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Article
Publication date: 22 October 2010

Xinming Deng, Zhilong Tian, Shuai Fan and Muhammad Abrar

The purpose of this paper is to explore the prediction of competitive response based on the characteristics of market and non‐market actions comprehensively, and develop a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the prediction of competitive response based on the characteristics of market and non‐market actions comprehensively, and develop a four‐stage decision‐making model of firm's competitive action, which is significant for Chinese practicing managers when formulating and implementing the strategies, and further predicting competitors' strategic choices.

Design/methodology/approach

The research adopted the method of structured content analysis and carried out the survey in Chinese home appliance industry, mainly covering the largest firms, including TCL, Hisense, Changhong, Konka, Haier, and Skyworth. The method of multiple regression analysis was employed to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The results show that in order to comprehensively forecast competitor's responding behaviors, the firms could not only limit their perspective to market field but also pay attention to non‐market. Additionally, in the process of dynamic interaction, the attacking or responding action is not independent and it is related significantly to another three type decisions, which are market and non‐market, strategic and tactic, and collective and individual. Further, the study asserts that, in market field, tactic activity is more likely to trigger competitor's response than strategic one, while in non‐market, the situation is just the opposite. Meanwhile, the study figured out that individual market attack is easier to trigger individual market and non‐market response, as well as collective market response. While for non‐market action, whatever it is individual or collective, both would be easy to provoke competitor's collective response.

Originality/value

The research findings extend the existing competitive interaction theory to non‐market field. When forecasting competitor's choice of the competitive action, the firms could not only limit their perspective to market field but also pay attention to non‐market, attaching importance to certain situation of competitor's taking such non‐market action as corporate philanthropy, etc. to launch an attack or a response for gaining competitive advantage.

Details

Nankai Business Review International, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8749

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 22 November 2012

Larry Nash White

Purpose – The broader research question being addressed is whether head library administrators (HLAs) have the competitive nature required to respond appropriately to…

Abstract

Purpose – The broader research question being addressed is whether head library administrators (HLAs) have the competitive nature required to respond appropriately to strategic and competitive pressures in the library service environment. In addressing this broader research question, this study seeks to determine how HLAs perceive themselves and their peers’ competitive behavior with regard to personal hobbies, sports and games, their personal career performance, and their library's performance.

Design/methodology/approach – A census of the 103 HLAs from North Carolina's two-year and four-year academic libraries (including both public and private institutions) and the 77 public library systems in the state was conducted using a mixed methods design survey instrument to obtain information regarding their perceptions about both their own and their peers’ competitive behaviors.

Findings – The survey response rate was 49% and included a sample that reflected an equal distribution of HLAs by library types and the demographics of the study population. An analysis of survey responses indicate that while HLAs do perceive themselves and their peers to be competitive in behavior for their own personal career and their library's performance, they are not competitive in nonwork activities such as personal hobbies or sports and games. The high levels of reported competitiveness in the respondent's and library's performance variables may indicate HLAs are highly motivated in performing competitive behaviors when it benefits their own careers. The extreme lack of reported competitive behavior in the strategy related variable (sports and games) may indicate HLAs are less motivated or ill-prepared in the strategic response skills required to respond appropriately to strategic and competitive pressures in the library service environment. Respondents projected their own perceptions of competitive behavior unto their peers, which indicates HLA perceptions of their peers in competitive behaviors (possibly other areas) needs to be examined in greater detail to assess the validity of these perceptions.

Research limitations/implications – Data analysis was unable to determine any significant statistical relationships between HLA competitive behavior responses and the variables examined. Further research is needed to identify environmental, psychological, or professional variables that may explain the degrees, motivations, and differences in reported competitive behaviors.

Practical implications – Based on the study findings, libraries may not have head administrators who can effectively respond to strategic challenges facing their libraries. Many libraries may have HLAs who are: not as motivated to respond to strategic needs as career performance needs; have a false set of perceptions of their competitiveness or competitive abilities; have a false set of perceptions of their peers’ competitiveness or competitive abilities; and providing a false sense of security to their libraries that believe the HLA that leads them will enable their libraries to effectively respond to the service environment challenges. In combination, these findings indicate that the library's ability to effectively compete/strategically respond may be dependent on inconsistent and potentially unreliable competitive abilities and personal career motivations. This could make developing strategic responses and sustainability more difficult for libraries in the future.

Originality/value – The study is the first of its kind to examine whether HLAs have the competitive nature required to respond appropriately to strategic and competitive pressures in the library service environment. Having a complete and effective understanding of how head library administrator's competitive behaviors work and impact their library's strategic response development is essential in preparing and supporting existing and future head library administrators in leading their libraries in strategic responses. As the library's head administrator is the primary driver of strategy and strategic/competitive responses for their library, the competitive behaviors and their motivations becomes a critical component of the library's success in effectively responding to strategic challenges and being sustainable for meeting future generation's information needs. It is hoped that by exploring head library administrator's competitive behavior in this study, the researcher has laid the initial framework for understanding how a library's leader will competitively respond or be capable of responding to today's library service environment challenges that have become very competitive in nature and require library organizations to continually develop and perform activities that generate increasingly effective strategic performance and value.

Details

Advances in Library Administration and Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-313-1

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 April 2015

Wu Wei, Xiang Hu, Yanping Li and Peng Peng

The purpose of this paper is to seek to advance the understanding of competitive interaction framework based on competitive dynamics theory that investigates how nonmarket…

1006

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to seek to advance the understanding of competitive interaction framework based on competitive dynamics theory that investigates how nonmarket and market factors concurrently affect the relationships among action and response, their integration, and initiating firm performance.

Design/methodology/approach

To test the hypotheses for this study, the authors used data collected from the news found in web sites of 72 Chinese firms over a five-year period from January 2007 to December 2011. The authors use the approach suggested by Baron and Kenny (1986) to test the mediated effect of rival response and speed, after structured content analysis is adopted to overcome the challenges of identification and measurement by using a sample of competitive actions and responses.

Findings

The results test partial mediating role of rival response and speed in linking nonmarket, market, and integrated action with initiating firm performance outcomes. Rival responses and speed may vary systematically in nonmarket action. The relationship between the integration of competitive action and initiating firm performance is positive, high, and significant.

Research limitations/implications

The results of this study were limited by a sample in China. The authors further need to consider how nonmarket and market components are operationalized in different institutional environments. The authors study only captures observable moves reported in the news of Chinese firms’ web sites. This single-data source collection raises the specter of cognitive bias. It is advised to collect data from multiple sources, perhaps directly measuring the managers’ perception by using a questionnaire-based survey.

Practical implications

Firms whose main focus is to launch market actions in an effort to gain competitive advantage should ensure that their nonmarket actions constitute interfirm rivalry. Particularly, this study also encourages managers to continuously and rapidly integrate nonmarket actions into their analyses of market competition for firm success. Additionally, managers need to develop effective information-processing mechanisms to analyze, monitor, forecast, and interpret rival response and speed for each competitor.

Originality/value

The research contributes to the authors’ understanding of the nature of nonmarket and market competition by bridging nonmarket action into traditional competitive dynamics.

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2000

Scott G. Dacko

Given that the majority of firms are followers of pioneering firms into new, related product markets, managers of almost all firms can benefit from benchmarking their…

1775

Abstract

Given that the majority of firms are followers of pioneering firms into new, related product markets, managers of almost all firms can benefit from benchmarking their competitive responses to pioneering new product introductions. This paper examines the competitive responses of firms not only in terms of the time until their responding new product introduction, but also in terms of the firms’ preceding stages of competitive response: awareness, interest, and evaluation. For example, how long does – and should – it take a follower firm to become aware of a pioneering new product introduction? A general conceptual framework and basic methodology is proposed for firms to evaluate and benchmark their competitive responses. Follower firm responses to pioneering new low‐fat food product introductions in North America are examined and illustrate the opportunity for benchmarking firms’ competitive responses.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 7 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 September 2011

George M. Giaglis and Konstantinos G. Fouskas

The purpose of this paper is to study the impact of managerial perceptions regarding the competitive environment and organizational capabilities on the way firms respond…

1470

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the impact of managerial perceptions regarding the competitive environment and organizational capabilities on the way firms respond to their rivals' competitive actions.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors draw on competitive dynamics theory to develop a model that is empirically tested in 174 firms from 22 manufacturing, trade and service sectors in Greece.

Findings

The results show an association between managerial perceptions on the one hand and the innovativeness and breadth of competitive responses on the other. More specifically, perceptions of competition intensity, substitution threats and increased buyer powers are associated with broader and more innovative competitive reactions. Similarly, perceptions of strong internal, mediating (managerial) and external (market sensing) capabilities also affect the breadth and innovativeness of competitive responses.

Originality/value

Further to advancing theory in competitive dynamics, the authors contribute to a deeper understanding of the drivers of competitive retaliation that managers can use to anticipate their rivals' retaliation schemes when initiating competitive actions.

Article
Publication date: 27 April 2010

Konstantinos G. Fouskas and Dimitris A. Drossos

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of managerial perceptions of the competitive environment on shaping the way firms respond to their rivals in terms of…

1368

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of managerial perceptions of the competitive environment on shaping the way firms respond to their rivals in terms of speed, intensity, innovativeness and breadth of competitive responses.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper develops a research model based on current literature of competitive dynamics and then test this model in 174 firms selected from 22 manufacturing, trade and service sectors in Greece.

Findings

The results indicate that managerial perceptions regarding the competitive environment affect the competitive response behaviour of companies in terms of specific characteristics and thus can be used as predictors of responses to competitive actions. This is in line with recent research in competitive dynamics, arguing that managers decode cues of their competitive environment in terms of threats and opportunities and respond to them accordingly.

Research limitations/implications

This study could benefit from a larger sample and replication in more countries. Moreover, more perceptional influences on competitive response characteristics should be examined in depth in future research with a view to enhancing awareness of competitive interactions.

Practical implications

Managers will develop a better understanding of factors influencing competitive response characteristics and will be able to better predict rivals' retaliation schemes when initiating competitive actions and foresee forthcoming industry changes.

Originality/value

Previous research in competitive dynamics is associated with measuring the impact of various measurable situational and environmental characteristics, such as industry growth and organizational age, in competitive response characteristics. It instead focus on the role of managerial interpretations of the competitive environment and how they affect the way they respond to a firm's competitors.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 110 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2005

Carmen Otero‐Neira and José A. Varela‐González

The interdependence of firms in the marketplace implies that the effectiveness of an action cannot be valued without considering potential reactions. Therefore, the main…

1054

Abstract

Purpose

The interdependence of firms in the marketplace implies that the effectiveness of an action cannot be valued without considering potential reactions. Therefore, the main objectives of this paper are to analyse the effect of the initiating company characteristics on the perceived attributes of its action and to understand the effect of these dimensions on the number of companies that respond to it.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on action‐reaction dynamics, a series of hypotheses was theoretically justified inking the characteristics of the actor with the dimensions of its action, and these dimensions with the probability of response from rivals. Their validity with data obtained from a survey of marketing managers of Spanish companies was checked, using a variety of statistical techniques.

Findings

Results indicate that the probability of reaction is influenced by the level of visible threat of action. Further findings indicate that the leadership position of the actor has an indirect influence on the probability of response.

Research limitations/implications

The size of the sample and the measures used are both limited. Also, the explanatory capacity of the model could be improved by considering new variables.

Practical implications

Prior knowledge of the probability of a reaction is an important input for the managerial process of strategic planning, capable of improving the success rate in implementing actions and thereby the competitive position.

Originality/value

Few research studies of competitive interaction have focused on the probability of response, into which this paper offers an insight.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 January 2008

Zhilong Tian and Shuai Fan

The purpose of this paper is to integrate the corporate market and non‐market behaviors (such as social, legal, and political activities) into the research of competitive

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to integrate the corporate market and non‐market behaviors (such as social, legal, and political activities) into the research of competitive interaction.

Design/methodology/approach

“Structured content analysis” is used in analyzing the longitudinal data of five real estate enterprises from an industrial journal during the last seven years.

Findings

Competitive interactions with market and non‐market contents involve the expanded competitive scope, behaviors, and relationships. New explanations beyond previous literatures are provided to explain the expanded competitive behaviors (especially in resource‐oriented and mixed scope) by analyzing the characteristics of actions and responses.

Practical implications

Firms must effectively focus on the interaction of market and non‐market competitive behaviors. Industrial competitors in the market environment can engage in collaborative or cooperative actions with non‐market issues in order to obtain collective benefits.

Originality/value

This paper expands on previous studyies of competitive interaction by integrating the important non‐market content, especially categorizing it in the Chinese transitional environment with typical evidence.

Details

Journal of Chinese Economic and Foreign Trade Studies, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-4408

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 November 2016

Wen Pei and Jeng-Huan Li

The credit card business has been one of the key businesses for banks in Taiwan. The purpose of this paper is to use competitive dynamics and structured context analysis…

Abstract

Purpose

The credit card business has been one of the key businesses for banks in Taiwan. The purpose of this paper is to use competitive dynamics and structured context analysis (SCA) to explore the competition relationships among market, resources, and strategies concerning the credit card issued banks in Taiwan.

Design/methodology/approach

The market commonality and resource similarity analysis of competitive dynamics in the first stage obtained the competitive mapping of four major credit card issue banks, as well as the differences of competition strategy. In the second stage, 1,968 pieces of data on credit card news from 2013 to 2014 were collected. SCA was used to analyze the competitive action, competitive response, number of responses, response lag, and response order.

Findings

The competitor mapping and four hypothesis obtained from competitive dynamics correspond to the credit card competition strategy, as obtained from SCA.

Originality/value

This research combined competitive dynamics and SCA to analyze the credit cards market in Taiwan. The research model could be used in the other financial market.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 45 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2000

C. Carl Pegels and Yong Il Song

This paper is a study of competitive and cooperative interactions among members of a competitive industry group. There are few strategic, tactical or market moves that do…

1619

Abstract

This paper is a study of competitive and cooperative interactions among members of a competitive industry group. There are few strategic, tactical or market moves that do not affect competition in any industry. Competitive and cooperative interactions among competitive firms are studied to determine how the reactions of competitors to an initiator of an action cause convergent or divergent patterns. It is hypothesized that the patterns, or cycles, of competitive and cooperative interactions are a function of complexity of the interaction cycle, degree of offensiveness of participants’ moves, action reversibility, previous interaction experience, interaction cycle visibility and response time. An empirical test of the hypothesis revealed that the two most strongly supported hypotheses were: interaction cycle complexity increases the likelihood of interaction cycle convergence, and interaction cycle visibility increases the likelihood of interaction cycle divergence.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 38 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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