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Article
Publication date: 2 November 2010

Li Baoku, Zhai Cuixia and Bao Weimin

This paper aims to determine Chinese peasant consumers' decision‐making styles.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to determine Chinese peasant consumers' decision‐making styles.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reflects on the psychological orientation and decision‐making styles of peasants' purchase of durable appliances. This has the dual character of purchase behavior by the study on factor analysis from a view of peasants' consumption psychology. The consumer style inventory (CSI) was administered in January 2009 to 5,827 peasants in 656 villages in 14 provinces which were selected randomly in China. Both an exploratory factor analysis and a confirmatory factor analysis are adopted to validate the CSI inventory. This results in a 25‐item and eight‐factor solution.

Findings

Findings indicate that three consumer segments are formed: confused by over choice peasant consumer; fashion and impulsive peasant consumer; and perfect peasant consumer. The income effect on a farmer's purchasing has a threshold, while income does not reach the limit, income does not have an obvious effect on the decision‐making styles of peasants' purchasing on durable appliances, the category of consumer styles depends on the “individual” factor of peasants' consumption psychology, and their consumption behavior characteristics depend on the grade of psychological orientation and decision‐making styles of the consumer.

Practical implications

The marketing mix of an enterprise should recognize the potential differences of psychology of the peasant consumer. Enterprises should adopt positive marketing strategies in pricing to induce and inspire consumer motivation and behavior, so that enterprises can positively interact with rural consumers and achieve optimal allocation of marketing resources.

Originality/value

This paper decribes the decision‐making styles of Chinese peasant consumers based on their purchasing behavior with regard to consumer and consumption psychology. The effect of annual average income and income source of the family on the consumers' decision‐making styles is not obvious, but the number of people in a family has some effect on consumers' decision‐making styles.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 27 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 25 January 2013

Steven Lysonski and Srinivas Durvasula

India has undergone dramatic change in its retail markets since economic liberalization in 1992. The authors aim to use the framework of consumer decision making styles to…

Abstract

Purpose

India has undergone dramatic change in its retail markets since economic liberalization in 1992. The authors aim to use the framework of consumer decision making styles to investigate longitudinally how these styles have changed from 1994 to 2009. They also conducted a cross-sectional analysis of the 2009 data to determine whether decision making styles are shaped by psychological variables: perceived time pressure, shopping opinion leadership, shopping self-confidence, consumer susceptibility to interpersonal influence, and materialism.

Design/methodology/approach

The eight different consumer decision making styles were measured with instrument by Sproles and Kendall. The psychological variables were measured with established instruments with adequate reliabilities. The survey was administered to young adults. The Indian samples from 1994 and 2009 were matched allowing for comparisons.

Findings

The longitudinal analysis showed that four of the eight decision making styles changed statistically between 1994 and 2009; there were increases for brand consciousness, novelty-fashion consciousness, and impulsive-careless shopping while perfectionist-quality consciousness decreased. The cross sectional analysis of the psychological variables showed that perceived time pressure had minimal impact while shopping opinion leadership and shopping self confidence had a major impact. Materialism and consumer susceptibility to interpersonal influence had a moderate impact.

Research limitations/implications

The authors used an urban sample; a rural sample would also be useful. Future research could examine other emerging markets such as Brazil and Vietnam to identify the impact of the psychological variables on decision making styles in those countries.

Practical implications

The study shows that decision making styles do change as an emerging economy becomes more developed. The study also shows that psychological variables can explain some of the differences in decision making styles among consumers. Retailers and marketers can use this information to be more strategic in the way they develop their planning.

Social implications

Changes in decision making styles show that consumers are now more brand and fashion conscious while being more impulsive and careless in their shopping. These changes may signal that Indians are becoming more materialistic and more focused on brands and fashion which can lead to excessive buying and debt.

Originality/value

The paper offers a longitudinal view of changes in decision making and a cross sectional analysis of how psychological variables affect decision making styles. This study focuses on issues not presently discussed in the literature.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 16 August 2013

Chuan Sun, Song Su and Jinsong Huang

Previous research has generally assumed that a homogeneous cultural value exists within a given country. This research aims to identify the regional differences in…

Abstract

Purpose

Previous research has generally assumed that a homogeneous cultural value exists within a given country. This research aims to identify the regional differences in cultural value based on an urbanization dimension in China, which generate diversity with regard to perceived value and consumer decision‐making styles.

Design/methodology/approach

A large‐scale questionnaire was administered to freshmen from major colleges and universities across China to measure cultural value, perceived value, and consumer decision‐making style. The data were analyzed with a multi‐group structural equation model and a stepwise discrimination test.

Findings

Results demonstrated significant differences in cultural value, perceived value and consumer decision‐making style among regions with different degrees of urbanization and revealed antecedents and formation of the mechanism of decision‐making style.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should explore more antecedents that influence consumer decision‐making styles and other market dimensions other than urbanization.

Practical implications

The research might provide prominent guidelines for marketers to understand Chinese consumers. Specifically, in regions with different degrees of urbanization, marketers should develop differential strategies to exploit the market given the distinctions in cultural value, perceived value and consumer decision‐making styles.

Originality/value

This study is the first to build a theoretical relational model of cultural value, perceived value and consumer decision‐making styles. And this model revealed the antecedents and formation of the mechanism of decision‐making style.

Details

Nankai Business Review International, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8749

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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Sunhee Seo and Sunjin Moon

The purpose of this study is to segment consumers according to their decision-making styles in the context of social commerce. Additionally, the differences among consumer

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to segment consumers according to their decision-making styles in the context of social commerce. Additionally, the differences among consumer segments in consumer innovativeness, perceived risk, satisfaction and demographic characteristics are evaluated.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 384 respondents who shopped for restaurant deals through social commerce participated in this study through an online survey. Two-step cluster analyses were used to segment social commerce consumers into groups, using their decision-making styles.

Findings

The results showed three types of social commerce consumers of restaurant deals: innovative brand-preferring consumers; realistic consumers; and passive consumers. Innovative brand-preferring consumers chose specific brands and showed the most innovativeness, while realistic consumers and passive consumers were price-conscious and far more cautious in purchasing restaurant deals using social commerce. Passive consumers were, in addition, confused by overchoice. All three consumer groups perceived higher risks to privacy in purchases using social commerce. Passive consumers were especially aware of the risk, while the innovative brand-preferring consumers and the realistic consumers were less concerned about risk. Consumers were especially likely to perceive economic risk, performance risk, social risk, psychological risk, privacy risk and time risk. Innovative brand-preferring consumers were more likely to be innovative and showed a higher level of satisfaction, while passive consumers showed the lowest satisfaction and the least innovativeness.

Research limitations/implications

This study provides additional insights on consumer decision-making styles in the context of social commerce in Korea.

Practical implications

Consumer decision-making styles can help restaurant managers to develop deals tailored to specific types of consumers, as well as create customized products and services.

Originality/value

This study is one of the very few attempts to investigate consumer decision-making styles in social commerce for restaurant deals, so it contributes to the literature on social commerce in the hospitality industry. This study shows that consumer decision-making styles are important in understanding the behavior of social commerce consumers.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 28 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 21 October 2013

Tahmid Nayeem and Riza Casidy

The purpose of this paper is to discover the consumer decision-making style clusters within the context of automobile purchases in Australia. It also examines the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discover the consumer decision-making style clusters within the context of automobile purchases in Australia. It also examines the differences between consumer decision-making styles in terms of the importance given to external influences, such as importance of dealers, importance of friends/family members, number of cars test driven, time spent researching final decision and importance of information sources (e.g. internet, magazines, TV ads, word of mouth, etc.), prior to making their final purchase decision.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 209 respondents using self-administered questionnaires. Cluster analysis and ANOVA were employed to identify and analyse the differences between consumer decision-making style clusters. Consumer Styles Inventory (CSI; Sproles and Kendall, 1986) was used to measure respondents’ consumer decision-making styles in relation to automobile purchases.

Findings

Three clusters were identified from the analysis, namely “innovative informed”, “rational confused”, and “traditional habitual”. Significant differences were found between the clusters in terms of the average time they spent with each car dealer, the time they spent on researching final decision and the importance of consulting with family members prior to making their final purchase decision.

Practical implications

The paper found that some consumers rely heavily on friends/families and dealers as the most important sources of information. Other sources of information consumers use include television advertisements, newspapers, billboards and magazines. Based on the findings, marketers should focus on providing similar types of information/messages by using these above-mentioned sources when communicating with this type of consumers. Dealers could be trained to spend time explaining product features and benefits in full with these consumers and their friends and family members whom they are likely to bring along before making the final purchase decision.

Originality/value

The findings of this study have extended the knowledge by determining the impact of external influences on consumer decision-making styles using the CSI in context of specific product which is yet to be known in relation to Australian automobile consumers.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 31 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 23 March 2010

Hans Kasper, Josée Bloemer and Paul H. Driessen

The purpose of this paper is to provide insight into how consumers cope with confusion caused by overload in information and/or choice. The paper investigates whether…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide insight into how consumers cope with confusion caused by overload in information and/or choice. The paper investigates whether consumers who face different degrees of confusion use different coping strategies depending upon their decision‐making styles.

Design/methodology/approach

The Dutch mobile phone market is a typical example of a turbulent market, overloaded with information and/or choice, which creates consumer confusion. A survey was conducted among 203 mobile phone users, using valid and reliable multi‐item scales to measure consumer confusion, decision‐making styles and coping strategies. Cluster analysis and Mancova were used to provide insight into the results.

Findings

The paper finds that consumers of mobile phones can be characterized by combinations of decision‐making styles and find three clusters based on decision‐making styles: “price conscious and cautious” consumers, “brand‐loyal and quality‐driven” consumers, and “functionalist” consumers. Results show significant main effects of the degree of confusion and the decision‐making styles on the use of coping strategies as well as a significant interaction effect of these two. Higher levels of consumer confusion lead to an increased use of seven coping strategies: downsizing the consideration set; keeping status quo; reduced information search; search deferral; buying what others have bought; disengagement from decision; and decision delegation. “Price conscious and cautious” consumers engage less in downsizing the consideration set than the two other clusters, and are less inclined to keep the status quo as compared to “functionalist” consumers.

Originality/value

Because of the intangible and heterogeneous nature of services, knowledge about coping with confusion due to an overload in information and choice is especially important for service providers in their efforts to build and sustain strong relationships with consumers. Practical implications in terms of different approaches on how to cope with confused consumers are provided.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

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Article
Publication date: 9 July 2019

Subhro Sarkar, Arpita Khare and Amrut Sadachar

The purpose of this paper is to validate the consumer styles inventory (CSI) scale for understanding the decision-making styles of shopping app users. The validated scales…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to validate the consumer styles inventory (CSI) scale for understanding the decision-making styles of shopping app users. The validated scales are used to examine the relationship between consumersdecision-making styles and factors affecting the use of mobile shopping apps.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 428 valid responses are collected from the users of the five most popular shopping apps. The mobile shopping apps are selected based on a popularity study. Data are collected from mobile app shoppers through an online survey.

Findings

Findings reveal a new set of factors that can be used for understanding use of mobile shopping apps. Decision-making styles influence the adoption of mobile apps for shopping. Factors responsible for the adoption of mobile shopping apps such as usefulness and risk perceptions differ across consumers with different decision-making styles.

Practical implications

The findings would facilitate online retailers in building focused marketing strategies for segmenting and targeting the consumers having different decision-making styles.

Originality/value

The current research is the first of its kind to examine the applicability of the CSI scale in the context of mobile app shoppers in an emerging economy. The findings enrich the existing literature by providing empirical support to the relationship between decision-making styles and factors affecting adoption of shopping using mobile apps.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2015

John Bae, Doris Lu-Anderson, Junya Fujimoto and Andre Richelieu

Purchasing behaviors have been studied in various countries. Previous studies involving consumer decision-making styles for sport products have only been seen in one…

Abstract

Purpose

Purchasing behaviors have been studied in various countries. Previous studies involving consumer decision-making styles for sport products have only been seen in one country in order to either identify factors of Purchase Style Inventory for Sport Products (PSISP) or classify consumer shopping behaviors. Therefore, the purpose of this paper was to identify consumersdecision-making styles (shopping styles) for sport products from Japanese, Singaporean, and Taiwanese college-aged consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

The scale of PSISP was adapted to measure consumer decision-making styles (shopping styles) for sport products. This instrument is composed of 35 items under nine dimensions. CFA, 3 (Nationality) × 2 (Gender) MANOVA and ANOVA were employed.

Findings

According to the results of this study, there were significant different decision-making styles among three different countries in East Asia. Overall, Japanese male and female college-aged students exhibited higher brand consciousness than Singaporean and Taiwanese males and females.

Research limitations/implications

As consumers from different countries show different lifestyle, education, economic, religion, and culture, they might have their unique shopping styles. Therefore, the dimensions related to decision-making styles need to be explored, and the scale needs to be validated using a substantial sport industry sample in the future study.

Practical implications

This study helps East Asian advertisers or markets to rethink and develop appropriate marketing strategies as well as to understand the different decision-making styles of local consumers and better approach new and existing consumer markets.

Originality/value

This paper is important for international sports marketers to predict consumer shopping patterns and maintain proper inventory levels, particularly when marketing in global markets.

Details

Sport, Business and Management: An International Journal, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-678X

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Article
Publication date: 6 September 2011

Seyyed Ali Moosavi Kavkani, Seyedreza Seyedjavadain and Faraz Saadeghvaziri

The purpose of the paper is to define Iranian consumers' decision making styles.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to define Iranian consumers' decision making styles.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative, non‐experimental, and descriptive‐analytic survey design was used in this study. The questionnaire statements were adapted from the instrument used by Sproles and Kendall. Like the study of Sproles and Kendall, the sample under consideration was made up of students. A convenience sample was drawn from students of two large universities (Tehran University and Azad University). A total of 650 questionnaires were distributed, and 600 of them were returned.

Findings

The results identified seven decision‐making styles: perfectionism consciousness, novelty and fashion consciousness, recreational and hedonistic consciousness, confused by over choice, impulsiveness and carelessness, price and value consciousness, and brand loyalty.

Research limitations/implications

The limitation is that the sample used in this study was chosen from university students that may have resulted in sampling biases.

Originality/value

Considering previous studies showing that researchers have selected different populations and found different results. Also, it must be stressed that there is no research investigating Iranian consumer's decision making styles. Thus, this study added new empirical findings to the current body of knowledge through new evidences and also demonstrated new decision making style.

Details

Business Strategy Series, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-5637

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Article
Publication date: 8 July 2014

Ju-Young M. Kang, Kim K.P. Johnson and Juanjuan Wu

The purpose of this paper are to examine: first, whether the consumer style inventory (CSI) consumer decision-making styles were related to opinion seeking using…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper are to examine: first, whether the consumer style inventory (CSI) consumer decision-making styles were related to opinion seeking using electronic word of mouth (eWOM) in social networking sites (SNSs) and attitudes toward online social shopping using SNSs; and second, whether opinion seeking in SNSs and attitudes mediated the links between decision-making styles and intent to social shop online for apparel using SNSs.

Design/methodology/approach

The conceptual foundation was based on Engel, Kollat, and Blackwell's model. In total, 304 college students who are SNS users provided usable responses. Structural equation modeling was employed to test the proposed model and research hypotheses.

Findings

Among the CSI consumer decision-making styles, novelty/fashion consciousness decision-making style was the most important antecedent of opinion seeking using eWOM. The brand consciousness decision-making style was the most important antecedent of favorable attitudes. Novelty/fashion consciousness, brand consciousness, and price consciousness decision-making styles had indirect effects on intent to social shop online for apparel using SNS, mediated by both opinion seeking and favorable attitudes.

Originality/value

This study contributes to further theoretical understanding of the types of consumers that are drawn to eWOM and their online social shopping behaviors for apparel using SNSs. By identifying individual consumer characteristics, this study can provide retailers with an initial profile of consumers who shop apparel using SNSs. Retailers can use this information to further develop the design of their social shopping sites using SNSs to meet the needs of their customers.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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