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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Ishmael Owiredu, Damian Laryea and John Barimah

– The aim of this paper is to promote the utilization and diversification of cashew nuts through its use as a substitute for wheat flour in biscuit production.

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Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to promote the utilization and diversification of cashew nuts through its use as a substitute for wheat flour in biscuit production.

Design/methodology/approach

Wheat flour was substituted with cashew nut flour (CNF) at levels of 0, 20, 30 and 40 percent in the production of biscuit. The products obtained were subjected to proximate, mineral and sensory analysis.

Findings

There was a significant increase in protein and fat contents from 7.75 and 22.11 percent to 12.89 and 32.11 percent, respectively, when CNF increased, whiles carbohydrate decreased from 66.67 to 48.04 percent. A significant increase in magnesium (27.93-97.03 mg/100 g), sodium (198.11-228.02 mg/100 g), phosphorus (55.90-149.00 mg/100 g), potassium (290.40-990.00 mg/100 g), zinc (0.72-2.00 mg/100 g) and iron (0.28-1.00 mg/100 g) was also observed as CNF increased. Sensory analysis revealed that there was no significant difference (p>0.05) between the 20 and 30 percent substituted samples, in terms of overall acceptability. Therefore, wheat flour could be substituted with CNF up to 30 percent in the production of biscuit.

Originality/value

This study was done to ascertain the potential use of CNF as a substitute for wheat flour and a nutrient enrichment in biscuit production, in order to diversify its use; since it still remains an underutilized raw material in Ghana.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 44 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Damian Laryea, Esther Yeboah Akoto, Ibok Oduro and William Ofori Appaw

The purpose of this study is to identify the various traditional foods available in two towns in Ghana and to assess consumer perception about these traditional foods. Traditional…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to identify the various traditional foods available in two towns in Ghana and to assess consumer perception about these traditional foods. Traditional foods provide nutritional and health benefits, but their consumption keeps declining, such that some are becoming extinct.

Design/methodology/approach

The level of knowledge of consumers and their attitude toward the consumption of traditional foods were determined. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in Sekondi and four areas in Kumasi, with a sample size of 200 in each of the two towns. The data obtained were analyzed using Pearson correlation and Chi-square test for independence.

Findings

While consumers had very good general knowledge of the traditional foods, most of them had little knowledge on nutrient compositions of the foods. About 95.5 per cent of respondents in Sekondi consumed traditional foods relative to those in Kumasi (62.5 per cent). There was no linear relationship existing between respondents’ knowledge, attitude and consumption of traditional foods (r < 0.50). More so, respondents’ attitude, knowledge and consumption of traditional foods, mostly, did not depend on the demographic factors (age and education). Other factors such as convenience, economic status of respondents and safety of traditional foods may be contributory factors to the low patronage and consumption of traditional foods.

Originality/value

Most researches on traditional foods in Ghana have mostly focused on food ingredients; therefore, there is little or no available information on consumer perception of prepared traditional foods. Because consumer opinions change over time, there is a need to consistently gather data to help food industries and food service operators meet consumer needs and expectations.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 46 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2013

Esther Gyedu‐Akoto and Damian Laryea

The aim of this paper is to promote the local consumption of cassava through its utilization in baked products such as cocoa powder‐based biscuits.

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Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to promote the local consumption of cassava through its utilization in baked products such as cocoa powder‐based biscuits.

Design/methodology/approach

Wheat flour was substituted with cassava flour at different levels – 0, 20, 40, 60, 80 and 100 percent in the production of cocoa powder‐based biscuits. The products obtained were analyzed for protein and ash contents. Sensory analysis was also conducted on the products to determine the optimum level of inclusion of cassava flour.

Findings

The incremental addition of cassava flour to the biscuits reduced the sensory and chemical quality of the products. The use of sole cassava flour (100 percent) could not form dough to produce biscuits. However, biscuits with 20 percent cassava flour were found to be most acceptable. Regression analysis of the data showed that the quality of the products depended on their texture and protein content since these attributes had R2 values higher than 0.80.

Originality/value

This study was done to determine the potential use of cassava flour in baked products to meet the needs of the dynamic consumer market and also help in the reduction of excess cassava on the Ghanaian market.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 43 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 November 2015

John Barimah, Damian Laryea and Ugett Naa Korkoi Okine

– This paper aims to assess the potential of date fruit powder as a refined sugar replacer in rock buns to help promote and diversify the utilization of date fruit.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to assess the potential of date fruit powder as a refined sugar replacer in rock buns to help promote and diversify the utilization of date fruit.

Design/methodology/approach

Date fruit pulp was sun dried, milled into powder, sieved and its proximate composition determined. Refined sugar in rock buns was replaced with date fruit powder at 0, 50, 80 and 100 per cent levels. The samples were then subjected to proximate, mineral and sensory evaluation.

Findings

Date fruit powder had 1.47 per cent crude fiber and was high in carbohydrate (82.15 per cent). Carbohydrate content of samples decreased (48.55-29.72 per cent), while crude protein (6.78-9.97 per cent), crude fat (22.74-33.66 per cent) and crude fiber (0-0.49 per cent) contents increased with an increasing substitution of date powder. Of all, 0 and 50 per cent substituted rock bun samples were the most preferred. Date powder significantly (p < 0.05) increased the potassium (0.55-1.57 per cent), calcium (0.08-1.08 per cent) and iron (0.53-0.625 per cent) contents of the samples.

Originality/value

This research assessed the potential of date fruit powder as a replacer of refined sugar in rock buns, as it remains an underutilized commodity in Ghana. Replacing 50 per cent of refined sugar improved the nutrient composition of rock buns, thereby making date fruit powder a nutritious sugar replacer which could be used in pastry products. This when adopted would diversify the utilization of date fruits while providing good nutrition to consumers.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 45 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 March 2018

Neema Kavishe, Ian Jefferson and Nicholas Chileshe

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to identify and rank the challenges influencing the delivery of the housing public-private partnership (HPPP) in Tanzania; and second…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to identify and rank the challenges influencing the delivery of the housing public-private partnership (HPPP) in Tanzania; and second, to suggest solutions in the form of a conceptual public-private partnership (PPP) framework model that will address the identified challenges and boost the chances of success.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a convergent parallel (concurrent) mixed method approach, data were collected from 28 stakeholders involved with HPPP projects in Tanzania using a hand-delivered and e-mail survey and 13 semi-structured interviews with public and private sector respondents. The quantitative data included subjecting the 19 challenges as identified from the literature to parametric tests such as one-sample t-tests and descriptive statistics tests such as measures of central tendencies and frequency analysis through Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS 22.0). Qualitative data employed content analysis. The research was further underpinned by a number of theoretical perspectives such as Gidden’s structuration theory, contingency theory, relational and equity theory.

Findings

The top five ranked challenges influencing the delivery of HPPP were “inadequate PPP skills and knowledge”; “poor contracting and tendering documents”; “inadequate project management”; “inadequate legal framework”; and “misinformation on financial capacity of private partners”. The least six ranked and most significant challenges based on the one-sample (single) t-tests were as follows: “Poor risk allocation”; “inexperienced private partner”; “unequal qualification and contributions of expertise”; “poor enabling environment to attract competent partners”; “inadequate mechanisms for recovery of private investors’ capital”; and “high costs in procuring PPP projects”. The qualitative study further confirmed the challenges and cited the reason for the failure of joint venture projects as the lack of motivation for undertaking similar PPP projects. Despite the increased awareness of PPP projects and associated marginal benefits, the main impediment to the uptake and delivery of PPP housing projects remained the lack of skills and expertise.

Research limitations/implications

The proposed framework model is not yet tested, but since this paper is part of the ongoing research, the next stage involves the testing and validation of the model. Future studies could test the applicability of the proposed framework in other HPPP projects in Tanzania, and in other similar developing countries. Second, the validated framework can contribute towards addressing similar challenges as well as providing guidance. The proposed framework model is not yet tested, but since this paper is part of the ongoing research, the next stage involves the testing and validation of the model. Furthermore, recommendation for future research is to test the alignment of the identified challenges to the proposed remedial solutions across the five phases within the proposed PPP framework with a number of case studies.

Practical implications

The identified challenges were used to form the basis of the framework presented in this paper. Furthermore, these provide useful information, thus leading to increased awareness to enable successful delivery of HPPP in Tanzania. Similarly, both the government and policy makers could use the findings as the basis for re-examining the existing PPP policy and regulations, and reflecting on the existing situation with a view to improving the delivery of future HPPP projects.

Originality/value

The empirical study is among the first that identifies and ranks the challenges of PPP for housing projects delivery within the Tanzanian context. The identification of the challenges enabled their ranking, resulting in the mapping out of the most critical challenges. Furthermore, using the Gidden’s structuration theory, the study illustrates how institution mechanisms (structures) address these delivery challenges, thus influencing the implementation of HPPP in Tanzania, and how individual stakeholders (human agents or agency) are able to make choices (advocated solutions) in dealing with the challenges. More so, these constraints (challenges) as identified and viewed through the contingency and equity theoretical lenses form the foundation for developing the PPP conceptual framework. The proposed framework would thus serve as a mechanism for providing practical solutions as well as reducing the level of severity of the identified challenges.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 September 2015

Tan Phat Nguyen and Nicholas Chileshe

The Vietnam construction industry has considerably developed since 1986 as a result of “Doi Moi” or all-round renovation process. However, despite the pace of economic reforms, a…

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Abstract

Purpose

The Vietnam construction industry has considerably developed since 1986 as a result of “Doi Moi” or all-round renovation process. However, despite the pace of economic reforms, a number of challenges continue to plague the construction industry. The purpose of this paper is to revisit the factors causing construction project failure in Vietnam. Some of the selected best practices from Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa (BRICS) and China, Indonesia, Vietnam, Egypt, Turkey, South Africa (CIVETS) are discussed.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a mixed method approach, data were collected from construction stakeholders in Vietnam using a postal survey questionnaire and semi-structured interviews. The quantitative data were subjected to descriptive statistics using ranking and frequencies analysis, and qualitative data employed content analysis.

Findings

Despite the lack of systematic approach to managing projects risks, there is a high level of acknowledgement regarding the importance of risk management practices. The highly ranked critical factors still causing construction project failure in Vietnam are: disregard of the significance of project planning process and project planning; lack of experience in executing complicated project; poor design capacity and frequent design changes; lack of knowledge and ability in managing construction projects; lack of financial capacity of owner; poor performance of contractors; lack of a systematic approach to managing the project and entire organisation; corruption and bribery in construction projects; the delays in payment; and economic volatility and high inflation.

Practical implications

The identified and revisited project failure factors could be used as a “road map” for the revaluation, and development of appropriate project management practices.

Originality/value

The construction sector has undergone through significant structural changes following “Doi Moi”. This study provides the opportunity to realign the strategies for addressing project failure factors and learning from comparative studies in BRICS and CIVETS countries.

Details

Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

Keywords

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