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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Lisa Rowe, David Perrin and Tony Wall

In 2014, the UK Government introduced a new form of apprenticeship, the Degree Apprenticeship, which extends across all undergraduate degree and master’s degree levels, maps to…

Abstract

Purpose

In 2014, the UK Government introduced a new form of apprenticeship, the Degree Apprenticeship, which extends across all undergraduate degree and master’s degree levels, maps to professional standards, and which is now embedded within governmental levies of large businesses. The purpose of this paper is to share early experiences of developing these Degree Apprenticeships, and consider the processes deployed to achieve it.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper combines desk research with reflections on the experience of developing the new Degree Apprenticeships within higher education institutes (HEIs) and considers the implications of this upon current and emerging HEI practice and research.

Findings

There were a number of key resources which facilitated the approval of the Degree Apprenticeship, and these included a pre-existing, flexible work-based learning framework, the associated mechanisms of accreditation, existing professional networks, and a professionally oriented interface between the university, employer and professional body.

Research limitations/implications

As the context is currently at the early stages of implementation, and the policy context is rapidly changing in the context of Brexit, so too will the related scholarship. This means factors others than those highlighted within this paper may emerge over the coming year or two.

Practical implications

There are a number of practical implications for the development of Degree Apprenticeships from this research that are reflected in the findings, and include the development of flexible and collaborative processes, resources and networks.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the first published accounts of the development of a Degree Apprenticeship within the new policy context in the UK.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 September 2019

Jon Talbot, David Perrin and Bob Meakin

The purpose of this paper is to identify potential reasons for the success of an innovative work-based learning (WBL) shell framework in an adverse environment.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify potential reasons for the success of an innovative work-based learning (WBL) shell framework in an adverse environment.

Design/methodology/approach

Case study is the experience of one programme.

Findings

Demand-led, flexible WBL programmes have to overcome a number of internal cultural and institutional barriers in order to succeed. Important requirements are likely to include effective leadership, financial viability, adherence to quality assurance, adaptability, entrepreneurialism and a cohesive community of practice incorporating these traits.

Research limitations/implications

The conclusions are drawn from shared experience and are suggestive only as they are not readily susceptible to empirical verification. The authors accept that the conclusions appear speculative for some, but they suggest that in order for innovative programmes to survive, more is required than sound pedagogy.

Practical implications

Although lessons may not be directly transferable, the paper draws attention to the importance of managerial, leadership and organisational factors necessary for innovative WBL programmes to survive and develop.

Originality/value

There is some literature on why some innovative higher education programmes and institutions have failed; however, there is little on why some programmes are successful.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 4 December 2017

Lisa Rowe, Daniel Moss, Neil Moore and David Perrin

The purpose of this paper is to explore the issues and challenges facing employers as they manage degree apprentices in the workplace. It examines the relationship between…

12599

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the issues and challenges facing employers as they manage degree apprentices in the workplace. It examines the relationship between managers and apprentices undertaking a work-based degree. This research is of particular relevance at this time because of the UK Government’s initiative to expand the number of apprenticeships in the workplace to three million new starts by 2020, inevitably bringing a range of pressures to bear on employers (BIS, 2015). The purpose is to share early experiences of employer management of degree apprenticeships, and provide a range of recommendations to develop and improve employer and higher education institution (HEI) practice.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper combines desk research with qualitative data drawn from interviews with a range of cross-sector organisations to investigate the employer’s experience of developing the new degree apprenticeships. Data are explored inductively using thematic analysis in order to surface dominant patterns and considers the implications of findings upon current and emerging HEI and employer practice and research.

Findings

There were a number of key themes which emerged from the data collected. These included the need for effective, employer-led recruitment processes, careful management of expectations, sound HEI retention strategies, employer involvement and board-level motivators to ensure organisational benefits are derived from effectively situated workplace learning and a focus upon effective, empowering mentoring and support strategies.

Research limitations/implications

As degree apprenticeship standards and programmes are currently at the early stages of implementation, and opportunities, funding and resourcing are rapidly changing in the context of government policy, so too will employer appetite and strategies for supporting degree apprentices, along with apprentice behaviour. This means that additional findings, beyond those highlighted within this paper, may emerge in the near future.

Practical implications

There are a number of practical implications supporting managerial development and support of degree apprentices in the workplace from this research. These are reflected in the findings, and include the development of flexible and collaborative processes, resources, mentor training and networks.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the first published accounts of the employers’ perspective of managing a degree apprenticeship within the new policy context in the UK. As a result, the work offers a unique insight into the emerging challenges and issues encountered by managers working with degree apprentices in the twenty-first century business environment.

Details

Journal of Work-Applied Management, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2205-2062

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 October 2011

David Major, Denise Meakin and David Perrin

The purpose of this paper is to inform colleagues working in the field of work‐based learning (WBL) about the development of a Post Graduate Certificate in Work Based Learning…

815

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to inform colleagues working in the field of work‐based learning (WBL) about the development of a Post Graduate Certificate in Work Based Learning Facilitation at the University of Chester.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach is to describe and comment on the Post Graduate Certificate and to provide comment on the context within which it originated and the rationale for it.

Findings

Not applicable other than in the sense that this programme has now been delivered successfully to a number of cohorts.

Practical implications

This is a model for others to consider and an offer to assist others who may be interested in building their capacity to deliver programmes of WBL.

Originality/value

The university believes that, at the time of its development, there was no similar provision available. It is a model that has proved of value in terms of supporting the quality of the university's WBL provision.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 9 November 2015

Tony Wall

696

Abstract

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2014

Jonathan Talbot, David Perrin and Denise Meakin

The purpose of the paper is to contribute to the debate on the maintenance and enhancement of quality in the emerging landscape of higher education practice and delivery where new…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to contribute to the debate on the maintenance and enhancement of quality in the emerging landscape of higher education practice and delivery where new kinds of institutional relationships are emerging. Much of the literature describes situations where the risk to quality assurance is relatively low. The example discussed here details how principles of risk management can be used to assure quality where the risk of reputational damage is far greater.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses a single case study approach.

Findings

New and flexible forms of delivery in higher education present opportunities but also the potential for reputational damage so innovative delivery must be matched by a corresponding commitment to quality. This must be embedded at all levels, including tutors. Much of the literature from the perspective of tutors emphasises their experience of quality as a matter of bureaucratic compliance. The case study illustrates that in circumstances where there is a risk of compromise academic tutors can actively engage with a quality enhancement process.

Research limitations/implications

Although a case study of specialised practice there is evidence that increasing numbers of universities are seeking to engage in similar methods. The literature on the implications of these initiatives is comprised of case studies so there is a need for more systematic research which examines practices more broadly. The case study also suggests that the search for quality cultures in HE may fruitfully investigate circumstances where quality has to be fought for rather than assumed.

Practical implications

The paper demonstrates that universities can deliver in flexible and innovative ways which do not compromise their reputation provided they risk assess the implications of each arrangement and develop appropriate procedures and practices at all levels of operation.

Originality/value

The case study is not the first of its kind to be published but it is the first to be published in the context of the quality assurance literature rather than the more specialist work based learning literature. It links developments within that specialist field to more mainstream discourses in the quality assurance literature. It also draws attention of a wider audience to some of the more innovative developments in British HE practice.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 June 2007

George Woodman

92

Abstract

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2014

John Dalrymple

86

Abstract

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Book part
Publication date: 16 May 2017

Lubna Asrar Siddiqi, Helen Chick and Mark Dibben

With increasing ethical issues and global corporate scandals, many organisations are now looking to employ well-rounded professionals, who take ownership of their workplace while…

Abstract

With increasing ethical issues and global corporate scandals, many organisations are now looking to employ well-rounded professionals, who take ownership of their workplace while leading with their heart and soul. These organisations seem to be more concerned with relationship building and future employability (Cunha, Rego, & D’Oliveira, 2006) and are interested in the concept of spirituality with the hope that it could address ethical issues influencing their businesses.

‘Spirituality and ethics are core values that have shaped human life from time immemorial’ (Mahadevan, 2013, p. 91). Ethics and spirituality are interrelated but different as ethics is about customs and habits, while spirituality is concerned with personal meaningful experiences and differs from person to person, making it hard to define.

Organisations moving towards spirituality require leadership that can develop a spiritual climate and their learning and development has to be top priority (Pawar, 2009).

This requires management education to appreciate the concept of spirituality and like some universities globally, incorporate it within their programmes (Harris & Crossman, 2005).

To explore whether spirituality could be incorporated within the higher education curriculum, my PhD researched academic’s viewpoints in selected faculties within a regional university in Australia. This paper reports some of its findings from the data gathered through semi-structured interviews, with a focus on leadership, its relevance to ethics and the teaching of spirituality. Results indicate that academics support the inclusion of spirituality but the programmes need to be carefully designed.

Details

Responsible Leadership and Ethical Decision-Making
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-416-3

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 August 2020

James Welch

The purpose of this article is examine some of the most successful contemporary global business leaders in relation to undergraduate institution and undergraduate major in order…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is examine some of the most successful contemporary global business leaders in relation to undergraduate institution and undergraduate major in order to examine the value and return of higher education programs for global business leadership. This is an important topic in the modern global context, as there continues to be an increasing global push toward deemphasizing and defunding liberal arts education in favor of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) fields for college and university students around the globe.

Design/methodology/approach

The educational backgrounds of the 2019 Fortune 50 CEOs were researched in relation to undergraduate institutions attended and undergraduate majors. The study also included an examination of graduate education, if applicable. Using available biographical information regarding the CEOs educational backgrounds, these business leaders were compared relative to the educational data.

Findings

An examination of the undergraduate educational backgrounds of the 2019 Fortune 50 CEOs revealed an exact split between 18 STEM majors, 18 liberal arts majors and 18 business majors, with 1 CEO who began university studies but did not graduate. Upon examination, it is also apparent that some majors were more directly related to a CEO's industry, while other majors ended up having little relation to the CEO's chosen career path.

Practical implications

The results of this study contribute to the very important discussion concerning the long-term value of a college education. At both micro and macro levels, stakeholders are constantly questioning the ultimate return on investment of a college education, and examination of the 2019 Fortune 50 CEOs indicates that the choice of college major is only one ingredient in the overall recipe for professional success. For these business leaders, there were a wide variety of educational paths, in terms of college academic preparations, that eventually led to the very pinnacle of professional and leadership attainment.

Originality/value

This study demonstrates that a particular undergraduate field of study is not going to make or break a career, and the examination of these Fortune 50 CEOs indicates that one's ultimate career achievement is not simply relegated to the specific field of undergraduate major.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

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