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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1994

Paul G Ranky

Summarizes the most important principles of concurrent engineering[CE] and computer integrated manufacturing [CIM].Discusses system data flow and IDEFo diagrams used as…

Abstract

Summarizes the most important principles of concurrent engineering [CE] and computer integrated manufacturing [CIM]. Discusses system data flow and IDEFo diagrams used as graphical descriptions of the engineering process. Introduces a software package called CIMpgr. Concludes that CIM addresses the total information requirements and management of a company from the development of a business plan through to the shipment of a product and the follow‐up support.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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Article
Publication date: 27 May 2014

Christopher Durugbo

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the benefits of using the business network channel (Bunch) approach for modelling business networks and studying the business…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the benefits of using the business network channel (Bunch) approach for modelling business networks and studying the business network evolution. Business network models put the structures of process models into context by visualising roles and communication channels for social interactions.

Design/methodology/approach

The research applies a case study-based approach involving the creation of business network visualisations to capture snapshots of an industrial firm's business network over a three-year period. A questionnaire-based study was also conducted with 18 key informants to evaluate the Bunch approach against existing business network modelling techniques.

Findings

This study shows that when business networks – as opposed to business processes – are diagrammatically modelled, patterns of relations between individuals can also be visualised and factored into how information systems are (re)designed and deployed. The study also finds that as business networks evolve, the ability to offer complementary channels of communication and coordinate business/technological information is vital to how upturns in process times improves overall business effectiveness and efficiency.

Originality/value

The major contribution of this paper is an exposition on how the Bunch approach could serve as a pedagogical tool for gaining clarity on their roles and links within the business and as an analytical tool for studying the evolution of business networks in relation to roles, links, information technologies, business strategies and business network anomalies.

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Tak Man Woo and Hang Wai Law

This paper addressed an object‐oriented modeling of the quality control information system (QCIS) and its implementation for small‐medium sized enterprises (SMEs). The…

Abstract

This paper addressed an object‐oriented modeling of the quality control information system (QCIS) and its implementation for small‐medium sized enterprises (SMEs). The major idea is to convert the data structure, system behavior and computational aspect of the QCIS into models: object, dynamic and functional models using the object‐oriented modeling technique in a user‐friendly and economical way. Then, based on an SME environment, the paper expounds the methodology by implementing the models into a computerized QCIS. The system is expected to be affordable and self‐developed by most SMEs. The system can manipulate quality data dynamically to keep the quality control information up to date. It can guarantee different types of charts, lists and reports in the support of quick quality decision making with minimal human efforts.

Details

Integrated Manufacturing Systems, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6061

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1990

UMIT S. BITITCI and ALLAN S. CARRIE

During recent years integration has been the key issue for many manufacturing organisations. The authors review recent developments and ongoing research work and propose a…

Abstract

During recent years integration has been the key issue for many manufacturing organisations. The authors review recent developments and ongoing research work and propose a methodology based on existing tools and techniques which would allow integration of the material flow system with the supporting information system.

Details

Logistics Information Management, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6053

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Article
Publication date: 24 July 2009

Lars Bækgaard

The purpose of the paper is to obtain insight into, and provide practical advice for, event‐based conceptual modeling.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to obtain insight into, and provide practical advice for, event‐based conceptual modeling.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper analyzes a set of event concepts and uses the results to formulate a conceptual event model that is used to identify guidelines for creation of dynamic process models and static information models.

Findings

The paper characterizes events as short‐duration processes that have participants, consequences, and properties, and that may be modeled in terms of information structures. The conceptual event model is used to characterize a variety of event concepts and it is used to illustrate how events can be used to integrate dynamic modeling of processes and static modeling of information structures.

Originality/value

The results are unique in the sense that no other general event concept has been used to unify a similar broad variety of seemingly incompatible event concepts. The general event concept can be used to improve dynamic and static modeling.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

Bradley Hull

An effective supply chain requires a smoothly operating information system. Accurate information must flow among the links in a timely, coordinated fashion, which…

Abstract

An effective supply chain requires a smoothly operating information system. Accurate information must flow among the links in a timely, coordinated fashion, which minimizes distortion. The system must incorporate supply‐and‐demand information, and constantly changing information about real world events that affect the chain. This paper provides a structure for these flows through a data flow diagram (DFD) and with a case study of its application to the Alaskan North Slope Oil (ANS) supply chain. The properties of this DFD are presented for push, pull and hybrid push/pull supply chains. Management can use the DFD approach to improve supply‐chain operations. Information flows can be rationalized and streamlined and feedback loops can be defined to measure performance. IT professionals can apply the generic nature of the DFD to a wide variety of logistics activities, including warehouse and carrier operations.

Details

Logistics Information Management, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6053

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Article
Publication date: 27 September 2011

Heap Yih Chong, Balakrishnan Balamuralithara and Siong Choy Chong

The purpose of this paper is to propose a conceptual model which is aimed at assisting end‐users, i.e. construction practitioners who are without a proper legal background…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a conceptual model which is aimed at assisting end‐users, i.e. construction practitioners who are without a proper legal background for effective administration of construction contracts, to enable them to make correct interpretations and decisions in dealing with vast amount of legal information.

Design/methodology/approach

This study proposes the application of data warehouse technology in the contract administration process of the construction industry. Upon identification of a comprehensive list of problems associated with construction contracts based on the feedback from 12 reputed experts in the construction industry, a conceptual model is developed using data flow diagram.

Findings

The results show that data warehouse technology is feasible and practical to the construction practitioners in the contract administration process.

Research limitations/implications

This research focuses only on the development of a conceptual model and thus the practicability aspect of the model is a major concern. As such, the resulting practical implications are limited and are constrained only to the construction industry in Malaysia, raising the question of generalizability of the proposed model, as well as across different industries and countries.

Practical implications

It is posited that the proposed conceptual model, when implemented, would enable construction practitioners to administer construction contracts with better clarity and accuracy, so that interpretation errors and disputes can be mitigated. This will facilitate the development of harmonious working relationships.

Originality/value

The application of data warehouse technology in contract administration is rather new in the construction industry. The conceptual model thus offers a more effective and proactive approach in construction contract administration towards dispute resolution and/or prevention.

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1997

K. Vinodrai Pandya, Andreas Karlsson, Stefano Sega and A. Carrie

Presents a table comparing business process for the future manufacturing enterprises with a set of mapping techniques and methodologies. The first section is a brief…

Abstract

Presents a table comparing business process for the future manufacturing enterprises with a set of mapping techniques and methodologies. The first section is a brief introduction about the current situation for many European manufacturing companies. After that, describes the process‐based organization and a set of generic processes. Presents two key processes which were identified for each of five enterprises of the future suggested by Puttick. Following this, gives a description of the most common techniques and methodologies currently used, together with an evaluation of them. The table obtained by matching the processes with the techniques can be used as a guide when choosing the most suitable mapping technique or methodology for a enterprise’s key processes.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 17 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2005

Bruce C. Hungerford and Michael A. Eierman

The Unified Modeling Language has become an alternative to traditional modeling languages such as data flow diagrams for use in systems analysis. A modeling language is…

Abstract

The Unified Modeling Language has become an alternative to traditional modeling languages such as data flow diagrams for use in systems analysis. A modeling language is used to represent an information system so that analysts can use the model to make decisions about the design of the system and to communicate with stakeholders about the system. This study examines the comparative effectiveness of the UML and traditional modeling languages in communicating information about a system design. The study examines this on three types of individuals: individuals with no knowledge of either modeling language, individuals with no knowledge of either language that were provided training in one of the languages, and individuals that have had more extensive training in one of the languages. The study finds that there is no difference in the ability to communicate system design information between the languages for the first two types of individuals. However, the study finds that, for more extensively trained individuals, systems modeled with the UML are better able to communicate information about the data in the system while systems modeled with traditional languages are better able to communicate information about the process used by the system.

Details

American Journal of Business, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1935-5181

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

C.K.M. Lee, H.C.W. Lau and K.M. Yu

The purpose of this research is to study how knowledge‐based systems are applied in an industrial environment. This paper attempts to propose a system, object‐based…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to study how knowledge‐based systems are applied in an industrial environment. This paper attempts to propose a system, object‐based knowledge integration system (OBKIS) which supports the early stages of product development.

Design/methodology/approach

This proposed system characterizes the “dynamic” information exchange capability through its distinct features to include executable tasks within product information script that is being utilized in various functional groups, thereby introducing the action items to be carried out in relevant areas. To achieve the “dynamic” information exchange capability, object technology, which is favorable to the creation of inter‐related modularized data objects, is incorporated into the product information script to facilitate the active information interchange process. The universal extensible markup language (XML) is also adopted to facilitate data exchange between the database and the knowledge base in order to make real time data and knowledge available throughout the enterprise.

Findings

Further research on developing the well‐structured XML schema is needed in order to provide a well‐understood syntax and self‐defined mark‐up language to suit particular needs of product data exchange. For verification and measurement, it is suggested that one should evaluate the system in terms of data reliability, transformation accuracy and effectiveness for improving product design process.

Practical implications

The implications of these for information flows and management of product data during product development are discussed. In order to validate the feasibility of the proposed system, a prototype is developed for a local company so as to provide linking between the system design concept and system implementation in a practical environment.

Originality/value

The significance of this research is that a new product data schema for the initial phase of product development is formulated and the proposed system supports invoking various behaviors for the same message and overriding the pre‐defined inherited operation such that a flexible correlation can be formulated in the iterative product design process.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

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