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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2018

Amirpurya Chavoshy, Kambod Amini Hosseini and Mahmood Hosseini

This study aims to provide resiliency against earthquakes to the framework of an urban road network and to construct a comprehensive model with sufficient computational…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to provide resiliency against earthquakes to the framework of an urban road network and to construct a comprehensive model with sufficient computational detail to assist metropolitan managers as a decision support tool in emergency situations via parametric analysis (model behaviour analysis with parameter changes) to quantify the consequences of decisions.

Design/methodology/approach

Performed stages are: developing existing resilience assessment frameworks for use against earthquakes in urban road networks, identifying earthquake scenarios and estimating the weight of components using AHP, including an example modelling of Tehran; and developing modelling software (using Matlab®).

Findings

This study produced a software that performs three-dimensional (3D) graphical modelling, resiliency index measurements and its parametric analyses for the road networks against earthquakes. Based on this model, a prioritized list of upgrades is also introduced. The developed tool also addresses issues regarding the allocation of limited resources between the network components.

Research limitations/implications

Because of the novelty of the study, there is limited literature on this topic.

Practical implications

The developed model provides urban managers with a comprehensive list of upgrades and empowering them to graphically and numerically evaluate the resiliency changes as they alter the parameters of these measures and balance their decisions based on available funding.

Originality/value

In contrast to previous studies, this study has focused on all of these three keywords: resiliency, earthquake and road networks, and not only two of them.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 9 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2016

Andrew Thomas, Paul Byard, Mark Francis, Ron Fisher and Gareth R.T. White

The purpose of this paper is to identify the tools, methods and models that UK manufacturing companies adopt and apply in order to achieve resiliency and economic…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the tools, methods and models that UK manufacturing companies adopt and apply in order to achieve resiliency and economic sustainability. The results of this work can assist in developing the foundations for defining a new joint resiliency/sustainability paradigm to assist industry.

Design/methodology/approach

Through a detailed, triangulated secondary data analysis and industry survey, the authors initially identify and then analyse the key resiliency and sustainability characteristics surrounding manufacturing operations. This paper initially reviews key literatures around resiliency and sustainability models and frameworks and subsequently draws out their key features and weaknesses. The work then details the research survey undertaken in to manufacturing companies aimed at identifying the resiliency/sustainability approaches that are adopted in companies. A sample of 72 manufacturing companies are used in the survey and from which the results are based.

Findings

Through analysing the fundamental business data of sales and manufacturing costs for 72 manufacturing companies, the authors cluster the companies in to four key manufacturing profiles. The work then shows through a more detailed analysis of the profiles that companies which are sustainable and more resilient in nature are, better engaged and connected to the development and application of resiliency and sustainability models. It was found that companies who seem to struggle in achieving economic sustainability or lack the ability to bounce back from various set-backs either do not employ such models or at best apply tools and techniques in an ad hoc manner.

Research limitations/implications

The paper provides key insights in to the adoption of tools, techniques and models surrounding the achievement of resiliency and sustainability in manufacturing companies. In so doing, the paper offers a new view on these issues and with the profiling exercise undertaken, companies will be able to identify their position in relation to the survey companies. This can be of benefit to the wider industrial and academic community. The development of a qualitative assessment around a relatively small sample size has its obvious limitations and it is crucial that further work with a range of companies in the area of manufacturing sustainability is key to developing (and also validating) a comprehensive set of resiliency and sustainability characteristics.

Practical implications

The paper highlights the issues surrounding existing academic resiliency/sustainability models and through the industry survey, it provides further information on where UK manufacturing companies are on adopting specific resiliency/sustainability models. The work suggests that the resiliency/sustainability landscape of UK manufacturing companies is much more complex and that a single strategic approach towards achieving improved manufacturing performance is somewhat dated and ineffective.

Originality/value

The development of a set of resiliency/sustainability profiles including the identification of the specific tools and techniques adopted by industry is aimed at tackling directly the issues of improving company performance and is considered by the authors as one of a kind. The results of the survey provide essential information on the resiliency/sustainability landscape of UK manufacturing companies.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 February 2015

Jesus N. Valero, Kyujin Jung and Simon A. Andrew

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of transformational leadership – broadly defined as an individual who is visionary, innovative, inspirational and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of transformational leadership – broadly defined as an individual who is visionary, innovative, inspirational and sensitive to the needs of followers – on the level of organizational resiliency.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employs multiple hierarchical regression analysis to test the causal relationship between transformational leadership and organizational resiliency by utilizing 112 respondents working in emergency management departments of local governments, fire and police stations, and nonprofit organizations in the Southeastern Economic Region of South Korea.

Findings

The results of the analysis indicate that transformational leadership style has a positive and statistically significant effect on perceived organizational resiliency. The findings also indicate that elected officials such as mayors are more likely to focus on building organizational resiliency than appointed officials and nonprofit leaders.

Originality/value

This study fills the gap of the current literature in the field of emergency management by establishing empirical evidence of the need to identify leaders with transformational traits in order to build a resilient organization, which can better respond and adapt to a catastrophic event in the Asian context.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 22 August 2006

Tawannah Allen

African American male students have traditionally received the most negative treatment by public educators. This study seeks to assess whether a school known to help…

Abstract

African American male students have traditionally received the most negative treatment by public educators. This study seeks to assess whether a school known to help disadvantaged students to become successful students will include African American males. The study used Henderson and Milstein's Six Trait Resiliency Model (2003): increase pro-social bonding, set clear and consistent boundaries, teach life skills, provide caring and support, set and communicate high expectations and provide opportunity for meaningful participation. This study examined the relationships between 12 African American male students in grades 3–8 and their 10 classroom teachers (nine Caucasians and one African American).

Details

No Child Left Behind and other Federal Programs for Urban School Districts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-299-3

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Article
Publication date: 20 February 2020

Patricia Peterson, Bill Morrison, Robert Laurie, Viviane Yvette Bolaños Gramajo and John Brock Morrison

This paper explores the use of the mental fitness and resiliency inventory (MFRI) as a tool for the management of workplace health and well-being. The MFRI provides…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper explores the use of the mental fitness and resiliency inventory (MFRI) as a tool for the management of workplace health and well-being. The MFRI provides information on the extent to which positive workplace practices are experienced within three mental fitness domains and five resiliency domains. The purpose of this study was to investigate the factorial structure and internal consistency of the MFRI.

Design/methodology/approach

The MFRI was administered to 1,519 employees in multiple workplace environments in Canada. The factorial structure of the MFRI was examined to conduct confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). In addition to the CFA indexes, the internal consistency of each latent construct was calculated, with results reported using Cronbach's coefficient alpha.

Findings

The reliability of the MFRI is very high (alpha = 0.973). The fit indexes from the CFA indicate that the model is permissible. The MFRI can be used with confidence to highlight mental fitness and resiliency strengths, as well as areas needing further development in workplace environments.

Research limitation/implications

Limitations may include the selection of fit indexes upon which to base judgment as to whether the model is satisfactory. Although the MFRI model has been confirmed based on the data from the study sample, there is not yet sufficient data to conclude that the model is a true predictive model. Current and ongoing research will enable elaboration on this matter. In addition, formal documented observations regarding the MFRI's face validity and ease of explanation and understanding of the results may confirm a priori expectations on the part of the users and may strengthen the conclusions from this study.

Practical implications

Implications for workplaces arising from the validation of the MFRI include a growth in capacity to measure the existence of positive psychology practices within organizational environments and to identify and address areas for needed growth and development. By assessing the prevalence of mental fitness and resiliency practices in workplace environments, reports can be produced that indicate various levels of development and integration of these practices. The application of the MFRI facilitates the use of evidence-informed decision-making in addressing organizational goals related to positive workplace cultures.

Originality/value

The MFRI is a new, validated instrument that measures the presence of positive practices that contribute to healthy and effective workplace cultures. The results of the MFRI provide workplace health managers with a profile of organizational strengths (practices that are embedded and comprehensive) and areas for development (practices requiring promotion and capacity building) related to mental fitness and resiliency.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 July 2019

Riza Yosia Sunindijo, Fatma Lestari and Oktomi Wijaya

This study aims to assess the hospital readiness and resiliency in a disaster-prone Indonesia.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to assess the hospital readiness and resiliency in a disaster-prone Indonesia.

Design/methodology/approach

Hospital Safety Index (HSI), containing 151 items, was used to assess ten hospital in West Java and five hospitals in Yogyakarta.

Findings

The average level of HSI for the hospitals under investigation is B, indicating that their ability to function during and after emergencies and disasters are potentially at risk, thus, intervention measures are needed in the short term. Hospitals in Yogyakarta scored lowly in terms of their emergency and disaster management, even though they have previously experienced major disasters in 2006 and 2010.

Practical implications

The role of the government is crucial to improve hospital readiness and resiliency in Indonesia. It is recommended that they: identify disaster-prone areas so that their hospital readiness and resiliency can be assessed; assess the readiness and resiliency of hospitals the prioritized areas; implement intervention measures; re-assess the readiness and resiliency of hospitals in the prioritized areas after implementing intervention measures; and develop a framework to ensure that the hospitals can maintain their level of readiness and resiliency over time.

Originality/value

Research on hospital readiness and resiliency in Indonesia is still limited despite the size of the country and its proneness to disasters. This research has investigated the feasibility and value of using HSI to assess hospital readiness and resilience in Indonesia.

Details

Facilities , vol. 38 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 May 2014

Christopher S. Howard and Justin A. Irving

The aim of this paper is to report findings from research conducted that links the role of obstacles defined by developmental antecedents to the level of resilience within…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to report findings from research conducted that links the role of obstacles defined by developmental antecedents to the level of resilience within a leader.

Design/methodology/approach

The study reflects responses from 167 participants and utilizes leadership antecedents categories, the Differentiation of Self Inventory, Short Form and the Connor Davidson Resilience Scale.

Findings

The results demonstrate that resiliency is positively correlated with both the leadership antecedents and differentiation of self. In light of the research findings, the authors will highlight the relationship between resiliency and the leadership antecedents (including developmental assignments, developmental relationships, developmental experiences, and developmental training), highlight the relationship between resiliency and differentiation of self, and provide rationale for the absence of a relationship between differentiation of self and the leadership antecedents.

Research limitations/implications

The study does not demonstrate how the developmental antecedents might work in combination with one another to develop resiliency. Therefore, one recommendation would be to further verify the interrelationship of developmental antecedents and the nature of their relationship with leader resiliency. If research can determine the interrelationship of these developmental antecedents on the development of resilience, then implications exist within the leadership formation process and for new forms of leadership training.

Originality/value

Based on the findings, the authors intend to provide an argument for why obstacles and developmental experiences are a logical and necessary part of the formation process for leaders and suggest the importance of emerging leaders attending to this dimension of their own leadership formation journey.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 37 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 24 April 2007

Rose Grunstein and Don Nutbeam

The purpose of this study is to examine characteristics of resilience among Australian adolescents, the extent to which resilience might be strengthened through…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine characteristics of resilience among Australian adolescents, the extent to which resilience might be strengthened through participation in a dance/drama competition, the Rock Eisteddfod Challenge (REC), and the impact participation may have on health related behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

Students completed questionnaires at the commencement of the REC planning and rehearsals in schools. The survey was repeated immediately after completion of the competition. Three groups of students were compared comprised students engaged in the REC (participants), students from Rock Eisteddfod schools who did not participate in the Rock Eisteddfod Challenge (REC school non‐participants) and students from schools that did not participate in the Rock Eisteddfod Challenge (control school students). The questionnaire was designed to measure changes to key modifiable elements of resiliency and selected health behaviours.

Findings

The majority of participants in the REC were girls, and the analysis of results was restricted to a matched group of girls from Year 9 (age 13‐14) and above. Girls in this group from REC schools scored significantly higher in measures of overall resiliency during the rehearsal period than students from control schools. Within REC schools, participants scored higher for a combined measure of resiliency than non‐participants. High scores for resiliency were consistently associated with lower prevalence of reported substance misuse across the whole sample. In general, increases in substance use observed over the time period from baseline to follow up was less in the REC group than the control group.

Research limitations/implications

Several methodological problems were encountered in this study, including identification of adequate measures of personal skills and characteristics, difficulty in obtaining a true pre‐intervention point to commence the study; and in identifying a large balanced sample of students that would allow for meaningful analysis of results; as well as the normal difficulties of identifying and maintaining contact with a large cohort of students in many different sites. For these reasons, the results need to be treated cautiously, and “causal” conclusions about the intervention could only be preliminary.

Practical implications

The study indicates the potential benefits of participation in programmes like the REC, and the results are consistent with other studies indicating positive associations between participation in the REC and a range of positive personal, social and behavioural outcomes.

Originality/value

The paper highlights some of the methodological challenges in conducting a prospective assessment of the effects of participation in a health oriented dance/drama event. It indicates the potential of this type of activity as a vehicle for the communication of health messages, and the possibility of a more direct influence on personal skills and health related behaviour.

Details

Health Education, vol. 107 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 November 2019

Myoung-Soung Lee and Sang-Lin Han

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of relationship bonds on the psychological response and behavior of bank employees based on the job demands–resources…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of relationship bonds on the psychological response and behavior of bank employees based on the job demands–resources theory. Specifically, it examines the effects of relationship bonds in terms of person–job (P–J) fit, emotional exhaustion, job satisfaction and boundary-spanning behaviors, all of which comprise the behavioral dimensions of bank employees. In addition, the study examines how the resiliency of bank employees influences their emotional exhaustion and determines whether a moderating effect related to emotional exhaustion exists.

Design/methodology/approach

To achieve this aim, data were collected from 365 customer-facing banking employees in South Korea. Reliability, validity and the hypotheses were verified through structural equation modeling; any moderating effects were identified using the bootstrap method and the process model.

Findings

Study results showed that financial, structural, internal social and external social bonds – the bonds pertaining to relationship elements – have positive effects on P–J fit. P–J fit influenced emotional exhaustion negatively and job satisfaction positively. Furthermore, emotional exhaustion negatively influenced job satisfaction. Job satisfaction had positive effects on service delivery, external representation and internal influence, the elements comprising boundary-spanning behavior. Finally, resiliency was shown to lower emotional exhaustion but revealed no moderating effect.

Originality/value

First, this study examined relationship bonds, which reference relationship marketing when introducing organizational resources that influence the psychological and behavioral responses of bank employees. Second, this study introduced resiliency as a personal resource and clarified the way it applies to an individual’s psychological response. Third, existing literature has been limited to conducting fragmented research of the psychological factors that intervene in predisposing factors and job outcomes. This study makes a unique contribution by establishing a psychological response process.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 38 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 May 2014

Christopher B. Davison

The purpose of this paper is to present the findings that describe any correlations between leadership demographic characteristics with that of the levels of business…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the findings that describe any correlations between leadership demographic characteristics with that of the levels of business continuity (BC) and disaster recovery (DR) planning by surveying the academic department's continuity planners at two major research universities in Southern California.

Design/methodology/approach

The research methodology was a quantitative method utilizing a correlational research design (logistic regression). Survey data from a self-reporting web-based survey were analyzed.

Findings

Analysis of five leadership demographic characteristics and four covariates reveals one statistically significant predictor of resiliency planning. Furthermore, close to one-quarter of the academic departments were found to have no BC or DR plan. Conversely, having a budget for resiliency planning was not found to be a significant predictor of resiliency planning.

Research limitations/implications

This study was specifically limited to continuity planners within two major, public, academic research institutions within Southern California. This allows for an in-depth understanding of a specific contingency planning phenomenon: geographically bounded public, research-oriented, higher education institutions. This study could provide a framework for administrative leaders in academic settings to assess their organizations’ capacity for recovery from an unexpected business disruption. This study could assist university administration in identifying personnel to lead resiliency planning within the institution.

Practical implications

The research indicates that educational institutions lack in organizational resiliency planning. This study could provide a framework for administrative leaders in academic settings to assess their organizations’ capacity for recovery from an unexpected business disruption.

Originality/value

While there is much literature on the separate topics of leadership in an academic environment and contingency planning, no study exists that attempts to observe any correlations between these concepts.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

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