Search results

1 – 10 of over 8000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 July 2010

Elaine Ménard

This paper seeks to examine image retrieval within two different contexts: a monolingual context where the language of the query is the same as the indexing language and a…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to examine image retrieval within two different contexts: a monolingual context where the language of the query is the same as the indexing language and a multilingual context where the language of the query is different from the indexing language. The study also aims to compare two different approaches for the indexing of ordinary images representing common objects: traditional image indexing with the use of a controlled vocabulary and free image indexing using uncontrolled vocabulary.

Design/methodology/approach

This research uses three data collection methods. An analysis of the indexing terms was employed in order to examine the multiplicity of term types assigned to images. A simulation of the retrieval process involving a set of 30 images was performed with 60 participants. The quantification of the retrieval performance of each indexing approach was based on the usability measures, that is, effectiveness, efficiency and satisfaction of the user. Finally, a questionnaire was used to gather information on searcher satisfaction during and after the retrieval process.

Findings

The results of this research are twofold. The analysis of indexing terms associated with all the 3,950 images provides a comprehensive description of the characteristics of the four non‐combined indexing forms used for the study. Also, the retrieval simulation results offers information about the relative performance of the six indexing forms (combined and non‐combined) in terms of their effectiveness, efficiency (temporal and human) and the image searcher's satisfaction.

Originality/value

The findings of the study suggest that, in the near future, the information systems could benefit from allowing an increased coexistence of controlled vocabularies and uncontrolled vocabularies, resulting from collaborative image tagging, for example, and giving the users the possibility to dynamically participate in the image‐indexing process, in a more user‐centred way.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 62 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 November 2015

Mari Vállez, Rafael Pedraza-Jiménez, Lluís Codina, Saúl Blanco and Cristòfol Rovira

Controlled vocabularies play an important role in information retrieval. Numerous studies have shown that conceptual searches based on vocabularies are more effective than…

Abstract

Purpose

Controlled vocabularies play an important role in information retrieval. Numerous studies have shown that conceptual searches based on vocabularies are more effective than keyword searches, at least in certain contexts. Consequently, new ways must be found to improve controlled vocabularies. The purpose of this paper is to present a semi-automatic model for updating controlled vocabularies through the use of a text corpus and the analysis of query logs.

Design/methodology/approach

An experimental development is presented in which, first, the suitability of a controlled vocabulary to a text corpus is examined. The keywords entered by users to access the text corpus are then compared with the descriptors used to index it. Finally, both the query logs and text corpus are processed to obtain a set of candidate terms to update the controlled vocabulary.

Findings

This paper describes a model applicable both in the context of the text corpus of an online academic journal and to repositories and intranets. The model is able to: first, identify the queries that led users from a search engine to a relevant document; and second, process these queries to identify candidate terms for inclusion in a controlled vocabulary.

Research limitations/implications

Ideally, the model should be used in controlled web environments, such as repositories, intranets or academic journals.

Social implications

The proposed model directly improves the indexing process by facilitating the maintenance and updating of controlled vocabularies. It so doing, it helps to optimise access to information.

Originality/value

The proposed model takes into account the perspective of users by mining queries in order to propose candidate terms for inclusion in a controlled vocabulary.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 39 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 July 2010

Brian Matthews, Catherine Jones, Bartłomiej Puzoń, Jim Moon, Douglas Tudhope, Koraljka Golub and Marianne Lykke Nielsen

Traditional subject indexing and classification are considered infeasible in many digital collections. This paper seeks to investigate ways of enhancing social tagging via…

Abstract

Purpose

Traditional subject indexing and classification are considered infeasible in many digital collections. This paper seeks to investigate ways of enhancing social tagging via knowledge organization systems, with a view to improving the quality of tags for increased information discovery and retrieval performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Enhanced tagging interfaces were developed for exemplar online repositories, and trials were undertaken with author and reader groups to evaluate the effectiveness of tagging augmented with control vocabulary for subject indexing of papers in online repositories.

Findings

The results showed that using a knowledge organisation system to augment tagging does appear to increase the effectiveness of non‐specialist users (that is, without information science training) in subject indexing.

Research limitations/implications

While limited by the size and scope of the trials undertaken, these results do point to the usefulness of a mixed approach in supporting the subject indexing of online resources.

Originality/value

The value of this work is as a guide to future developments in the practical support for resource indexing in online repositories.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 62 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 1983

MaryEllen Sievert and Bert R. Boyce

The traditional role of the controlled vocabulary has been to bring together items scattered by a multiplicity of natural language terms. Therefore, it was considered a…

Abstract

The traditional role of the controlled vocabulary has been to bring together items scattered by a multiplicity of natural language terms. Therefore, it was considered a recall device. The file structure of current online structure systems now leads to the use of such vocabularies as a precision device. Because of the levels of specificity in the controlled vocabulary, the search for broader concepts means several terms may be ncessary. In this case, the file structure of the retrieval systems requires that for efficient searching the entry points be analyzed and minimized. Complete, rather than partial, entry of controlled terms appears to be inefficient.

Details

Online Review, vol. 7 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-314X

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 September 2005

Michelle Dalmau, Randall Floyd, Dazhi Jiao and Jenn Riley

Seeks to share with digital library practitioners the development process of an online image collection that integrates the syndetic structure of a controlled vocabulary

Abstract

Purpose

Seeks to share with digital library practitioners the development process of an online image collection that integrates the syndetic structure of a controlled vocabulary to improve end‐user search and browse functionality.

Design/methodology/approach

Surveys controlled vocabulary structures and their utility for catalogers and end‐users. Reviews research literature and usability findings that informed the specifications for integration of the controlled vocabulary structure into search and browse functionality. Discusses database functions facilitating query expansion using a controlled vocabulary structure, and web application handling of user queries and results display. Concludes with a discussion of open‐source alternatives and reuse of database and application components in other environments.

Findings

Affirms that structured forms of browse and search can be successfully integrated into digital collections to significantly improve the user's discovery experience. Establishes ways in which the technologies used in implementing enhanced search and browse functionality can be abstracted to work in other digital collection environments.

Originality/value

Significant amounts of research on integrating thesauri structures into search and browse functionalities exist, but examples of online resources that have implemented this approach are few in comparison. The online image collection surveyed in this paper can serve as a model to other designers of digital library resources for integrating controlled vocabularies and metadata structures into more dynamic search and browse functionality for end‐users.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 30 August 2014

Yunseon Choi

This chapter aims to discuss the issues associated with social indexing as a solution to the challenges of current information organization systems by investigating the…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter aims to discuss the issues associated with social indexing as a solution to the challenges of current information organization systems by investigating the quality and efficacy of social indexing.

Design/methodology/approach

The chapter focuses on the study which compared indexing similarity between two professional groups and also compared social tagging and professional indexing. The study employed the method of the modified vector-based Indexing Consistency Density (ICD) with three different similarity measures: cosine similarity, dot product similarity, and Euclidean distance metric.

Findings

The investigation of social indexing in comparison of professional indexing demonstrates that social tags are more accurate descriptions of resources and reflection of more current terminology than controlled vocabulary. Through the characteristics of social tagging discussed in this chapter, we have a clearer understanding of the extent to which social indexing can be used to replace and improve upon professional indexing.

Research limitations/implications

As investment in professionally developed web directories diminishes, it becomes even more critical to understand the characteristics of social tagging and to obtain benefit from it. In future research, the examination of subjective tags needs to be conducted. A survey or user study on tagging behavior also would help to extend understanding of social indexing practices.

Details

New Directions in Information Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-559-3

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2006

George Macgregor and Emma McCulloch

The purpose of the paper is to provide an overview of the collaborative tagging phenomenon and explore some of the reasons for its emergence.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to provide an overview of the collaborative tagging phenomenon and explore some of the reasons for its emergence.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews the related literature and discusses some of the problems associated with, and the potential of, collaborative tagging approaches for knowledge organisation and general resource discovery. A definition of controlled vocabularies is proposed and used to assess the efficacy of collaborative tagging. An exposition of the collaborative tagging model is provided and a review of the major contributions to the tagging literature is presented.

Findings

There are numerous difficulties with collaborative tagging systems (e.g. low precision, lack of collocation, etc.) that originate from the absence of properties that characterise controlled vocabularies. However, such systems can not be dismissed. Librarians and information professionals have lessons to learn from the interactive and social aspects exemplified by collaborative tagging systems, as well as their success in engaging users with information management. The future co‐existence of controlled vocabularies and collaborative tagging is predicted, with each appropriate for use within distinct information contexts: formal and informal.

Research limitations/implications

Librarians and information professional researchers should be playing a leading role in research aimed at assessing the efficacy of collaborative tagging in relation to information storage, organisation, and retrieval, and to influence the future development of collaborative tagging systems.

Practical implications

The paper indicates clear areas where digital libraries and repositories could innovate in order to better engage users with information.

Originality/value

At time of writing there were no literature reviews summarising the main contributions to the collaborative tagging research or debate.

Details

Library Review, vol. 55 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1965

MARJORIE R. HYSLOP

The ASM Information Retrieval System is currently in process of redesign to incorporate major refinements and improvements resulting from five years of operating…

Abstract

The ASM Information Retrieval System is currently in process of redesign to incorporate major refinements and improvements resulting from five years of operating experience as well as experience and research of others in the field. Principles and methodology underlying these changes are explored for various components of this system, principally vocabulary, links and roles, and computer hardware and programming. The major change is from semantic code to thesaurus as the system vocabulary, and the relative efficiencies and inherent capabilities of each are compared and related to the general principles of vocabulary control.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 18 September 2017

Scott Hanrath and Erik Radio

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the search behavior of institutional repository (IR) users in regard to subjects as a means of estimating the potential impact…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the search behavior of institutional repository (IR) users in regard to subjects as a means of estimating the potential impact of applying a controlled subject vocabulary to an IR.

Design/methodology/approach

Google Analytics data were used to record cases where users arrived at an IR item page from an external web search and subsequently downloaded content. Search queries were compared against the Faceted Application of Subject Terminology (FAST) schema to determine the topical nature of the queries. Queries were also compared against the item’s metadata values for title and subject using approximate string matching to determine the alignment of the queries with current metadata values.

Findings

A substantial portion of successful user search queries to an IR appear to be topical in nature. User search queries matched values from FAST at a higher rate than existing subject metadata. Increased attention to subject description in IR records may provide an opportunity to improve the search visibility of the content.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited to a particular IR. Data from Google Analytics does not provide comprehensive search query data.

Originality/value

The study presents a novel method for analyzing user search behavior to assist IR managers in determining whether to invest in applying controlled subject vocabularies to IR content.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Using Subject Headings for Online Retrieval: Theory, Practice and Potential
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-12221-570-4

1 – 10 of over 8000