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Book part
Publication date: 20 January 2014

Jorge F. B. Lengler, Carlos M. P. Sousa and Catarina Marques

Despite some attempts to integrate the market orientation construct into the international marketing area, most conceptual and empirical studies have been conducted in the…

Abstract

Despite some attempts to integrate the market orientation construct into the international marketing area, most conceptual and empirical studies have been conducted in the context of domestic operations. To address this gap we examine whether competitive intensity moderates the relationships among the components of market orientation and export performance. Data was used from 197 Brazilian export companies. Results suggest that interfunctional coordination enhances customer and competitor orientation. Moreover, customer orientation has no direct effect on export performance, while competitor orientation has a positive effect on firm’s international performance. Findings also indicate that competitive intensity moderates all the relationships tested in the model.

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International Marketing in Rapidly Changing Environments
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-896-9

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Book part
Publication date: 29 January 2018

Gábor Nagy, Carol M. Megehee and Arch G. Woodside

The study here responds to the view that the crucial problem in strategic management (research) is firm heterogeneity – why firms adopt different strategies and…

Abstract

The study here responds to the view that the crucial problem in strategic management (research) is firm heterogeneity – why firms adopt different strategies and structures, why heterogeneity persists, and why competitors perform differently. The present study applies complexity theory tenets and a “neo-configurational perspective” of Misangyi et al. (2016) in proposing complex antecedent conditions affecting complex outcome conditions. Rather than examining variable directional relationships using null hypotheses statistical tests, the study examines case-based conditions using somewhat precise outcome tests (SPOT). The complex outcome conditions include firms with high financial performances in declining markets and firms with low financial performances in growing markets – the study focuses on seemingly paradoxical outcomes. The study here examines firm strategies and outcomes for separate samples of cross-sectional data of manufacturing firms with headquarters in one of two nations: Finland (n = 820) and Hungary (n = 300). The study includes examining the predictive validities of the models. The study contributes conceptual advances of complex firm orientation configurations and complex firm performance capabilities configurations as mediating conditions between firmographics, firm resources, and the two final complex outcome conditions (high performance in declining markets and low performance in growing markets). The study contributes by showing how fuzzy-logic computing with words (Zadeh, 1966) advances strategic management research toward achieving requisite variety to overcome the theory-analytic mismatch pervasive currently in the discipline (Fiss, 2007, 2011) – thus, this study is a useful step toward solving the crucial problem of how to explain firm heterogeneity.

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Improving the Marriage of Modeling and Theory for Accurate Forecasts of Outcomes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-122-7

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Article
Publication date: 16 August 2013

Stanley Kam Sing Wong and Canon Tong

The question of R&D and marketing cooperation (RMC) in new product development (NPD) is of increasing relevance. However, it is unclear whether RMC really leads to new…

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1227

Abstract

Purpose

The question of R&D and marketing cooperation (RMC) in new product development (NPD) is of increasing relevance. However, it is unclear whether RMC really leads to new product success (NPS) and whether and to what extent other elements of market orientation (MO) impact on NPS and the RMC‐NPS relationship. The purpose of this paper is to shed light on this important question and to verify the existence and degree of direct and indirect causalities between the core elements of MO and NPS.

Design/methodology/approach

An empirical study has been carried out to test the conceptual framework and the five hypotheses developed based on seminal literature. The conceptual framework and hypotheses are tested using both SEM and regression methods with survey data from 217 respondents from the electronics industry in China.

Findings

The results demonstrate that RMC has a significant and positive influence on NPS. The results on customer orientation support previous findings and the research offers interesting insights with respect to the role of customer orientation in NPD. While results from SEM analysis reject the hypothesized direct effect of competitor orientation on NPS and the predicted mediating effect of competitor orientation on the RMC‐NPS link, results from regression analysis, however, suggest otherwise.

Practical implications

The results of the research help to assure practitioners of the primacy role of RMC in NPD and the positive effects of customer orientation on NPS. Such findings should enable NPD team leaders to make best possible decisions in allocating resources among competing priorities. Divergent results on the effects of competitor orientation on NPS and the RMC‐NPS link remind practitioners that knowing the assumptions behind an analysis is actually a precondition for correctly assessing and implementing the results of any research.

Originality/value

Results of the study will fill a research gap in marketing studies which have largely neglected the interplay among the three core elements of MO and the mediating effects, individual and combined, of customer and competitor orientations on the RMC‐NPS link. Divergent findings derived from the use of two different analysis tools yield new insights to both academics and practitioners and may warrant further investigation.

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Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 28 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 6 September 2013

Jorge Francisco Lengler, Carlos M.P. Sousa and Catarina Marques

Despite some attempts to integrate the market orientation construct into the international marketing area, most conceptual and empirical studies have been conducted in the…

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1657

Abstract

Purpose

Despite some attempts to integrate the market orientation construct into the international marketing area, most conceptual and empirical studies have been conducted in the context of domestic operations. In addition, few studies have examined the quadratic effects of customer and competitor orientation on export performance. To address this gap in the literature we test a model that examines whether customer and competitor orientation have linear or quadratic relationships with export performance. We also investigate if competitive intensity moderates the linear and quadratic relationships between customer and competitor orientation and export profit.

Design/methodology/approach

The hypotheses are tested using survey data collected from 197 Brazilian export firms. Structural equation modeling was conducted to test the hypothesized relationships and to validate the proposed conceptual model.

Findings

Empirical evidence reveals that, while customer orientation has a U‐shaped relationship with export sales, the competitor orientation–export profit relationship is linear. Our results also provide evidence that the positive quadratic relationship between customer orientation and export profit is mediated by export sales. Contrary to expectations, the results also indicate that none of the linear or quadratic relationships investigated in the model are moderated by competitive intensity.

Originality/value

We test a model in an export context that examines whether the relationships between the separate components of market orientation and export performance are linear or quadratic. We also contribute to the literature by examining these relationships in the context of a developing country, namely Brazil.

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International Marketing Review, vol. 30 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article
Publication date: 29 May 2009

Hans Eibe Sørensen

This paper aims to investigate whether it is meaningful to decompose market orientation into customer orientation and competitor orientation, and what possible…

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8906

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate whether it is meaningful to decompose market orientation into customer orientation and competitor orientation, and what possible implications this decomposition may have for researchers and business practitioners.

Design/methodology/approach

Through a review of existing market orientation research, two of its salient dimensions, customer orientation and competitor orientation, are theoretically investigated. Then, two symmetric component measures are developed and tested on 308 manufacturing firms in a cross‐sectional questionnaire survey, supplemented with census data.

Findings

Empirical evidence reveals that, while competitor orientation is positively related to a firm's market share, a customer orientation is detrimental to a firm's return on assets for firms in less competitive environments.

Research limitations/implications

The study advocates moving beyond “global” measures of market orientation and focusing on symmetric component measures of customer orientation and competitor orientation when investigating a firm's performance differentials. The study's cross‐sectional setting limits inference about causality among the constructs.

Practical implications

Customer versus competitor orientation appears to be contingent on a firm's competitive environment, which indicates that market orientation and its components are not necessarily equally relevant for firms with different strategies and in different environments.

Originality/value

The paper introduces and empirically tests two novel symmetric component measures of customer orientation and competitor orientation. Academicians are provided with insights with respect to the content and symmetry of component measures of the market orientation construct and their relation to firm performance. Furthermore, business practitioners are given a more solid foundation for better allocation of resources to their customer and competitor‐oriented activities.

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European Journal of Marketing, vol. 43 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2015

Chiquan Guo and Yong Wang

This paper aims to examine how the three market orientation components (customer orientation, competitor orientation and interfunctional coordination) influence industrial…

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2916

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine how the three market orientation components (customer orientation, competitor orientation and interfunctional coordination) influence industrial manufacturers’ customer relationship management outcomes in a business-to-business (B2B) context.

Design/methodology/approach

In linking market orientation components and their relationship outcomes, the authors examined the moderating effect of interfunctional coordination. The model was tested using data collected from 279 manufacturing firms in the USA.

Findings

While customer orientation and competitor orientation both influence customer relationship outcomes, interfunctional coordination does not. However, interfunctional coordination lessens the positive relationships between customer orientation and customer retention as well as between competitor orientation and customer satisfaction. Although competitor orientation has a slightly stronger impact on customer satisfaction than customer orientation does, it only has an indirect relationship with customer retention through customer satisfaction.

Originality/value

The findings illustrated the effects of the three components of market orientation on customer relationship outcomes within manufacturing-centered firms, and provided managerial implications to industrial manufacturers on market orientation implementation strategies in regard to successful B2B customer relationship management.

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Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 20 January 2012

Stanley Kam Sing Wong and Canon Tong

This research seeks to investigate key determinants of new product success (NPS) from the perspective of new product development (NPD) team leaders in the electronics…

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3942

Abstract

Purpose

This research seeks to investigate key determinants of new product success (NPS) from the perspective of new product development (NPD) team leaders in the electronics industry in China. A model is proposed investigating the interplay among elements of market orientation and the moderating effects of customer and competitor orientations on the relationship between R&D‐Marketing cooperation and NPS.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 217 respondents to an online questionnaire that had been sent to 3,000 potential participants randomly selected from electronics firms across China. Regression analysis was used to analyse the data.

Findings

Results from the research support the hypotheses that NPS is driven by R&D‐Marketing cooperation, customer and competitor orientations. Also, the association between R&D‐Marketing cooperation and NPS is moderated by customer and competitor orientations.

Practical implications

This research confirms the positive role that R&D‐Marketing cooperation plays in NPS and the moderating effects of customer and competitor orientations on the association between R&D‐Marketing cooperation and NPS. The findings are of relevance to management practitioners as developing successful new products has become an ever more pressing issue in the wake of rising labour cost and increasing market competition.

Originality/value

Previous NPD literature has focused primarily on NPD activities in Western and developed countries. This research fills the research gap by identifying the empirical links between R&D‐Marketing cooperation and NPS. It is the first to examine the moderating effects of customer and competitor orientations in the relationship between R&D‐Marketing cooperation and NPS of electronics firms in China.

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European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2016

Alexander Newman, Daniel Prajogo and Andrew Atherton

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of market orientation on exploratory and exploitative innovation, and the moderating effects of family ownership on…

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1293

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of market orientation on exploratory and exploitative innovation, and the moderating effects of family ownership on these relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

This study utilizes multi-group path analysis and confirmatory factor analysis in LISREL on data from 228 firms in the Australian service sector.

Findings

This study establishes that both customer and competitor innovation are positively related to exploitative and exploratory innovation. However, customer orientation does not lead to significantly stronger effects on exploitative innovation than on exploratory innovation, and competitor orientation does not lead to significantly stronger effects on exploratory innovation than on exploitative innovation. In addition, the study found that the relationship between customer orientation and exploratory innovation was stronger for family firms, while the relationships between competitor orientation and both exploratory and exploitative innovation were stronger for non-family firms.

Research limitations/implications

The cross-sectional design is one weakness of this study. In addition, as firms in the present study came from the service sector the generalizability of the findings to other sectors of the economy need to be determined.

Practical implications

These findings of this study highlight the need for managers to build a strong market orientation in order to promote innovation, and consider the effects of ownership structure on innovation strategies.

Originality/value

This study is the first to measure the relative influence of customer and competitor orientation on a firm’s use of exploitative and exploratory innovation strategies.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

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Article
Publication date: 22 July 2020

Hakan Aydin

This study aims to examine the relationship between market orientation and product innovation and the mediating role of technological capability in this relationship. It…

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1686

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the relationship between market orientation and product innovation and the mediating role of technological capability in this relationship. It also aims to examine the effect of market orientation on product innovation within the framework of technological intensity classification of the fields of business activity.

Design/methodology/approach

The research data were obtained from 186 senior and mid-level managers of 627 manufacturing firms that are widely considered to be innovative, and that are ranked among Turkey's largest 1,000 manufacturing firms (ISO 1000). The data were analyzed using partial least squares structural equation modeling.

Findings

Customer orientation and interfunctional coordination, two distinct dimensions of market orientation, had positive effects on product innovation. Technological capability played a mediating role in the effect of customer orientation and interfunctional coordination on product innovation. In addition, interfunctional coordination positively affected product innovation in firms with low technological intensity, whereas customer orientation positively affected product innovation in firms with medium-high technological intensity.

Practical implications

For the success of product innovations, firms should establish mechanisms to obtain information about customer needs and expectations and to disseminate and effectively use this information among organizational functions. They also need to improve their technological capabilities to effectively transform market knowledge into product innovation.

Originality/value

The relationship between market orientation and product innovation has been examined in previous studies; however, there is an insufficient number of studies on the mediating role of technological capability in this relationship. This study aimed to eliminate the gap in the literature regarding the mediating role of technological capability. In addition, innovation activities of firms vary depending on the technological intensity, but only a limited number of evaluations have been conducted on this subject. This study contributes valuable knowledge to the relevant literature by examining the impact of market orientation dimensions on product innovation according to technological intensity.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

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Article
Publication date: 24 April 2009

Thilo A. Mueller and Hans Georg Gemünden

Developments in the software industry have shown the need for sustainable and effective management strategies, especially for new ventures. Entrepreneurship literature…

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1060

Abstract

Purpose

Developments in the software industry have shown the need for sustainable and effective management strategies, especially for new ventures. Entrepreneurship literature suggests marketing to be one of the pivotal predictors of business performance. Previous empirical studies have shown the importance of social interaction and team work quality for new venture performance. The purpose of this paper is to apply founder team interaction quality (IQ), and the customer and competitor orientation concept of marketing research to new software venture performance.

Design/methodology/approach

An empirical study using a fully standardized questionnaire was conducted in 101 young software ventures. Two founders in each company filled out the questionnaire separately allowing superior tests for reliability and validity of the research framework.

Findings

The results show team IQ to be a powerful predictor of both customer orientation and competitor orientation. Furthermore, a positive, linear relationship between competitor orientation and technological performance has been found. There is a curvilinear U‐shaped relationship between customer orientation and all examined success dimensions, i.e. economic, market and technological success.

Originality/value

Based on a theoretical research framework and a comprehensive empirical study, the paper contributes to a limited body of research and provides insight for managers of young ventures in the nature of teamwork and IQ and its effects on market orientation and company performance.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 32 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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