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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1978

Alison Paul BSc and D.A.T. Southgate PhD

Alison Paul BSc (Nutrition) and D. A. T. Southgate PhD discuss the limitations and use of food composition tables. This is the second of two articles to mark the publication of…

Abstract

Alison Paul BSc (Nutrition) and D. A. T. Southgate PhD discuss the limitations and use of food composition tables. This is the second of two articles to mark the publication of the fourth revised edition of McCance and Widdowson's The Composition of Food.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 78 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1978

Alison Paul and D.A.T. Southgate

Food composition tables are an essential tool for anyone wishing to calculate the nutrient content of a diet, whether for use in therapeutic dietetics or in nutritional surveys…

Abstract

Food composition tables are an essential tool for anyone wishing to calculate the nutrient content of a diet, whether for use in therapeutic dietetics or in nutritional surveys both at the national and research level. They also provide much of the information on which the teaching of the nutritional values of foods is based.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 78 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1986

Michael Kipps, Carol Noble and James Thomson

In early April this year there was much media coverage of a government preliminary report that was stated to have commented about the eating habits of a sample of 3000 children…

Abstract

In early April this year there was much media coverage of a government preliminary report that was stated to have commented about the eating habits of a sample of 3000 children aged 10–15 years old. The report was said to have contained results which indicated that many children were eating foods high in animal fat and sugar, while low in fibre. Diets were said to be deficient in vegetables and fruit, and in lean meat. Concern was expressed about the levels of vitamins and minerals in children's diets. We will have to await publication of the full report before commenting further, but it is appropriate to mention it now because it provides a useful context in which to view the results of a study of school meals in the ILEA carried out at the University of Surrey. Michael Kipps MSc, Carol Noble BSc and James Thomson PhD describe their study and summarise the results.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 86 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Article
Publication date: 16 August 2019

Julieann Coombes and Courtney Ryder

One’s standpoint and consequent research paradigm impacts how we conduct research, including study design, analyses interpretation and dissemination of results. In 2017, the…

Abstract

Purpose

One’s standpoint and consequent research paradigm impacts how we conduct research, including study design, analyses interpretation and dissemination of results. In 2017, the authors began PhD, studying the potential barriers to aftercare treatment for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children aged under 16 who had sustained a burn injury in one of five major hospitals in Australia. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

As Aboriginal PhD students, the authors are conducting research using Aboriginal ontology as a framework, which is based on a holistic framework with interconnectedness, person-centred care and Aboriginal ways of knowing as the foundation. The framework has been shaped by the first author’s knowing, being and doing, and the authors’ worldview has informed and shaped the standpoint and the way the research has been developed and conducted.

Findings

It was important for the authors to have a connectedness to each aspect of the research and to each individual person that shared their story: this was paramount to the ways of being.

Originality/value

This connectedness stems from growing up on the authors’ country and learning from elders, from the connection to all entities living around, within and with the authors. The Indigenous research methodology was used throughout the study, including yarning and Dadirri, a way of deep listening and learning, as the basis for interviewing.

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2007

Erick T. Byrd

Sustainability has become an important topic and concept in relation to tourism planning and development. For sustainable tourism development to be successful stakeholders must be…

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Abstract

Sustainability has become an important topic and concept in relation to tourism planning and development. For sustainable tourism development to be successful stakeholders must be involved in the process. The questions that should be considered though are: (1) who should be considered stakeholders in tourism development, and (2) how should planners and developers involve stakeholders in the development of tourism? In order to provide answers to these questions this paper investigated sustainable tourism development and how stakeholder inclusion and involvement are incorporated in the basic concept of sustainable tourism development. This investigation was accomplished by reviewing and drawing conclusions from the literature. The discussion includes thoughts from both management and public participation perspectives. So who should be involved in the sustainable tourism development process? Based on the definitions that are used for sustainability and sustainable tourism four distinct groups are identified; the present visitors, future visitors, present host community, and future host community.

Details

Tourism Review, vol. 62 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1660-5373

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 June 2021

Frank Alpert, Mark Brown, Elizabeth Ferrier, Claudia Fernanda Gonzalez-Arcos and Rico Piehler

This study aims to investigate marketing managers’ views on the existence and nature of the academic–practitioner gap in the branding domain.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate marketing managers’ views on the existence and nature of the academic–practitioner gap in the branding domain.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a purposive sampling method, the researchers conduct semi-structured qualitative interviews with 20 experienced marketing managers from a wide range of industries and organisations, whose roles are focussed on the planning, implementation and management of broad marketing and branding strategies.

Findings

Branding practitioners have little or no contact with academics and their theories-in-use with regard to brand management suggest they do not consider academic research relevant to their work.

Research limitations/implications

The process of describing and explaining the gap provides valuable insights into bridging the gap; it provides actionable branding strategies that include raising awareness, building relationships, improving the benefits offer and communicating more effectively.

Practical implications

This research has practical implications for branding academics. The interviewed practitioners confirm the gap, viewing it as academics’ (not practitioners’) problem and responsibility. They characterise it as a branding problem that academics can overcome using branding strategies, to establish themselves as credible sources of branding expertise for practitioners. Key areas for increasing collaboration stem from practitioners’ desire for independent, credible, ethical and timely third-party advice on branding issues; relevant, timely and shorter professional branding education across their organisations; and closer connections with universities to identify new branding talent and ideas.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this paper is the first to empirically examine and recommend solutions to the academic-practitioner gap in the branding domain by studying marketing professionals with branding responsibilities, using in-depth interviews.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1985

Colin Berry

Imagine Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norkey arriving at the summit of Everest (29,029 ft) in 1953, only to discover that they were standing on several thousand feet of ice…

Abstract

Imagine Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norkey arriving at the summit of Everest (29,029 ft) in 1953, only to discover that they were standing on several thousand feet of ice. Imagine the questions that would have followed. Had they climbed the wrong mountain? Could they still legitimately claim to be standing at the highest point on the Earth's surface? How should the heights of mountains be recorded for official purposes?

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 85 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1974

The growing range of EEC Directives and Regulations for food products, some of which have never been subject to statutory control in this country, with compositional standards…

Abstract

The growing range of EEC Directives and Regulations for food products, some of which have never been subject to statutory control in this country, with compositional standards, and in particular, prescribed methods of analysis — something which has not featured in the food legislative policies here — must be causing enforcement authorities and food processors to think seriously, if as yet not furiously. Some of the prescribed methods of analysis are likely to be less adaptable to modern processing methods of foods and as Directives seem to be requiring more routine testing, there is the matter of cost. Directive requirements are to some extent negotiable — the EEC Commission allow for regional differences, e.g., in milk and bread — but it has to be remembered that EEC Regulations bind Member‐states from the date of notification by the Commission, over‐riding the national law. Although not so frequently used for food legislation, they constitute one of the losses of sovereign power, paraded by the anti‐market lobby. Regulations contain usual clauses that they “shall enter into force on the day following publication in the Official Journal of the European Communities” and that they “shall be binding in their entirety and directly applicable in all Member States”.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 76 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 11 April 2016

Khondker Galib B. Mohiuddin, Ross Gordon, Christopher Magee and Jeong Kyu Lee

The purpose of this paper is to present a conceptual framework of cool for social marketing through a comprehensive literature review and integrating extant literature on cool.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a conceptual framework of cool for social marketing through a comprehensive literature review and integrating extant literature on cool.

Design/methodology/approach

A comprehensive search and review of extant literature across social marketing, business disciplines, arts, psychology, social sciences and humanities was undertaken to develop an understanding of cool and its relevance to social marketing. The review permitted developing a comprehensive set of characteristics that are associated with cool.

Findings

A conceptual framework of cool organised according to the following dimensions is presented and discussed: deviating from norm, self-expressive, indicative of maturity, subversive, pro-social, evasive, and attractive.

Originality/value

This paper advances theoretical knowledge in the social marketing domain by offering a conceptual framework of cool, and by suggesting a set of guidelines to develop cool social marketing programs.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Keith Crosier

580

Abstract

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

1 – 10 of 62