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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2015

Lillian Do Nascimento Gambi, Harry Boer, Mateus Cecilio Gerolamo, Frances Jørgensen and Luiz Cesar Ribeiro Carpinetti

The purpose of this paper is to investigate if a firm’s organizational culture affects the set of quality techniques it uses, and if these quality techniques affect the…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate if a firm’s organizational culture affects the set of quality techniques it uses, and if these quality techniques affect the relationship between organizational culture and operational performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on data collected from 250 firms in Brazil and Denmark, structural equation modeling is used to investigate the relationship between organizational culture and the use of quality techniques, and its impact on operational performance. Four quality technique groups, four cultural profiles adopted from the Competing Values Framework and a set of operational performance indicators are used to operationalize the study.

Findings

Culture does not appear to be an unequivocal predictor of the use of quality techniques. Furthermore, while most quality technique groups contribute indirectly to the total effect on operational performance in the developmental, group and hierarchical cultures, the performance effects are insignificant for all four groups in the rational culture.

Practical implications

Managers need to be actively aware of the cultural characteristics of their organization before adopting quality techniques, in order to benefit most from the use of these techniques.

Originality/value

Most previous studies address the relationships between culture, quality management and performance at the level of quality practices. This study takes the unitarist-pluralist discussion to the level of quality techniques and extends that discussion to what should be its core, namely, the influence of quality techniques on the performance impact of culture.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 35 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2011

Kumaran Rajaram and Sarbari Bordia

The purpose of this paper is to investigate a new trend of training mainland Chinese students in Western‐style business education in Singapore. The paper examines the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate a new trend of training mainland Chinese students in Western‐style business education in Singapore. The paper examines the influence of the inferred learning effectiveness and cultural dislocation variables when measured across ten commonly used instructional techniques.

Design/methodology/approach

The use of consensual qualitative research allowed the data to be qualitatively analysed. The random selection of 20 participants represents mainland Chinese students, from the northern, southern, eastern and western regions. The study reports the level of knowledge acquisition, the relationship between comfort and knowledge acquired and the differences between the active and passive instructional techniques on students' learning effectiveness.

Findings

Rote‐learning styles of instructional techniques may not be the Chinese students' only preferred choice in terms of acquisition of knowledge and how they learn most effectively.

Research limitations/implications

The present exploratory study provides a starting‐point for further research into understanding how to teach Western‐based business education to mainland Chinese students in Singapore.

Practical implications

The findings will give institutions conducting Western‐based education programs in Singapore an advantage in providing effective learning pedagogies, and will assist in increasing their quality, which will enable them to nurture well‐qualified business professionals.

Social implications

The quality of the educational standard and its compatibility with the Asian client base are further enhanced both in terms of contents' intensity and educational services provided to students.

Originality/value

The paper offers practical help from the perspective of the curriculum design and development of an effective business educational framework to sustain profitability by offering tailor‐made, superior quality course programs.

Details

Journal of International Education in Business, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-469X

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

Penny Dick and Devi Jankowicz

The police organisation receives much media attention regarding its record on Equal Opportunities. Research suggests that the organisational culture in police…

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5149

Abstract

The police organisation receives much media attention regarding its record on Equal Opportunities. Research suggests that the organisational culture in police organisations plays a major role in impeding the progress of women. Using repertory grid technique, the culture of a police force, conceptualised at the level of performance value judgements or recipe knowledge was investigated. It is argued that rank, rather than gender has the greatest influence on the content of performance value judgements and that this is attributable to the way that hierarchy influences the way in which the grass‐roots role is constructed. We argue that women’s progression is impeded not because of dominant constructions of the role per se, but by the way such constructions intersect with broader socio‐cultural constructions of women’s domestic roles.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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School-Based Evaluation: An International Perspective
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-143-9

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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2018

Alina Lavrynenko, Natalia Shmatko and Dirk Meissner

The purpose of this paper is to explore the composition of skillsets in biotechnology from the perspective of employers and its relation to open innovation processes in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the composition of skillsets in biotechnology from the perspective of employers and its relation to open innovation processes in the sector. It provides conclusions for HR management practice.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on job advertisements content analysis and in-depth interviews with chiefs of research and development companies. It uses biotechnology as an example of industry where open innovation practice implementation is expanding. The authors have used data from American, British and Russian job search engines.

Findings

It is demonstrated that skills composition required in biotechnology does not vary significantly among selected countries as the market becomes increasingly globalized in terms of not only technology used but also personnel hired. Companies stress more on hard and digital skills, while soft skills appear to be a “must have without saying,” The mismatch between skills presented in the advertisements and articulated in the interviews has been found as employers tend to demonstrate innovation friendly company culture for possible applicants.

Originality/value

The present paper enriches literature on employee skills for open innovation. It gives comprehensive lists of biotech skills in-demand divided into hard, digital and soft categories and interprets them within the context of employee cognition and behavior. The new insight into employee skills articulated by the companies as a strong element of organizational culture is presented.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 56 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 6 June 2008

Elaine Swan

The purpose of this paper is to ask how we can think about critical reflection as a pedagogical practice given the “confessional turn”. By the “confessional turn” the…

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2938

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to ask how we can think about critical reflection as a pedagogical practice given the “confessional turn”. By the “confessional turn” the author refers to the idea that “subjective, autobiographical and confessional modes of expression” have expanded exponentially across a wide range of social spheres, including education, the legal system, the media and the workplace. Examining these developments, this paper asks what these debates on critical reflection and confession mean for pedagogical practice.

Design/methodology/approach

The main approach is a review of key debates in the literature on critical reflection and also in the wider social sciences.

Findings

The discussion compares different debates. Thus it shows that for critics, the turn to the “first person” technologies is narcissistic, psychologistic and de‐politicising. On this view, critical reflective practice might be understood as an individualistic and individualising pedagogy in spite of its claims to be critical. The paper discusses how in contrast, others see this move to talk about the subjective and the self as an extension of the feminist project of the personal is political – i.e. that personal stories, feelings and issues have social and political roots and consequences. For them, reflection can be critical, leading to political consciousness‐raising, i.e. a new awareness about social, political and personal processes. It finishes by examining the view that the idea of reflexivity might help us out of the conflict between these debates.

Practical implications

The paper poses a number of questions in relation to critical reflection that can be taken up by practitioners in the field.

Originality/value of paper

The paper brings new literature to bear on the practice of critical reflection and raises important questions relevant to academics and practitioners.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 24 August 2020

Vilani Sachitra and Chandra Padmini

It is imperative to offer a new perspective of Entrepreneurial Growth Intention (EGI) that draws directly upon the capability approach. The aim of this study is to…

Abstract

Purpose

It is imperative to offer a new perspective of Entrepreneurial Growth Intention (EGI) that draws directly upon the capability approach. The aim of this study is to investigate the role of capabilities in the context of EGI in the floriculture industry in Sri Lanka.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was exploratory and is mainly qualitative in nature. In-depth interviews were carried out with the owners of farms who possess experience in floriculture commercial cultivation in Sri Lanka.

Findings

The results emerged that there are different perspectives among farm owners regarding EGI. Drawing attention on the stories of our participants and making a three-phase analysis, we identified 31 key actions denoted by the farm owners. This work then suggests that the seven capabilities might be fruitfully framed around EGI.

Research limitations/implications

As the results stress the role of capabilities in the formation of an entrepreneur's growth intention is vital. Therefore, more targeted measures should be drawn to build fair and supportive facilities to obtain advanced knowledge, to familiarise with the emergence of technology and to attain professional services specifically in financial literacy.

Originality/value

The question of what factors influence EGI at the farm level is still largely unexplored as less is known about the effect of capabilities on EGI. The study expands the current debates on EGI and institutional environment, which allows the mapping out of capability development.

Details

South Asian Journal of Business Studies, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-628X

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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2008

Yvon Pesqueux

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Society and Business Review, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5680

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2020

Vilani Sachitra and Chandra Padmini

It is aware that entrepreneurial growth has gained some attention in the literature, yet the debate in respect of the determinants of entrepreneurial growth intention…

Abstract

Purpose

It is aware that entrepreneurial growth has gained some attention in the literature, yet the debate in respect of the determinants of entrepreneurial growth intention (EGI) is far from being complete. The purpose of this study is to identify the key dynamic capabilities that foster EGI in floriculture industry in Sri Lanka.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used quantitative approach. The owners of farms who possess commercial experience in floriculture cultivation in Sri Lanka were selected as a target population. A self-administrated structured questionnaire was used to collect data. Valid and reliable indicators were developed to conceptualize five key capabilities and EGI.

Findings

Based on the responses from 206 farm owners, results of the multiple regression analysis indicate that organizational learning, technological and alliance formation capabilities are significantly associated with EGI of floriculture farm owners.

Originality/value

The need for common conceptualization of dynamic capabilities and EGI represents a major gap in the literature. The study expands the current debates on entrepreneurial growth and institutional environment, which allows the mapping out of dynamic capability development.

Details

World Journal of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5961

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Article
Publication date: 18 December 2018

Nimruji Jammulamadaka

The purpose of this paper is to examine the value of decolonial approaches (DAs) such as epistemic locus (Mignolo, 1995, 2000) in studying innovation.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the value of decolonial approaches (DAs) such as epistemic locus (Mignolo, 1995, 2000) in studying innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on a case study of a stem cell surgical innovation developed in India. A critical hermeneutic analysis method has been followed for data analysis.

Findings

Epistemic locus influences the framing of the problem, perceptions of risks/opportunities as well as the envisioning of alternate institutional systems. Persistent and strategic effort at building connections changes local improvisation into a globally legitimate innovation.

Research limitations/implications

It indicates the value of using DAs for innovation studies especially epistemic locus, enactment and connections in understanding knowledge generation and innovation.

Practical implications

Innovation in Global South can be encouraged by giving more space to the innovator to attempt or experiment. More conscious conversation of epistemic locus of the researcher could help.

Social implications

Countries have to move beyond a mere technological imitation to include discussions on epistemic imitation. Epistemic imitation prevents one from seeing what one has and one only looks at conditions from the eyes of the dominator.

Originality/value

This study documents the development of an innovation from an Indian epistemic locus which differs from a western epistemic locus and the impact this has on an innovation.

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

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