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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1996

Daniel R. Sabia

Discussions of political ethics, and of the problem of dirty hands, often cite Max Weber’s comments on these subjects, especially as presented in “Politics as a vocation”…

Abstract

Discussions of political ethics, and of the problem of dirty hands, often cite Max Weber’s comments on these subjects, especially as presented in “Politics as a vocation”. Offers an interpretation of Weber’s views by explaining why he focused on the political leader as the proper subject of political morality, why he deemed certain personal qualities essential to responsible leadership, how he conceived the relationship between ethics and politics, and why he believed the problem of dirty hands to be both inescapable and unresolvable. Advances the central claims that Weber conceived political ethics as the attempt to reconcile ethical with political duties, and dirty hands as the inevitable accompaniment of political action because of its unavoidable association with violence and the partiality of its ends.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-252X

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Article
Publication date: 25 July 2019

Alison Preston, Elisa Birch and Andrew R. Timming

The purpose of this paper is to document the wage effects associated with sexual orientation and to examine whether the wage gap has improved following recent…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to document the wage effects associated with sexual orientation and to examine whether the wage gap has improved following recent institutional changes which favour sexual minorities.

Design/methodology/approach

Ordinary least squares and quantile regressions are estimated using Australian data for 2010–2012 and 2015–2017, with the analysis disaggregated by sector of employment. Blinder–Oaxaca decompositions are used to quantify unexplained wage gaps.

Findings

Relative to heterosexual men, in 2015–2017 gay men in the public and private sectors had wages which were equivalent to heterosexual men at all points in the wage distribution. In the private sector: highly skilled lesbians experienced a wage penalty of 13 per cent; low-skilled bisexual women faced a penalty of 11 per cent, as did bisexual men at the median (8 per cent penalty). In the public sector low-skilled lesbians and low-skilled bisexual women significant experienced wage premiums. Between 2010–2012 and 2015–2017 the pay position of highly skilled gay men has significantly improved with the convergence driven by favourable wage (rather than composition) effects.

Practical implications

The results provide important benchmarks against which the treatment of sexual minorities may be monitored.

Originality/value

The analysis of the sexual minority wage gaps by sector and position on the wage distribution and insight into the effect of institutions on the wages of sexual minorities.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 41 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 16 July 2019

Michael E. Martell

The purpose of this paper is to observe how the cohabiting lesbian earnings differential in the USA has changed since the early 2000s, a time period during which the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to observe how the cohabiting lesbian earnings differential in the USA has changed since the early 2000s, a time period during which the lesbian, gay and bisexual rights movement has been very successful.

Design/methodology/approach

The author analyzes the 2012–2017 American Community Survey using Mincer-style income regressions.

Findings

The author finds that cohabiting lesbians earn approximately 11 percent less than married heterosexual women. The earnings penalty has emerged as a result of the disproportionately large penalty young lesbians’ experience. While older lesbians (over 45) do not experience an earnings penalty, younger lesbians appear doubly disadvantaged. They now face a lesbian wage gap of approximately 24 percent in addition to the previously documented gender wage gap.

Research limitations/implications

The paper shows that cohabiting lesbians earn approximately 11 percent less than married heterosexual women. The earnings penalty has emerged as a result of the disproportionately large penalty young cohabiting lesbians experience. While older cohabiting lesbians (over 45) do not experience an earnings penalty, younger cohabiting lesbians face a wage gap of approximately 24 percent.

Originality/value

The study finds, contrary to most previous research, a cohabiting lesbian earnings penalty instead of premium. The findings highlight that there is considerable heterogeneity in the economic experience of cohabiting lesbians, and that young cohabiting lesbians comprise a particularly vulnerable population.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 41 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Book part
Publication date: 16 November 2020

Luiza Morena Alves Lopes

Since the late 1980s, the Brazilian Psychiatric Reform, alongside the anti-asylum movement, has promoted a change in the way of treating people with mental suffering in…

Abstract

Since the late 1980s, the Brazilian Psychiatric Reform, alongside the anti-asylum movement, has promoted a change in the way of treating people with mental suffering in the country. This process produced transformations in the flows and forms in which individuals with mental illnesses use the city, intending to make the city itself less unequal.

Taking into account that accessibility measures must consider individual, temporal, transportation and land-use elements as relevant, this study will focus on the relation between mobility and access, looking at subjects who were submitted to prolonged psychiatric hospitalisation and got discharged to live in the Residential Therapeutic Services – RTS, in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. In order to do that, the study used focus groups, observation, shadowing and in-depth interviews as methodologies strategies.

The results of the study demonstrate that: (a) there are a variety of ways of accessing the city; (b) displacements outside the facilities are characterised by the proximity of the destinations and by being made, mostly, on foot; (c) there is a restriction regarding the use of public transport system; and (d) access to money is a determinant factor for the accomplishment of mobility practices in city spaces. However, it is also observed that the mobility and access to the city can exert an effect of autonomy by allowing governance of the subjects’ own time and destination.

Details

Urban Mobility and Social Equity in Latin America: Evidence, Concepts, Methods
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-009-7

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Article
Publication date: 4 December 2017

Rachel Sayers, John Levendis and Mehmet Dicle

The purpose of this paper is to determine the nature of the wage gap between genders and sexual orientation.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the nature of the wage gap between genders and sexual orientation.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses OLS on pooled repeated cross-sections.

Findings

The differences in wages between gay/straight men and women mirror what would be expected from labor force attachment more so than direct heterosexism.

Research limitations/implications

The authors use a functional definition of sexual preference that reflects whether the respondent had sex with someone of the same gender in the same year. It does not ask whether the person identifies publicly as gay/lesbian/bisexual.

Originality/value

The authors verify and extend earlier findings on the sexual orientation and gendered wage gap.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 44 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

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