Search results

1 – 10 of 191
To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 7 October 2019

This chapter makes a case for a decolonial, intersectional approach to narrative criminology. It argues that in growing contexts of deepening inequalities, research…

Abstract

This chapter makes a case for a decolonial, intersectional approach to narrative criminology. It argues that in growing contexts of deepening inequalities, research approaches that humanise people on the margins and that explicitly centre questions of social justice are ever more urgent. This chapter explicates a decolonial, intersectional narrative analysis, working with the data generated in interviews with women sex workers on their experiences of violence outlining how a decolonial, intersectional, narrative analysis may be accomplished to analyse the intersections of power at material, representational and structural levels. The chapter illustrates the importance of an intersectional feminist lens for amplifying the complexity of women sex workers' experiences of gendered violence and for understanding the multiple forms of material, symbolic and institutionalised subordination they experience in increasingly unequal and oppressive contexts. It ends by considering the contributions decolonial, intersectional feminist work can offer narrative criminology, especially the emerging field of narrative victimology.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 18 August 2014

Alex Faria, Sergio Wanderley, Yuna Reis and Ana Celano

We engage in a particular way the Anglo-American claim that a more performative Critical Management Studies (CMS) is needed to foster transformations in the “world out…

Abstract

Purpose

We engage in a particular way the Anglo-American claim that a more performative Critical Management Studies (CMS) is needed to foster transformations in the “world out there” by putting into practice our learnings from a case study at Galpão Aplauso (GA), an NGO located in Brazil, which main role is to (re)socialize dispossessed youngsters through a critical methodology informed by anthropophagy.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing upon an engaged investigation informed by both performative CMS and decoloniality from Latin America we embody a performative CMS “otherwise.” Through the engagement with GA, and corresponding disengagement with our institutions, we propose decolonial anthropophagy as a way to move beyond Eurocentric critiques of Eurocentrism and decolonial work monopolized by full-time academics.

Findings

From a decolonial perspective it is shown that the performative turn within CMS could be used as a way of bringing “critical development” and “critical knowledge” to “subalterns” and the “rest of the world” from a perspective of coloniality. An anthropofagic perspective on decoloniality and critique shows that “subalterns” have much to teach us and our institutions and represents a way to decolonize theory-practice and academic-nonacademic divides.

Originality/value

The critical-decolonial anthropophagic perspective put forward in this chapter may represent an opportunity for CMS to move beyond much of its Eurocentric traditions, thus enlarging its geographic and cultural references. It may offer CMS an alternative critical performativity concept from the South which enables CMS to become a “re/disconnector,” instead of a connector, between the Euro-American traditions and the “rest of the world,” and making things happen “otherwise.”

Details

Getting Things Done
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-954-6

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 21 November 2019

Amber Murrey

Oriented to ongoing student and university momentums for decolonial futures, the purpose of this paper is to interrogate the role and status of mainstream international…

Abstract

Purpose

Oriented to ongoing student and university momentums for decolonial futures, the purpose of this paper is to interrogate the role and status of mainstream international development curricula and pedagogies by critiquing two absences in the sub-discipline’s teaching formulae: appropriations and assassinations.

Design/methodology/approach

The author draws from a decade of research on oil extraction in Central Africa, including ethnographic work with two communities in Cameroon along the Chad–Cameroon Oil Pipeline; four years of research (interview-based and unofficial or grey materials) on the 1983 August Revolution in Burkina Faso and assassination of Thomas Sankara; and five years of experience teaching international development in North America, Western Europe and North and Eastern Africa.

Findings

Through a critical synthesis of political and rhetorical practices that are often considered in isolation (i.e. political assassinations and corporate appropriation of Indigenous knowledges), the author makes the case for what the author calls pedagogical disobedience: an anticipatory decolonial development curricula and praxis that is attentive to the simultaneity of violence and misappropriation within colonial operations of power (i.e. “coloniality of power” or “coloniality”).

Originality/value

This paper contributes to debates within international development about the future of the discipline given its neo-colonial and colonial constitutions and functions with a grounded attention to how this opens up possibilities for teaching praxis and scholarship in action.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 46 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 30 September 2019

Annette Krauss

This paper aims to report on findings and methodological approaches of the artistic project “Sites for Unlearning (Art Organization)” in collaboration with the Team at…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to report on findings and methodological approaches of the artistic project “Sites for Unlearning (Art Organization)” in collaboration with the Team at Casco at Institute: Working for the Commons, Utrecht/NL, through which processes of unlearning are tested against the backdrop of established institutional structures. This paper constitutes a transdisciplinary contribution to the discourse, exploring its relationship with organizational unlearning, organizational change and feminist, decolonial trajectories.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper proposes a feminist, decolonial, arts-based approach to discuss “unlearning institutional habits” by means of the long-term project – Sites for Unlearning (Art Organization). This complements the organizational unlearning literature with an arts-based approach, which draws on alternative education and feminist and decolonial literature. This paper responds to the call of this special and introduces a new perspective to the discourse.

Findings

This paper gives insights into and elaborates on the findings of the artistic project “Site for Unlearning (Art Organization)” through which processes of unlearning are tested against the backdrop of institutional structures.

Originality/value

This methodology puts in evidence that there are two major areas of concern for those who desire to break established structures in contemporary life increasingly defined by economic, socio-political and ecological pressures – institution on the one hand and learning on the other; the artistic project Sites for Unlearning attempts to challenge both. It builds on the insights and energies developed in and around the studies on unlearning in the fields of alternative education and feminist and decolonial theory and connects them with organizational learning, knowledge management and theories of transformation (Andreotti, 2011; Spivak, 1993; Tlostanova and Mignolo, 2012).

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 25 November 2019

Bjorn H. Nordtveit and Fadia Nordtveit

The implications and impacts of the educational intelligent economy from the vantage point of digital frontierism is explored using a decolonial framework, with a specific…

Abstract

The implications and impacts of the educational intelligent economy from the vantage point of digital frontierism is explored using a decolonial framework, with a specific focus on Big Data and data sharing in Comparative and International Education (CIE). Recent debates are reviewed about CIE’s past histories and its current directions to tease out their implications for data sharing. The authors demonstrate how data sharing continues to reinforce imperialism through control, dissemination, and application of data, and how electronic and digital colonialism preserve current intellectual and structural hegemonies. Then, we give an example of how donors and funding agencies, including the National Science Foundation, engage in neoliberal scientism and control of data, and how it affects the future of social sciences, including CIE. Our inquiry is at the intersections of economic intelligence and educational intelligence in a rapidly evolving technocentric, data-dominated, and networked economy. The authors demonstrate how educational intelligence in the global economy may exacerbate the asymmetric access to data between the global North and the South, as educational data are increasingly becoming global commodities to be traded between various public and private actors. Finally, the authors argue that decolonial participatory research designs that aim at positive, sustained transformations, as opposed to the stagnancy of Big Data and data mining, should be used to address the problems inherent to the Educational Intelligent Economy.

Details

The Educational Intelligent Economy: Big Data, Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning and the Internet of Things in Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-853-4

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 17 July 2020

Johannes M. Waldmueller

The geopolitical relevance of the region with regard to clandestine and market interests exerting ecological pressures over mangroves and artisanal fishing thus raises…

Abstract

Purpose

The geopolitical relevance of the region with regard to clandestine and market interests exerting ecological pressures over mangroves and artisanal fishing thus raises awareness with regard to the local disaster's potentially global dimension. Delinking thus suggests divergent visibilization strategies regarding the narratives and framings of the region.

Design/methodology/approach

Reflecting on previous ethnographic and quantitative research on the impacted livelihoods in the Canton of Muisne (Ecuador) in the aftermath of the earthquake of April 2016, this article explores some disruptive dimensions of the permanent disaster in the predominantly black Ecuadorian–Colombian border region.

Findings

By drawing on decolonial theory, as well as by shifting between a mainstream narrative of the disaster, on the one hand, and a “delinked narrative,” on the other, this article is in line with more recent publications arguing that neither local and time bound accounts of vulnerability, ethnicity and (in)visibility, nor mainstream depictions of a “lack of development” are able to generate the required knowledge to disrupt from this permanently neglected disaster.

Originality/value

In order to understand the disaster beyond its ostensibly local dimension, economic, environmental, as well as the geopolitical considerations are suggested, resulting in a different framing of the disaster.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 29 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 June 2010

Alex Faria, Eduardo Ibarra‐Colado and Ana Guedes

This paper aims to problematize the lack of different worldviews on international management (IM), and the virtual silence in Latin America regarding this field within the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to problematize the lack of different worldviews on international management (IM), and the virtual silence in Latin America regarding this field within the context of the ongoing crisis of neoliberal policies and discourse.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper embraces a decolonial Latin American perspective based on developments in international relations (IR). A major reason for this dialogue is that critical debates within IR have been overlooked by both mainstream and critical literature on management, despite the intrinsic relation between decolonial arguments and IR and the increasing importance of management, and IM, within the realm of international relations to both “centers” and “peripheries”.

Findings

The interdisciplinary dialogue put forward in this paper goes beyond those borders established by the “center” and imposed on subalterns. Accordingly then, this might be taken as a particular way of putting into practice a decolonial Latin American perspective. It aims to go beyond some “universal” standpoint as the IR literature shows that the universal standpoint in relation to the “peripheries” tends to be mobilized by the “centers”. It is understood that the construction of a critical Latin American perspective is a way of creating better conditions for “cross‐cultural encounters” not only in global terms, but also within Latin America.

Practical implications

Rethinking IM through a critical perspective inspired by IR has implications for teaching, research and other types of practice in both IM and IR in Latin America.

Originality/value

The paper aims to foster a Latin American perspective rather than a general perspective. Instead of merely disengaging the “center”, the paper embraces, from a critical position inspired by IR, the current argument in US literature that the core of IM comprises a strong commitment to cross‐cultural issues, diversity, and eclecticism.

Details

Critical perspectives on international business, vol. 6 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-2043

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 17 September 2019

Michael Elliott

The purpose of this paper is to consider how practices of critical theorising directed towards present dilemmas of neoliberalisation might inadvertently participate in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider how practices of critical theorising directed towards present dilemmas of neoliberalisation might inadvertently participate in the reproduction of colonial power.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper adopts a critical theoretical approach, focussing on Wendy Brown’s recent work on neoliberalism in particular.

Findings

The paper argues that an alignment with colonial power is evident at a methodological level in Brown’s critique of neoliberalism and that this offers indication of how critical theorising in general might begin to reorient itself in ways that better ally it with the creation/promotion of decolonial possibility in contemporary contexts.

Originality/value

The paper makes original contribution to understanding of how western critical theorising actively participates in the reproduction of colonial power. Its value lies partly in demonstrating how this occurs in Brown’s specific case, and partly in suggesting correctives of more general applicability.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 46 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 10 October 2019

David Rodríguez Goyes

In this chapter, I present the methodological pillar of a Southern green criminology. It may prove useful for researchers and students interested in developing a science…

Abstract

Summary

In this chapter, I present the methodological pillar of a Southern green criminology. It may prove useful for researchers and students interested in developing a science to end the ecological discrimination. My main concern in presenting this method is to upset the colonialist logic that sustains culturism and speciesism. In my ‘stereoscope’ of ecological discrimination, I aim to uncover harmful environmental practices that have a global reach and disproportionately affect the geographical and metaphorical Souths.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 5 September 2013

Alex Faria

Drawing upon the concepts of transmodernity, pluriversality and border thinking the author stands in a more practical fashion for the co-creation of an-other performative…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing upon the concepts of transmodernity, pluriversality and border thinking the author stands in a more practical fashion for the co-creation of an-other performative CMS which fosters the decolonization of (critical) management studies – as a way to contribute “to concretely changing the world(s) for the better” (as claimed by the organizers of the symposium “should critical management studies get anything done?” held at the Academy of Management Meeting in 2012 in Boston).

Methodology/approach

From a more practical and less opaque perspective on border thinking it is shown how and why border thinking can both enable and constrain critical scholars and people to move across the borders of the colonial difference and from Eurocentric modernity toward transmodern pluriversality.

Findings

The current performative turn of CMS fails to address the agency of critical knowledge as a potential reworking of Occidentalism which can be mobilized to “manage” the rise of alternatives and knowledges from the rest of the world in general and from emerging economies in particular.

Originality/value of chapter

Border thinking as a crucial concept from the coloniality/modernity research program from Latin America is taken as an important contribution from the colonial difference to the co-creation of decolonial management studies (DMS), an-other performative CMS which fosters the construction of a world in which many worlds and knowledges can coexist as a way to change it for the better.

1 – 10 of 191