk in Scotland. The findings are of wider policy relevance given the debates on how to legislate for adult safeguarding in England and Wales.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

Richard Teare, Hadyn Ingram, Gordon Prestoungrange and Eric Sandelands

Contends that high performance in terms of managerial learning, attainment and return on investment in learning can be readily achieved using the process of action…

Abstract

Contends that high performance in terms of managerial learning, attainment and return on investment in learning can be readily achieved using the process of action learning. Profiles the contemporary origins of action learning and its application to business challenges and argues that it is the most appropriate learning approach for corporate business school/university structures. Suggests that to add value to the enterprise itself and to recognize the individual, companies should invest in their own accredited learning rather than sending high potential people away from the organization to study. Provides a case study illustration of how one UK hospitality firm secured a significant return on investment in learning during the early pilot work for IMCA Socrates – a corporate business school solution that offers an embedded system for accrediting learning at work.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 14 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 24 June 2020

George Okello Candiya Bongomin, Joseph Mpeera Ntayi and Charles Akol Malinga

The main purpose of this study is to establish the mediating effect of social network in the relationship between financial literacy and financial inclusion of the poor by

Abstract

Purpose

The main purpose of this study is to establish the mediating effect of social network in the relationship between financial literacy and financial inclusion of the poor by microfinance banks in developing countries.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted a cross-sectional research design and data were collected from the poor who resides in rural Uganda. Structural equation modelling (SEM) through analysis of moment structures (AMOS) was used to analyze the data. Bootstrap approach with 5,000 samples was run to establish the mediating effect of social network in the relationship between financial literacy and financial inclusion of the poor by microfinance banks in developing countries.

Findings

The results showed that social network significantly and positively mediate the relationship between financial literacy and financial inclusion of the poor by microfinance banks in developing countries. In addition, financial literacy also has a direct significant and positive effect on financial inclusion. Overall, the findings suggest that the presence of social network fully mediate the effect of financial literacy on financial inclusion of the poor by microfinance banks in developing countries.

Research limitations/implications

This study adopted a cross-sectional research design and data were collected using a semi-structured questionnaire. Future studies could adopt longitudinal research design to establish the dynamic characteristics of the samples under study over time. Besides, this study collected data from only poor households who were clients of microfinance banks located in rural Uganda. It ignored the other section of the population who were not the poor. Therefore, future studies could use the other section of the population who are clients of commercial banks.

Practical implications

The advocates of financial literacy and managers of microfinance banks in developing countries should ensure using existing local structures such as community and village associations to conduct financial literacy training. The village associations help in mobilizing members who are close-knit based on the existing societal ties that can be used as a channel for disseminating vital financial literacy information. Indeed, financial literacy workshops, seminars, and business clinics can be easily conducted to individuals who are members of the village associations.

Originality/value

This paper integrates social network theory in the relationship between financial literacy and financial inclusion of the poor by microfinance banks in developing countries. Social network acts as a conduit through which financial knowledge and skills flow to increase the scope of financial inclusion of the poor in developing countries.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 40 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 28 January 2020

Richard Haigh, Maheshika Menike Sakalasuriya, Dilanthi Amaratunga, Senaka Basnayake, Siri Hettige, Sarath Premalal and Ananda Jayasinghe Arachchi

The purpose of this paper is to deliver a detailed analysis of the functioning of upstream–downstream interface process of the tsunami early warning and mitigation system…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to deliver a detailed analysis of the functioning of upstream–downstream interface process of the tsunami early warning and mitigation system in Sri Lanka. It also gives an understanding of the social, administrative, political and cultural complexities attached to the operation of interface mechanism, and introduces an analytical framework highlighting the significant dynamics of the interface of tsunami early warning system in Sri Lanka.

Design/methodology/approach

Through the initial literature review, a conceptual framework was developed, highlighting the criteria against which the interface process can be assessed. This framework was used as the basis for developing data collection tools, namely, documentary analysis, semi-structured interviews and observations that focused on the key stakeholder institutions in Sri Lanka. Thematic analysis was used to analyze the data according to the conceptual framework, and an improved and detailed framework was developed deriving from the findings.

Findings

The manner in which the interface mechanism operates in Sri Lanka’s tsunami early warning system is discussed, providing a detailed understanding of the decision-making structures; key actors; standardisation; technical and human capacities; socio-spatial dynamics; coordination among actors; communication and information dissemination; and the evaluation processes. Several gaps and shortcomings were identified with relation to some of these aspects, and the significance of addressing these gaps is highlighted in the paper.

Practical implications

A number of recommendations are provided to address the existing shortcomings and to improve the overall performance of tsunami warning system in Sri Lanka.

Originality/value

Based on the findings, a framework was developed into a more detailed analytical framework that depicts the interface operationalisation in Sri Lanka, and can also be potentially applied to similar cases across the world. The new analytical framework was validated through a focus group discussion held in Sri Lanka with the participation of experts and practitioners.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

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Article
Publication date: 14 May 2018

George Okello Candiya Bongomin, John C. Munene, Joseph Mpeera Ntayi and Charles Akol Malinga

Drawing from the fact that institutions act as incentives and disincentives to human behaviour in financial markets, the purpose of this study is to examine the moderating…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing from the fact that institutions act as incentives and disincentives to human behaviour in financial markets, the purpose of this study is to examine the moderating role of institutional pillars in the relationship between financial intermediation and financial inclusion of the poor in rural Uganda.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used cross-sectional research design and data were collected from the poor residing in rural Uganda. Statistical package for social sciences was used to analyse the data. Descriptive statistics, correlations and regression analyses were generated. Besides, ModGraph excel programme was adopted to graphically explain the moderating role of institutional pillars in the relationship between financial intermediation and financial inclusion of the poor in rural Uganda.

Findings

The results revealed that institutional pillars of regulative (formal rules), normative (informal norms) and cultural cognitive (cognition) significantly moderate the relationship between financial intermediation and financial inclusion of the poor. Furthermore, the results also indicated that financial intermediation and institutional pillars have significant effects on financial inclusion of the poor in rural Uganda.

Research limitations/implications

The study focuses on only cross-sectional design, thus, leaving out longitudinal study. Future research using longitudinal data that explore behaviours of the poor over time could be useful. In addition, only quantitative data were used to measure variables under study and use of qualitative data were ignored. Thus, further studies using qualitative data are feasible.

Practical implications

Policymakers and advocates of financial inclusion in a developing country such as Uganda should adopt institutional pillars (regulative, normative and cultural-cognitive) in promoting financial intermediation in rural areas. The institutional pillars working in combination set the “rule of the game” or “humanly devise constraints” that guide economic exchange by promoting and limiting certain actions of actors in underdeveloped financial market as stipulated by North (1990) and Scott (1995).

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first attempt to examine the moderating role of institutional pillars under the theory of institutions in the relationship between financial intermediation and financial inclusion of the poor in a developing country setting. Indeed, institutions guide contract enforceability and information sharing in human interaction to lower transaction cost in the financial markets. This is missing in literature and theory of financial intermediation in promoting financial inclusion, especially in rural Uganda.

Details

International Journal of Ethics and Systems, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0828-8666

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Rachel Mindra and Musa Moya

The purpose of this paper is to examine the mediating effect of financial self-efficacy (FSE) on the relationship between financial attitude, financial literacy and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the mediating effect of financial self-efficacy (FSE) on the relationship between financial attitude, financial literacy and financial inclusion (FI) among individuals in Uganda.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a quantitative approach and cross-sectional research design, a sample of 400 individuals from urban Central and rural Northern Uganda was drawn. Using SPSS and AMOS™ 21, structural equation models and bootstrapping methods were used to establish the hypothesized relationships and mediation effects between financial attitude, financial literacy and FI.

Findings

The results suggested FSE as a mediator of the relationship between financial attitude, financial literacy and FI. Further, there was a significant and insignificant relationship between financial literacy, financial attitude and FI, respectively.

Research limitations/implications

The study was assessed using both potential and actual consumers of financial services collectively. However if separately assessed, possibly there would be a variation in perceptions or behavioural responses towards FI.

Practical implications

There is a need to develop and sustain high levels of financial confidence among individuals to enable them use formal financial services.

Social implications

Possession of financial knowledge, skills, an evaluative judgement with high levels of financial confidence enable individuals make financial decisions that improve their integration into the formal financial system and improved welfare.

Originality/value

The results contribute towards the limited empirical and theoretical evidence regarding the mediating role of FSE in explaining the financial behaviour.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1998

James I. Penrod and Ann F. Harbor

This paper focuses on a multi‐year effort to change the organizational culture of a very traditional IS unit into one that is “learning organization” and “client service”…

Abstract

This paper focuses on a multi‐year effort to change the organizational culture of a very traditional IS unit into one that is “learning organization” and “client service” oriented. It describes the steps taken in the first two years within the context of John Kotter’s “eight‐stage process of creating major change”. The paper sets forth the intent of each phase and the practical steps that have been taken to bring about the desired change. It approaches the process from the perspective of the CIO (the initiator of the process) with a practical appraisal of its success to date from the viewpoint of a long‐time university staff member.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2019

George Okello Candiya Bongomin and Joseph Ntayi

Recently, a large body of research has been devoted on the role of trust in shaping different types of transactions, especially in rural financial development. Trust is a…

Abstract

Purpose

Recently, a large body of research has been devoted on the role of trust in shaping different types of transactions, especially in rural financial development. Trust is a set of expectations shared by all those who engage in an exchange. Indeed, the “rule of the game” suggests that no trusting party in a transaction should act opportunistically. Consequently, this study aims to establish the mediating effect of trust in the relationship between mobile money adoption and usage and financial inclusion of MSMEs in developing countries with a specific focus on rural Uganda.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative survey-based study was used and responses obtained from 379 MSMEs located in northern Uganda were analysed using partial least square-PLS version 3.0. A semi-structured questionnaire was developed from scales and items used in previous studies referenced in internationally recognised journals to elicit responses from the MSMEs. Structural equation modelling was used to test the models to arrive at a final empirical model derived from the data.

Findings

The authors found evidence that trust enhances mobile money adoption and usage to increase the scope of financial inclusion of MSMEs in developing countries. Moreover, when individual effect was determined, trust also had significant and positive effect on financial inclusion. Thus, the study results imply that trust enhances mobile money adoption and usage to improve the level of financial inclusion of MSMEs in developing countries.

Research limitations/implications

The study used cross-sectional data to document the relationship between mobile money adoption and usage and financial inclusion and to establish the mediating effect of trust in the relationship. Future research could use relevant longitudinal data to verify other benefits of trust.

Practical implications

The results present trust as a significant factor for FINTECH financial services marketing and growth. Specifically, data privacy and effectiveness of the mobile telephone network is more likely to help consumers to bridge the gap between participation and non-participation on the mobile money platform. Customers’ data sent over the mobile network of providers should be protected from unnecessary access and usage by Mobile Network Operators (MNOs) staff and unauthorised persons and agents. Data protection protocols should be set by the MNOs to avoid unnecessary access and use of customers’ data.

Originality/value

Globally, Fintech scholars have examined the role of mobile money in promoting financial inclusion. However, there is insufficient evidence on the mediating effect of trust in the relationship between mobile money adoption and usage and financial inclusion, especially among rural MSMEs. This study invents a novel direction on the importance of trust in creating transaction efficiency by eliminating opportunism and fraud with in the Fintech ecosystem.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 16 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

Keywords

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