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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2021

Halit Keskin, Hayat Ayar Şentürk, Ekrem Tatoglu, Ismail Gölgeci, Ozan Kalaycioglu and Hatice Tuba Etlioglu

This study aims to determine the simultaneous effect of exporting firms' competitive strategies and capabilities on the achievement of competitive advantages and export…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to determine the simultaneous effect of exporting firms' competitive strategies and capabilities on the achievement of competitive advantages and export performance under the boundary conditions of competitive intensity. In so doing, the study combines the alternative theoretical lenses of the resource-based view (RBV) and the structure–conduct–performance (SCP) paradigm.

Design/methodology/approach

Primary data were obtained from 281 Turkish manufacturer–exporter firms operating in different sectors and located in several regions of the country. Structural equation modeling was utilized to test our conceptual framework, which combined the effects of RBV-based and SCP-based factors on competitive advantages and export performance under the moderating influence of competitive intensity.

Findings

This study reveals that unique firm capabilities, specifically informational, relational, and marketing capabilities, and competitive strategies, including differentiation and cost leadership, provide export firms with a competitive advantage and improve their export performance in foreign markets. Furthermore, competitive advantages partially mediate the effects of competitive strategies and unique firm capabilities on export performance. Finally, unexpectedly, and contrary to most of the existing literature, we find that competitive intensity negatively moderates the link between service advantages and export performance.

Originality/value

This research offers a comprehensive view of manufacturer–exporter firms' export performance by accounting for the overlooked simultaneous effect of firm capabilities and competitive strategies through the mediation of competitive advantages and under the boundary conditions of competitive intensity.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article
Publication date: 7 September 2021

Ahmed Agyapong, Suzzie Owiredua Aidoo and Samuel Yaw Akomea

The paper sought to uncover the conditions under which managerial capability enhances performance while considering the role of social capital within the unique boundary…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper sought to uncover the conditions under which managerial capability enhances performance while considering the role of social capital within the unique boundary conditions created by competitive intensity.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use multi-source data from 206 managers and owners of SMEs from a Sub-Saharan African nation – Ghana.

Findings

Using structural equation modeling (SEM) to analysis the data, the findings revealed that social capital serves as a mechanism through which managerial capability influences performance. Furthermore, the results indicate that competitive intensity does not significantly moderate this important indirect relationship. Implications: This study provides relevant knowledge for scholars, practitioners and policymakers on the role of managerial capability and how it may be harnessed in enhancing performance.

Originality/value

This paper provides a holistic understanding of the capability performance relationship in attempts at extending the literature by examining social capital as a mediator and competitive intensity as a contingent factor of this important relationship in a conditional indirect model.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 11 October 2019

Collins Kankam-Kwarteng, Barbara Osman and Jacob Donkor

The purpose of this paper is to improve the appreciation of the moderating role of competitive intensity on the relationship between low-cost strategy and firm performance…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to improve the appreciation of the moderating role of competitive intensity on the relationship between low-cost strategy and firm performance of restaurants.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses empirical data collected from 118 restaurants operators, Ghana. The effects of relationships and the interaction of low-cost strategy and competitive intensity were tested using regression analysis.

Findings

The findings indicate the existence of a significant positive relationship between low-cost strategy and firm performance. The effect of competitive strategy on firm performance was found to be partially significant. The findings revealed that competitive intensity does moderate the relationship between low-cost strategy and firm performance of restaurants.

Practical implications

Implications of the findings for restaurant operators suggest that effective application of low-cost strategy and monitoring and managing competitive intensity results in high performance.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the existing literature on low-cost strategy, competitive intensity and firm performance. More specifically, the interaction terms of low-cost strategy and competitive intensity have been explored in this study and can be used for further investigations.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Innovation and Entrepreneurship, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2071-1395

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Book part
Publication date: 20 January 2014

Jorge F. B. Lengler, Carlos M. P. Sousa and Catarina Marques

Despite some attempts to integrate the market orientation construct into the international marketing area, most conceptual and empirical studies have been conducted in the…

Abstract

Despite some attempts to integrate the market orientation construct into the international marketing area, most conceptual and empirical studies have been conducted in the context of domestic operations. To address this gap we examine whether competitive intensity moderates the relationships among the components of market orientation and export performance. Data was used from 197 Brazilian export companies. Results suggest that interfunctional coordination enhances customer and competitor orientation. Moreover, customer orientation has no direct effect on export performance, while competitor orientation has a positive effect on firm’s international performance. Findings also indicate that competitive intensity moderates all the relationships tested in the model.

Details

International Marketing in Rapidly Changing Environments
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-896-9

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Book part
Publication date: 12 November 2010

Olli Kuivalainen, Sanna Sundqvist and John W. Cadogan

Purpose – The purpose of this chapter is to study how dimensions of entrepreneurial orientation (competitive aggressiveness, proactiveness and risk taking) affect…

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this chapter is to study how dimensions of entrepreneurial orientation (competitive aggressiveness, proactiveness and risk taking) affect international performance in competitive and technology-intensive international environments.

Methodology/approach – To address the research questions, structural equation modelling is applied to Finnish survey data (N=271).

Findings – Our findings reveal that the dimensions of entrepreneurial orientation are differentially related to international performance, and that their effect is contingent on moderating variables.

Research limitations – One limitation is the use of cross-sectional data as it limits the possibility of drawing strong conclusions from the development of the relationships between the different constructs. Also the fact that the study was conducted in a single-country setting is a limitation.

Practical implications – Results indicate that entrepreneurial behaviour is of importance for international business managers. However, results imply that prior to striving for proactive behaviour, competitive aggressiveness and venturesome risk taking managers should study their international market environments carefully and truly understand the nature of these turbulent markets, as in many occasions strong emphasis on entrepreneurial behaviour did not contribute positively to the international performance indicators, such as increasing sales and profits.

Originality/value of the chapter – Present study extends the works of Zahra and Garvis (2000), Lumpkin and Dess (2001) and Wiklund and Shepherd (2005), for example, by (a) applying entrepreneurial orientation on international business, (b) examining the effects of different dimensions of entrepreneurial orientation on a firm's international performance and (c) extending the research of the role of moderating effects on the relationship between entrepreneurial orientation and firm performance.

Details

Reshaping the Boundaries of the Firm in an Era of Global Interdependence
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-088-0

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2021

Yu Wang, Hongyi Sun, Tao Jia and Jinliang Chen

This study is based on knowledge-based view to examine the relationships among buyer–supplier interaction, ambidextrous innovation and business performance. It includes…

Abstract

Purpose

This study is based on knowledge-based view to examine the relationships among buyer–supplier interaction, ambidextrous innovation and business performance. It includes competitive intensity and dysfunctional competition to clarify boundary conditions.

Design/methodology/approach

The ordinary least squares regression was conducted to test hypotheses. The survey data were collected from 182 Hong Kong manufacturing firms.

Findings

Buyer–supplier interaction facilitates ambidextrous innovation, namely exploitative innovation and exploratory innovation. In turn, exploitative innovation enhances business performance, whereas exploratory innovation has no influence on business performance. Competitive intensity strengthens while dysfunctional competition weakens the impact of buyer–supplier interaction on ambidextrous innovation.

Research limitations/implications

This study is based on the knowing processes of knowledge-based view. It contends that business performance is derived from ambidextrous innovation, which depends on the utilization of acquired supplier knowledge and the influence of external competitive environment. The test of relationships is constrained by the single-source and cross-sectional data.

Practical implications

Firms should engage in buyer–supplier interaction to acquire and utilize supplier knowledge. Meanwhile, they should monitor competitive environment to seize opportunities and avoid threats.

Originality/value

This study builds a holistic framework for buyer–supplier interaction, which reconciles the mixed arguments by distinguishing its effects on ambidextrous innovation, and by clarifying boundary conditions in terms of competitive intensity and dysfunctional competition.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2017

Anders Pehrsson

The study draws on the resource-based view and the contingency view of strategy. The purpose of this paper is to contribute to international strategy literature by…

Abstract

Purpose

The study draws on the resource-based view and the contingency view of strategy. The purpose of this paper is to contribute to international strategy literature by extending the current understanding of foreign subsidiary’s competitive strategy in terms of cost leadership and product differentiation.

Design/methodology/approach

Hypotheses concern associations between corporate support building on product and skills relatedness and subsidiary strategies. Also, it is hypothesized that strategies are due to the type of local competitive intensity. The hypotheses were tested on wholly owned subsidiaries of Swedish industrial firms in Germany, the UK and the USA.

Findings

Product and skills relatedness between the subsidiary and the corporate core unit are positively associated with the subsidiary’s emphasis on cost leadership. Also, a positive association was found between skills relatedness and product differentiation, and extensive competitive intensity strengthens the relationship.

Research limitations/implications

The study specifies what business relatedness is needed for a subsidiary’s competitive strategy; skills relatedness is more important than product relatedness; the type of local competitive intensity is important; corporate support and local strategy operate simultaneously.

Practical implications

Management is advised to implement a foreign subsidiary’s competitive strategy by recognizing the mechanisms identified in this study.

Originality/value

In a unique way, the study captures the role of corporate support of a foreign subsidiary’s competitive strategy relying on business relatedness and the importance of aligning the strategy with competitive intensity.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 29 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2021

Neeti Mathur, Satish Chandra Tiwari, T. Sita Ramaiah and Himanshu Mathur

This research paper aims to explore the relationship of financial performance and capital structure of Indian pharma firms of BSE 500, the impact of research and…

Abstract

Purpose

This research paper aims to explore the relationship of financial performance and capital structure of Indian pharma firms of BSE 500, the impact of research and development (R&D) expenditure on financial performance and also explore the moderating role of competitive intensity between the existing relationship of capital structure and firm performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The balanced panel data of listed pharma firms of BSE 500 are used for the research study, and the present study adopts both the panel and ordinary least square (OLS) estimation techniques to draw the results.

Findings

The results exhibit that the high debt ratio is harmful for the accounting performance of the selected sample of pharma firms of BSE 500. Besides, market competition negatively moderates the relationship between capital structure and firm performance.

Research limitations/implications

The research findings provide evidence for the policymakers/regulators that the sample firms should discourage the high debt financing in the presence of competitive intensity in the product marketplace.

Originality/value

The core contribution of the current research is to examine impact of R&D expenditure on financial performance and the moderating role of market competition on the relationship of capital structure and firm performance to the best of the authors' knowledge, and no single study has previously explored this relationship in the context of BSE 500 pharma firms.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 47 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

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Article
Publication date: 3 June 2019

Gurjeet Kaur Sahi, Mahesh C. Gupta, T.C.E. Cheng and Subhash C. Lonial

Premised on dynamic capability theory, the purpose of this paper is to explore the link between entrepreneurial orientation (EO) and operational responsiveness (OR). In…

Abstract

Purpose

Premised on dynamic capability theory, the purpose of this paper is to explore the link between entrepreneurial orientation (EO) and operational responsiveness (OR). In addition, grounded in contingency theory, the authors examine the roles of competitive intensity and technological turbulence in affecting the entrepreneurial orientation and OR link.

Design/methodology/approach

This study proposes that firms’ entrepreneurial initiatives in terms of innovativeness, proactiveness and risk-taking significantly affect their responsiveness. Competitive intensity and technological turbulence moderate the EO and OR relationship. Using hierarchical regression analysis, the authors analyze the data generated from a sample of 164 small-and-medium enterprises in the USA.

Findings

The findings show that entrepreneurial initiatives are instrumental in responding to market requirements, which in turn results in superior performance. The authors also find that the interactive effects of innovativeness/risk-taking and competitive intensity are significant and positive, while those of innovativeness/proactiveness and technological turbulence on responsiveness are significant but negative. These findings imply that OR is effective when the level of competitive intensity is high while technological turbulence is low.

Research limitations/implications

The authors conclude the paper by suggesting that entrepreneurial actions are pre-requisites for OR, which becomes effective only when the market experiences a moderate level of competition and a low level of technological change. The study provides implications for cross-functional research in the areas of entrepreneurship and operations management (OM) and also suggests future directions in this research stream.

Originality/value

Although responsiveness has been recognized as a critical competitive capability in the OM literature, its relationship with EO is not fully understood and has not been empirically tested. Moreover, the interplay between EO and competitive intensity/technological turbulence and their effects on effective OR have not been gauged in the past.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 39 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 24 August 2020

Lingling Wang, Wenhong Zhao, Zelong Wei and Changbao Zhou

This paper aims to explore how intra-industry entrepreneurial experience and failure entrepreneurial experience affect novelty-centered business model design in a new…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore how intra-industry entrepreneurial experience and failure entrepreneurial experience affect novelty-centered business model design in a new venture. Moreover, the authors also consider whether the contingent value of entrepreneurial experience may differ according to competitive intensity.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey via questionnaire was conducted with 290 entrepreneurs and top managers from Chinese new ventures that provided the research data. Hierarchical regression analysis was used to test the proposed theoretical hypotheses.

Findings

The empirical results indicate that intra-industry entrepreneurial experience has an inverted U-shaped effect on novelty-centered business model design, whereas failure entrepreneurial experience has a negative effect on novelty-centered business model design. Furthermore, the authors also find that competitive intensity weakens the inverted U-shaped effect of intra-industry entrepreneurial experience on novelty-centered business model design.

Originality/value

This study offers new insights into the effects of intra-industry entrepreneurial experience and failure entrepreneurial experience on novelty-centered business model design and provides useful suggestions for new ventures to promote business model design.

Details

Chinese Management Studies, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-614X

Keywords

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