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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1988

John Nicholls

A distinction was drawn by Burns, the political scientist, between transforming and transactional leadership. The notion of transforming leadership struck a chord with…

Abstract

A distinction was drawn by Burns, the political scientist, between transforming and transactional leadership. The notion of transforming leadership struck a chord with behavioural scientists, but discrepancies and internal inconsistencies in their application of the concept arose. A way of clarifying the situation is to view transforming leadership as the application of meta leadership “visioning” to the macro‐leadership role of pathfinding and culture building. This idea is explored, taking a close look at transforming leadership as propounded by Burns.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Book part
Publication date: 11 August 2014

Lawton Robert Burns, Jeff C. Goldsmith and Aditi Sen

Researchers recommend a reorganization of the medical profession into larger groups with a multispecialty mix. We analyze whether there is evidence for the superiority of…

Abstract

Purpose

Researchers recommend a reorganization of the medical profession into larger groups with a multispecialty mix. We analyze whether there is evidence for the superiority of these models and if this organizational transformation is underway.

Design/Methodology Approach

We summarize the evidence on scale and scope economies in physician group practice, and then review the trends in physician group size and specialty mix to conduct survivorship tests of the most efficient models.

Findings

The distribution of physician groups exhibits two interesting tails. In the lower tail, a large percentage of physicians continue to practice in small, physician-owned practices. In the upper tail, there is a small but rapidly growing percentage of large groups that have been organized primarily by non-physician owners.

Research Limitations

While our analysis includes no original data, it does collate all known surveys of physician practice characteristics and group practice formation to provide a consistent picture of physician organization.

Research Implications

Our review suggests that scale and scope economies in physician practice are limited. This may explain why most physicians have retained their small practices.

Practical Implications

Larger, multispecialty groups have been primarily organized by non-physician owners in vertically integrated arrangements. There is little evidence supporting the efficiencies of such models and some concern they may pose anticompetitive threats.

Originality/Value

This is the first comprehensive review of the scale and scope economies of physician practice in nearly two decades. The research results do not appear to have changed much; nor has much changed in physician practice organization.

Details

Annual Review of Health Care Management: Revisiting The Evolution of Health Systems Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-715-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1899

THIS Indicator was invented by Mr. Alfred Cotgreave, the present Librarian of West Ham, when he was librarian of the Wednesbury Public Library, in 1877. At the time of his…

Abstract

THIS Indicator was invented by Mr. Alfred Cotgreave, the present Librarian of West Ham, when he was librarian of the Wednesbury Public Library, in 1877. At the time of his invention an Elliot Indicator was in use at Wednesbury, and it was owing to the misplacement of borrowers' tickets in this Indicator, that Mr. Cotgreave's attention was drawn to the question of providing some remedy. He tried various schemes to prevent such mistakes, but ultimately decided that movable numbered blocks, filling up every space in the Indicator would best meet the difficulty. An Indicator on this principle was thereon designed, and later, the numbered blocks were replaced by wooden blocks having a record book attached. The Handsworth Public Library first adopted this Indicator. Subsequently the wooden block was superseded by a metal slide in which the little book carrying the record of issues was placed. In this form the Cotgreave Indicator has existed for a number of years, and it is so well known that it is almost unnecessary to give a description of it in detail. However, I have transcribed an account of its structure and working from one of the descriptive circulars issued in connection with it, from which anyone can gather a good idea of its appearance and use :—

Details

New Library World, vol. 2 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2009

Miriam Green

The purpose of this paper is to examine why there were different representations and research applications of Burns and Stalker's The Management of Innovation.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine why there were different representations and research applications of Burns and Stalker's The Management of Innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach primarily takes the form of an examination of academic journals, in particular The Administrative Science Quarterly between 1960 and 1980. Theoretical works, in particular by Bourdieu, were also used.

Findings

Contrary to accepted knowledge, the journals were eclectic in their approaches and did not require authors to adopt positivist approaches.

Research limitations/implications

A fuller answer to the question posed would require interviews with journal editors and university policy makers from the 1960s‐1980s. This has not been possible so far. Although some answers have been provided, questions still remain as to why certain representations of this book were dominant.

Practical implications

There are implications as to what counts as knowledge in academe, and how this knowledge should be treated, given that it may only partially represent the theory above and also other theories. This has implications for what is taught in universities and what is adopted by consultants as bona fide knowledge.

Originality/value

To the author's knowledge such questions using this type of research have not been examined in the detail pursued here.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

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Article
Publication date: 2 November 2015

Nizar Mohammad Alsharari, Robert Dixon and Mayada Abd El-Aziz Youssef

– This paper aims to introduce and discuss a new contextual framework to explain the processes of management accounting change in various organizations.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to introduce and discuss a new contextual framework to explain the processes of management accounting change in various organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

Having an institutional perspective, the paper develops a “conceptual contextual framework” of management accounting change. The methodology to accomplish this theory building consists of an integration of a number of different works summarizing the common elements, contrasting the differences and extending the work in some fashion. Particularly, it draws on theoretical triangulation by adopting three approaches: old institutional economics for internal processes and factors (Burns and Scapens, 2000); new institutional sociology for external processes and pressures (Dillard et al., 2004); and power and politics mobilization (Hardy, 1996).

Findings

The proposed framework provides an understanding of the complex “mixture” of interrelated factors that may influence management accounting change at multi-institutional levels: political and economic level, organizational field level and organizational level.

Research limitations/implications

The framework extends institutional theory-based management accounting research as well as provides a comprehensive basis for examining dynamics of accounting in the institutionalization process. Through further research, the framework will be extended and refined.

Practical implications

The paper has practical implications for practitioners and officers as well as for the accounting profession and academics alike.

Originality/value

The proposed contextual framework provides insights into the processes of change by focusing attention on the underlying institutions that encode accounting systems or practices in three institutional levels: political and economic level, the organizational field level and organization level. Examining the tension between institutionalized beliefs and values that may occur between these three levels of institutions will enhance our understanding of management accounting change in organizations.

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

L. Welling, M. Boers, D.P. Mackie, P. Patka, J.J.L.M. Bierens, J.S.K. Luitse and R.W. Kreis

The optimum response to the different stages of a major burns incident is still not established. The fire in a café in Volendam on New Year's Eve 2000 was the worst…

Abstract

Purpose

The optimum response to the different stages of a major burns incident is still not established. The fire in a café in Volendam on New Year's Eve 2000 was the worst incident in recent Dutch history and resulted in mass burn casualties. The fire has been the subject of several investigations concerned with organisational and medical aspects. Based on the findings in these investigations, a multidisciplinary research group started a consensus study. The aim of this study was to further identify areas of improvement in the care after mass burns incidents.

Design/methodology/approach

The consensus process comprised three postal rounds (Delphi Method) and a consensus conference (modified nominal group technique). The multidisciplinary panel consisted of 26 Dutch‐speaking experts, working in influential positions within the sphere of disaster management and healthcare.

Findings

In response to the postal questionnaires, consensus was reached for 66 per cent of the statements. Six topics were subsequently discussed during the consensus conference; three topics were discussed within the plenary session and three during subgroup meetings. During the conference, consensus was reached for seven statements (one subject generated two statements). In total, the panel agreed on 21 statements. These covered the following topics: registration and evaluation of disaster care, capacity planning for disasters, pre hospital care of victims of burns disasters, treatment and transportation priorities, distribution of casualties (including interhospital transports), diagnosis and treatment and education and training.

Originality/value

In disaster medicine, the paper shows how a consensus process is a suitable tool to identify areas of improvement of care after mass burns incidents.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Abstract

Details

Action Learning and Action Research: Genres and Approaches
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-537-5

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Book part
Publication date: 28 August 2020

Sandra Abegglen, Tom Burns, Simone Maier and Sandra Sinfield

The chapter explores the value of dialogue and the dialogic for developing student and staff agency, “voice” and ethics in the context of a first-year undergraduate module…

Abstract

The chapter explores the value of dialogue and the dialogic for developing student and staff agency, “voice” and ethics in the context of a first-year undergraduate module of the BA Hons Education Studies, an undergraduate course at The Sir John Cass School of Art, Architecture and Design and a Postgraduate Certificate of Learning and Teaching in Higher Education module, at London Metropolitan University, United Kingdom. The authors take a case study approach, making use of Freire’s ideas of critical pedagogy, to reflect on their personal learning and teaching experience as well as the feedback received from students and staff. The aim of the chapter is to explore how to empower (non-traditional) students and staff – and bridge the gap between students’ and teachers’ understanding of what this might entail. Rather than trying to bring students “up to speed” to prepare them for successful study and a professional career, or better “train” staff to deliver policy and strategy, we argue that we need to welcome them for the people they are as we help them to navigate a Higher Education system in need of humanizing.

Details

Improving Classroom Engagement and International Development Programs: International Perspectives on Humanizing Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-473-6

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Article
Publication date: 28 September 2012

Miriam Green

The purpose of this paper is to examine what counts as knowledge in the organization/management field.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine what counts as knowledge in the organization/management field.

Design/methodology/approach

Conventional, legitimated knowledge is analyzed through research into representations of an influential management text. Management and management accounting textbooks and research papers are investigated to establish the types of knowledge produced.

Findings

Mainstream representations of this book are partial, focusing on a “model” of what is likely to ensure successful organizational change – structural and systemic adaptations. What has been ignored is the problematization of structural change and the role of human agency. The foci and omissions of these representations cohere with divisions in the social sciences more generally – between “objectivist” and “subjectivist” ontologies and epistemologies.

Research limitations/implications

There is a need for further research into representations of texts about organizational change, the way the objectivist/subjectivist divide is played out, and its significance for organization/management studies and more widely for the social sciences.

Practical implications

Questions arise as to the validity and sustainability of such knowledge. Omissions about the difficulties in implementing structural change raise epistemological and practical difficulties for students, managers and consultants.

Social implications

Omissions of human subjectivities and agency from mainstream knowledge is problematic regarding successful organizational change and social issues more widely.

Originality/value

The paper's value lies in the in‐depth analysis of representations of a text in the organization/management area and the linking of the type of knowledge produced with broader epistemological and methodological issues in the social sciences.

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Article
Publication date: 23 September 2014

Umesh Sharma, Stewart Lawrence and Alan Lowe

The purpose of this paper is to explicate the role of institutional entrepreneurs who use accounting technology to accomplish change within a privatised telecommunications…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explicate the role of institutional entrepreneurs who use accounting technology to accomplish change within a privatised telecommunications company.

Design/methodology

The case study method is adopted. The authors draw on recent extension to institutional theory that gives greater emphasis to agency including concepts such as embeddedness, institutional entrepreneurs and institutional contradiction.

Findings

As part of the consequences of new public management reforms, we illustrate how institutional entrepreneurs de-established an older state-run bureaucratic and engineering-based routine and replaced it with a business- and accounting-based routine. Eventually, new accounting routines were reproduced and taken for granted by telecommunications management and employees.

Research Limitations/implications

As this study is limited to a single case study, no generalisation except to theory can be made. There are implications for privatisation of state sector organisations both locally and internationally.

Originality/value

The paper makes a contribution to elaborating the role of institutional entrepreneurs as agents of change towards privatisation and how accounting was used as a technology of change.

Details

Qualitative Research in Accounting & Management, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1176-6093

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