Search results

1 – 10 of over 111000
Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 19 October 2020

Prisca Brosi and Marvin Schuth

Purpose – We aim to elucidate the influence of leaders' emotion expressions on the social distance between leaders and followers in face-to-face and digital communication.…

Abstract

Purpose – We aim to elucidate the influence of leaders' emotion expressions on the social distance between leaders and followers in face-to-face and digital communication.

Design/methodology/approach – Literature review

Findings – Following functional theories on emotions, leaders' expressions of socially engaging emotions (e.g., guilt, happiness, gratitude, and compassion) lower social distance. Leaders' expressions of socially disengaging emotions (e.g., anger, contempt, disgust, and pride) increase social distance. In digital communication, we propose that the effect of socially engaging and disengaging emotions depends on the social presence that is provided by the different digital communication media.

Practical implication – Based on our theoretical model, we derive implications for (1) leaders' use of face-to-face communication, (2) the importance of digital communication with high social presence, (3) leaders' use of digital communication as a tool for emotion regulation, and (4) coping strategies when communicating via digital means with low social presence.

Details

Emotions and Service in the Digital Age
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-260-2

Keywords

Click here to view access options

Abstract

Details

Strategic Leadership Models and Theories: Indian Perspectives
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-259-2

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 July 2020

Reena Biju and Atul Arun Pathak

Faced with dynamic and challenging environments, organizations today expect all their leaders, including their women leaders, to be highly intrapreneurial. However…

Downloads
273

Abstract

Purpose

Faced with dynamic and challenging environments, organizations today expect all their leaders, including their women leaders, to be highly intrapreneurial. However, intrapreneurship is traditionally perceived to be a masculine activity. In order to appear intrapreneurial, women leaders consciously behave like men and suppress their feminine characteristics. This results in “emotional labor” that causes undue stress, emotional exhaustion, and burnout. Organizations can help intrapreneurial women leaders succeed by a combination of gender-related sensitization, focused training, setting up sharing and communication platforms, encouraging self-support groups and providing formal and informal mentorship to their women employees.

Design/methodology/approach

We carried out qualitative research which involved 31 in depth semi-structured in-person interviews (including 11 repeat interviews) with 20 women leaders from seven large organizations from the Indian IT industry. The interviewees had 15 years of average work experience, were in the 35-50 years age group, and held senior management functional or project management responsibilities. The interviews were typically 60 minutes each. The researcher took detailed notes, and subsequently, manually carried out multiple levels and multiple rounds of coding (initially open-coding followed by focused coding) to identify and abstract the themes and categories.

Findings

Our study identified that women leaders who are expected to behave as intrapreneurs, face “emotional labor” which results in stress, emotional exhaustion and burnout. To help women leaders succeed, a well-defined set of organizational interventions including gender sensitization, training, sharing & communication platforms, self-support groups, and formal and informal mentoring are useful.

Research limitations/implications

To increase the generalizability of our study beyond the Indian cultural context and beyond the IT industry, future researchers may carry out both qualitative and larger sample quantitative studies in other countries, and draw upon data from multiple industries. The issues arising out of emotional labor of women intrapreneurial leaders are likely to be present in a wide range of industries and cultural contexts. However, there may be nuanced contextual differences that need further exploration. Future research can build on our findings and explore moderators, contingencies, and boundary conditions that affect the suitability of organizational interventions that we have suggested.

Practical implications

Emotional well-being of women intrapreneurial leaders would help them take innovative organizational initiatives, and make the organization strategically agile. To help women leaders be intrapreneurial, organizations need many interventions and need to provide the required supporting infrastructure.

Social implications

Ways to resolve gender-related issues in workplaces are suggested.

Originality/value

Our study is valuable as it simultaneously considers two strategic organizational objectives of intrapreneurship and gender diversity of leadership teams. The paper provides useful prescriptions for organizations to help women intrapreneurial leaders succeed. This will help organizations that are facing dynamic external environments become innovative and strategically agile.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 35 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 May 2001

Venkat R. Krishnan

This study attempts to draw a value profile of a transformational leader – the leader who transforms people and organizations. It compares the terminal and instrumental…

Downloads
5123

Abstract

This study attempts to draw a value profile of a transformational leader – the leader who transforms people and organizations. It compares the terminal and instrumental value systems of leaders who are more transformational with those of leaders who are less transformational, using a sample of 95 pairs of leaders and subordinates of a non‐profit organization in the United States. Findings reveal that transformational leaders do have some identifiable patterns in their value systems. They give relatively high priority to “a world at peace” and “responsible”, and relatively low priority to “a world of beauty”, “national security”, “intellectual”, and “cheerful”. Results also suggest that transformational leaders might give greater importance to values pertaining to others than to values concerning only themselves.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 12 February 2018

Katie Lynn Akers

This paper aims for an open discussion of new traits which are important to the success of future leaders. By understanding what is important to the new generations coming…

Downloads
1202

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims for an open discussion of new traits which are important to the success of future leaders. By understanding what is important to the new generations coming into leadership roles and how that differs from previous generations, a new set of leadership traits can be developed to help future leaders find success. The purpose of this paper is to challenge the current practices of leadership traits that are being developed and defined for making successful leaders.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper was designed to raise questions regarding what traits are being developed in current leaders to make them successful and provide two suggestions for new traits to be developed in future leaders. The bulk of the research was from books that analyzed leadership characteristics and the generational needs of the previous and current generations. The information was accompanied with personal experience working as and with the new generation of potential leaders.

Findings

This paper initiates the need for a discussion on why it is important to start discussing the development of the future generation of leaders. It suggests that the traits of curiosity and belief will be beneficial to the success and fulfillment of future leaders.

Research limitations/implications

Because of the newness of this concept in regards to curiosity and belief being leadership traits, the research comes from theories and a real life, relevant understanding of leadership development. Therefore, it is encouraged to continue to build upon the thoughts and ideas presented in the paper.

Practical implications

This paper includes implications that there is a need for leadership development and that through the development of future leader traits, based on what they want from the workforce, will help to make them successful and sustainable future leaders.

Originality/value

This paper fulfills a need to understand what areas future leaders will need to be developed to create a new generation of effective and successful leaders.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 37 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2006

Roland K. Yeo

This paper aims to explore the relationship between the worldviews of leaders and their corresponding leadership styles. It also proposes a leadership development

Downloads
4541

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the relationship between the worldviews of leaders and their corresponding leadership styles. It also proposes a leadership development framework integrating training strategies and pertinent leadership skills.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper proposes a modeling of seven leader types and illustrates the predominant worldview of each leader type. Separately, a modeling of six distinct leadership skills is used to distil the strengths and weaknesses of each leader type, from which specific training implications are discussed.

Findings

First, autocratic and bureaucratic leaders tend to adopt a negative worldview which impinges on their level of power and influence. Second, charismatic and visionary leaders are well‐equipped with instrumental and creative imagination skills, reflecting their collaborative, global and transformative worldview. Third, both enabling and servant leaders display a quieter persona in terms of assertiveness, as they believe action speaks louder than words. They are highly consultative and participatory in their management approach.

Practical implications

CEOs and HRD professionals may now be able to assess their leaders' worldviews and match these with their leadership styles to design appropriate training programs for leadership development. A number of practical suggestions presented in this paper will provide pointers for training implementation.

Originality/value

The value of this paper lies in examining the root of a leader's attitude and behavior, that is, to focus on his/her worldview. The author's point of view is that a strategic leadership development program should first allow leaders to experience a variety of worldviews through simulation and other techniques, which will in turn influence the way they think and act.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 38 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 11 June 2018

Clinton Longenecker and Gary S. Insch

The purpose of this paper is to identify the specific practices senior leaders need to engage in to best support their organization’s leadership development initiatives…

Downloads
1431

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the specific practices senior leaders need to engage in to best support their organization’s leadership development initiatives. All organizations invest billions of dollars around the world in leadership development, but there is surprisingly little attention given to the important role that senior leaders play in supporting these efforts. This paper draws upon focus group research with those responsible for designing and implementing leadership development initiatives to identify the strategic role senior leaders play in formal leadership development efforts.

Design/methodology/approach

To explore this issue, we conducted structured focus groups with over 250 executives, HR leaders and talent managers from over 30 different global organizations. Participants were responsible for leadership development in their respective organizations, averaged 44 years of age, 18 years of work experience, and were 54 per cent men and 46 per cent women. These focus groups were being used to solicit the input of those responsible for leadership development to identify the specific things senior leaders need to do to best support these leadership development efforts. The participants were asked to answer the following question, “Based on your experience, what specific things do senior leaders in your organization need to do to best support your efforts at developing high performance and strong leadership talent?”

Findings

Focus groups identified a series of key senior leader behaviors that are necessary to support an organization’s leadership development efforts. These findings, included the importance of senior leadership commitment to the process, the identification of specific leadership behaviors necessary to support these initiatives, the requirement of clearly understanding the organizations leadership development process, providing appropriate financial, staffing and technology resources to support these efforts, creating a climate of continuous learning and role modeling appropriate behaviors, among other findings.

Research limitations/implications

While the focus groups in this research and the subsequent qualitative and quantitative analysis of the findings were rigorous, the participants were not a randomly selected group and were by definition a convenience sample. At the same time, the implications of this research are significant on this important subject and provide a solid baseline for both practitioners and researchers alike to help explore, identify and build on best practices for senior leaders to support organizational leadership development initiatives.

Practical implications

Leadership is the key to success in any organization. To maintain that success, leadership development and continuous learning is imperative. This paper provides ten specific practices based on the focus group research that can help senior leaders create a more supportive environment for effective leadership development initiatives. The methodology used to identify these factors can be duplicated in other organizations to help them build an appropriate model for senior leader support for leadership development in their enterprise.

Social implications

The social implications for improving any organizations’ leadership is significant. It is known that effective leaders foster innovation, improve teamwork, create a more positive workplace, drive continuous improvement in quality, reduce turnover and improve the financial performance of most enterprises. With this backdrop, organizations can and must do everything in their power to accelerate leadership development and to engage in activities that do so. This paper will help pinpoint leaders and leadership development researchers and experts in that direction.

Originality/value

This manuscript offers a unique perspective on the role of senior leaders from the perspective of those who design leadership development programming in their organizations. And given both the readership and focus of this journal, this is an important perspective which takes into account the operational demands of leadership development in the strategic role senior leaders play in supporting these efforts.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2002

Nikos Bozionelos and Stuart Lusher

Reports on the experience of production team leaders and their line managers on the quality of training and development of the former. The setting was the UK plant of a…

Downloads
2127

Abstract

Reports on the experience of production team leaders and their line managers on the quality of training and development of the former. The setting was the UK plant of a US‐based global organization competing in the telecommunications technology sector. Team leaders’ and line managers’ views were complemented with data from personnel records. The findings suggested that team leaders’ development was perceived to be inadequate in both the technical and leadership domains. Team leaders perceived deficiencies in their technical training and competence; and line managers viewed that team leaders lacked managerial and leadership skills. The analysis of personnel records corroborated those views as it suggested that existing training and development structures were not being properly implemented or designed. This situation can impact unit performance. Suggestions regarding rectification of such situations are made.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 16 November 2015

Brian Leavy

This interview covers research published in three major books by Bill George. The first was in response to a massive governance crisis as high-flyers like Enron, WorldCom…

Downloads
1585

Abstract

Purpose

This interview covers research published in three major books by Bill George. The first was in response to a massive governance crisis as high-flyers like Enron, WorldCom and Tyco crashed. George’s first book, offered an alternative to self-serving leadership, was “Authentic Leadership” in 2003. Having been a highly successful CEO, he watched with grave concern as the stock market and media mistakenly venerated CEOs like Bob Nardelli at Home Depot and Hewlett-Packard’s Carly Fiorina for their charisma, style and image rather than their character and substance.

Design/methodology/approach

In 2005-2006 he created a research team at Harvard Business School to determine how to develop authentic leaders. This project still stands as the largest, in-depth research of leaders ever undertaken. The result was his second book, True North, published in 2007.

Findings

A third book, Discover Your True North, the result of a second Harvard study displays the dramatic changes for the better in leadership in the past decade.

Practical implications

The best of today’s corporate leaders are less hierarchical and bureaucratic than their predecessors. They focus primarily on gaining alignment around their organization’s mission and values, and empowering their employees to step up and lead rather than merely following rules and processes. They operate less in their self-interest, and more in service to others and pursuit of greater societal good on a global scale. The new leaders are authentic and open, rather than focused on leadership style and charisma.

Originality/value

Bill George’s research has defined an effective alternative to self-serving leadership, one that can be a model for 21st Century leaders facing the demands of a rapid change, continuous innovation global marketplace. Authentic leaders make good strategists.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 43 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1997

Richard Dobbins and Barrie O. Pettman

Adopt the characteristics of leaders, do what leaders do, and you become a leader.

Abstract

Adopt the characteristics of leaders, do what leaders do, and you become a leader.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

1 – 10 of over 111000