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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

Dale Poulter

149

Abstract

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Internet Research, vol. 8 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

Dale Poulter

128

Abstract

Details

Internet Research, vol. 8 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 August 1998

Dale Poulter

99

Abstract

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Internet Research, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 October 1998

Dale Poulter

129

Abstract

Details

Internet Research, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

Abstract

Details

The Emerald Handbook of Multi-Stakeholder Communication
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-898-2

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1906

WHEN the open access method of lending books was first introduced on safe‐guarded lines at Clerkenwell, over twelve years ago, a considerable amount of dolorous prophecy was set…

Abstract

WHEN the open access method of lending books was first introduced on safe‐guarded lines at Clerkenwell, over twelve years ago, a considerable amount of dolorous prophecy was set free, which sometimes formed rather depressing reading for those responsible for the experiment. As time went on, it became clear that many of the prophets based their vaticinations on imperfect knowledge of the actual arrangements in use, and it was then only a simple matter of allowing complete play to one's sense of humour, while the comedy of errors proceeded. One imaginative prophet pictured the time when painstaking librarians would be supplanted by a uniformed janitor, who would assume the functions of librarian, by the easy process of supervising the filtration of readers through a turnstile, like sheep through a hurdle. Another equally resourceful Quidnunc saw in his mind's eye, all the riff‐raff of London, filing through the little Clerkenwell wicket, like a Cup‐tie crowd at the Crystal Palace, without introduction, guarantee, or slightest degree of responsibility. Probably it was only a humorist, and not a prophet, who forsaw the introduction of weighing machines at both entrance and exit wickets, as a means of preventing wholesale thefts. These, and many other absurd misconceptions of the actual mechanical arrangements employed to overcome various anticipated difficulties, formed a considerable proportion of the prophetic utterances which advertised the open access system in its early days.

Details

New Library World, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1911

[In view of the approaching Conference of the Library Association at Perth, the following note on the Leighton Library may not be inopportune. Dunblane is within an hour's railway…

Abstract

[In view of the approaching Conference of the Library Association at Perth, the following note on the Leighton Library may not be inopportune. Dunblane is within an hour's railway journey from Perth and has a magnificent cathedral, founded in the twelfth century, which is well worthy of a visit.]

Details

New Library World, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 8 January 2020

Rachel Hendery and Andrew Burrell

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the possibility for the galleries, libraries, archives and museums sector to employ playful, immersive discovery interfaces for their…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the possibility for the galleries, libraries, archives and museums sector to employ playful, immersive discovery interfaces for their collections and raise awareness of some of the considerations that go into the decision to use such technology and the creation of the interfaces.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a case study approach using the methodology of research through design. The paper introduces two examples of immersive interfaces to archival data created by the authors, using these as a springboard for discussing the different kinds of embodied experiences that users have with different kinds of immersion, for example, the exploration of the archive on a flat screen, a data “cave” or arena, or virtual reality.

Findings

The role of such interfaces in communicating with the audience of an archive is considered, for example, in allowing users to detect structure in data, particularly in understanding the role of geographic or other spatial elements in a collection, and in shifting the locus of knowledge production from individual to community. It is argued that these different experiences draw on different metaphors in terms of users’ prior experience with more well-known technologies, for example, “a performance” vs “a tool” vs “a background to a conversation”.

Originality/value

The two example interfaces discussed here are original creations by the authors of this paper. They are the first uses of mixed reality for interfacing with the archives in question. One is the first mixed reality interface to an audio archive. The discussion has implications for the future of interfaces to galleries, archives, libraries and museums more generally.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 76 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 17 January 2022

Stephanie Brick

Service members of the US Department of Defense (DoD) have alarmingly high rates of depression, anxiety, probable stress disorders and suicidality, all of which are negative…

2429

Abstract

Purpose

Service members of the US Department of Defense (DoD) have alarmingly high rates of depression, anxiety, probable stress disorders and suicidality, all of which are negative health conditions exacerbated by various external stressors. High-stress work conditions – to include shift work, hazardous territories, high-stakes mission sets and generally disconnected sites – require a work environment that facilitates, rather than inhibits, stress reduction and mental well-being. This paper aims to present “salutogenic design” as an innovative approach: Salutogenic design offers demonstrated architectural solutions that improve health and well-being.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper describes salutogenic design strategies beginning with the need for such an approach, the call to action to implement strategic and tactical solutions and the challenges and financial impacts of such a broad and innovative strategy to improve workplace health, well-being and performance in the DoD and beyond. Examples of these strategies, via biophilic design solutions, are presented in the central Table 1 as an easy-to-reference tool and supported by the voluminous literature as referenced, in part, through this research paper.

Findings

Salutogenic design strategies offer innovative, financially viable solutions to help mitigate stress and improve workforce well-being while maintaining the highest level of building security requirements in access-controlled spaces and disconnected sites, such as military installations and government compounds.

Research limitations/implications

Issues of mental and physical health are complex and multi-faceted, and they require complex and multi-faceted solutions. Salutogenic design is presented as one facet of that solution: a tangible solution to an often-intangible issue. Further, as a novel approach to address a critical DoD issue, Table 1 bridges the common gap between high-concept design theory and practical construction-application solutions, with positive value to the health, performance, quality-of-life and well-being of service members.

Originality/value

To the best of the author’s knowledge, this paper is the first to approach the DoD’s imperative to reduce service members’ mental stress with “salutogenic design.”

Details

Facilities , vol. 40 no. 15/16
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 April 2020

Patience Tunji-Olayeni, Kahilu Kajimo-Shakantu and Ewaoluwa Osunrayi

The purpose of this study is to assess the drivers, practices and policies for implementing sustainable construction in Nigeria. This is with a view towards increasing the rate of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to assess the drivers, practices and policies for implementing sustainable construction in Nigeria. This is with a view towards increasing the rate of implementation and diffusion of sustainable construction practice, so that more Nigerians can benefit from its environmental, social and economic dividends.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopted a qualitative research design with the use of face-to-face oral interviews. Interviewees were selected using a purposive sampling technique. Data from the interview were analysed using thematic analysis. Descriptive statistics of frequencies, percentages and rankings were also used to present the data and complement the thematic analysis.

Findings

The study identified five major drivers of sustainable construction: clients' demand, international pressure, corporate social responsibility, competitiveness and cost-effectiveness. The common sustainable practices adopted by the interviewees are compliance with health and safety regulation, waste management, energy efficiency and material reuse. The most appropriate policies for implementing sustainable construction as suggested by the interviewees were government regulations, provision of tax relief and subsidies and public awareness. A combination of regulatory policies, market-based policies and voluntary participation of stakeholders will enhance the attainment of sustainability transformations in the construction industry

Originality/value

The study is based on the findings of construction participants who have practical experience with sustainable construction in Nigeria. The study also provides empirical evidences which could guide the design and implementation of policies that will further promote the diffusion of sustainable construction in Nigeria

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

Keywords

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