Search results

1 – 10 of over 9000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 25 February 2021

Els-Marie Anbäcken, Anna-Lena Almqvist, Carl Johansson, Kazushige Kinugasa, Miho Obata, Jinhee Hyun, Jinsook Lee and Young Joon Park

Purpose: The aim is to explore how family relations are affected by societal changes in relation to informal and formal caregiving and self-determination of older adults.…

Abstract

Purpose: The aim is to explore how family relations are affected by societal changes in relation to informal and formal caregiving and self-determination of older adults.

Design/methodology/approach: Care managers (CMs)/social workers (SWs) (N = 124) participated in a comparative vignette study including Japan, South Korea, and Sweden. Systems theory was used.

Findings: Japanese CMs/SWs clearly describe their efforts to create networks in a relational way between formal and informal actors in the community. South Korean CMs/SWs balance between suggesting interventions to support daily life at home or a move to a nursing home, often acknowledging the family as the main caregiver. In Sweden, CMs/SWs highlight the juridical element in meeting the older adult and the interventions offered, and families primarily give social support. Regarding self-determination, the Japanese priority is for CMs/SWs to harmonize within the family and the community. South Korean CMs/SWs express ambivalent attitudes to older adults’ capability for self-determination in the intersection between formal and family care. Swedish CMs/SWs adhere to the older adult’s self-determination, while acknowledging the role of the family in persuading the older adult to accept interventions. The results suggest emerging defamilialization in South Korea, while tendencies to refamilialization are noticed in Japan and Sweden, albeit in different ways.

Research limitations/implications: In translation, nuances may be lost. A focus on changing families shows that country-specific details in care services have been reduced. For future research, perspectives of “care” need to be studied on different levels.

Originality/value: Using one vignette in three countries with different welfare regimes, discussing changing views on families’, communities’ and societal caregiving is unique. This captures changes in policy, influencing re- and defamilialization.

Details

Aging and the Family: Understanding Changes in Structural and Relationship Dynamics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-491-5

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 April 2020

Dongxiang Zhao, Qiping Zhang and Feicheng Ma

The purpose of this paper is to investigate eldercare issues in China through exploring what was discussed about eldercare in a Chinese online community for older adults (OCOA).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate eldercare issues in China through exploring what was discussed about eldercare in a Chinese online community for older adults (OCOA).

Design/methodology/approach

Netnography was used to explore eldercare-related online discussion in a Chinese OCOA – LaoYouBang. After a two-month-long online observation, 275 microblogs and 594 comments were collected and analysed qualitatively and quantitatively.

Findings

The main findings include as follows: the users involved in an online discussion about eldercare were consist of four categories, namely, elderly user, non-elderly user, advertiser and community administrator. Non-elderly user include the elderly’s caregivers and families, young and middle-aged people concerning about eldercare. From 2012 to 2017, eldercare issues gradually became refined and differentiated in China and elderly users’ contribution proportion and activeness increased yearly. According to the results of thematic analysis, users’ information needs for eldercare included opinion, news, practice, emotion, knowledge and others. In China, some changes have taken place in the public’s conceptions of eldercare, embodied in the changes in the public’s attention, attitudes and cognition. Changes in user structure and communication patterns in OCOA have also been noted. OCOA plays an important role in eldercare information dissemination and social support exchange and helps to meet the eldercare challenges.

Originality/value

This study explored an online community for older adults. This is the first netnography study in the information field on Chinese OCOA. This paper provides new perspectives to explore eldercare issues and OCOA in other regions and cultures and it also provides some suggestions to improve OCOA.

Details

The Electronic Library , vol. 38 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 May 2020

Gigi Lam

Hong Kong implements a policy for the aging population involving the core themes of “aging in place as the core,” “institutional care as backup” and “continuum of care.”…

Abstract

Purpose

Hong Kong implements a policy for the aging population involving the core themes of “aging in place as the core,” “institutional care as backup” and “continuum of care.” Encouraging elders to live independently at home is a top priority, and elders who are not able to live at home independently are provided with various residential care services, namely Hostels for the Elderly, Homes for the Aged, Care and Attention (C&A) Homes for the Elderly and Nursing Homes (NHs). The purpose of this paper is to analyze the adoption of the publicly funded model of providing residential care services of elderly in Hong Kong.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper analyzes the current conundrum encountered by elders in residential care services and makes recommendations. A comprehensive literature review was conducted covering relevant government reports, academics' journal papers and nongovernmental organizations’ reports concerning residential care service of elderly from 1965 to present.

Findings

Subsidized residential care homes for the elderly (RCHEs) clearly outperform private RCHEs in terms of space and staff provisions, but the supply of subsidized RCHEs cannot meet the demand. Hence, between 2007 and 2018, the average waiting time was 33 months for NHs and that for C&A homes was 23 months. Several viable measures to meet the demand are purchasing Enhanced Bought Place Schemes (EBPSs) from private RCHEs, subsidizing elders who opt for living in private RCHEs by providing them with Comprehensive Social Security Assistance (CSSA) and residential care service voucher (RCSV) and subsidizing elderly applicants who opt for living in RCHEs in Guangdong. However, these viable measures are problematic because of the inadequate quality of EBPSs and private RCHEs, which is attributed to the costing arrangement of public and private RCHEs that were established in the colonial period. The brief history of RCHEs also indicates a deviation from the original policy aim, namely aging in place, which was introduced in the Green Paper on Services for the Elderly in 1977.

Practical implications

The supply and quality of community and home care services should be thoroughly examined; effective community and home care services can prevent and even delay unnecessary institutionalization. Another complementary solution is to devise a long-term plan for residential care services. To address disparities in quality standards in different RCHEs, adopting the combination of punitive and compliance models such as conducting frequent inspections and implementing an accreditation system for private RCHEs is imperative.

Originality/value

Although the principle of “aging in place” originated in 1977, the institutionalization rate 6.8% of elders was unexpectedly high in Hong Kong and even surpassed the Asian counterparts. It necessities to rethink how to implement policy concerning long-term care services of elders.

Details

Asian Education and Development Studies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-3162

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 13 July 2021

Terence Y. M. Lam and Junjie Yan

Shanghai is currently faced with a rapid increase in the ageing population and demand for elderly homes. Continuing care retirement community (CCRC) has been emerging as a…

Abstract

Purpose

Shanghai is currently faced with a rapid increase in the ageing population and demand for elderly homes. Continuing care retirement community (CCRC) has been emerging as a high-end alternative to offer specialised accommodation to the elderly in major cities. Since the first development in 2008, the industry is now still at the infancy stage. This study aims to examine the investment barriers hindering the supply and demand of CCRCs with an aim to recommend practical and senior housing policy measures to facilitate CCRC developments.

Design/methodology/approach

Multiple-case study method was used to confirm whether the literature findings on investment barriers apply to the context of Shanghai. Four representative CCRC development cases in Shanghai were examined, in which qualitative data were collected from interviews with experienced CCRC development managers and quantitative data from a questionnaire survey of the CCRC residents.

Findings

Operation management experience, financial risks and government support policy were found to be the main supply barriers. Chinese traditional family-oriented culture and affordability were not the main demand barriers of CCRCs in Shanghai. Poor quality of services and living environment were identified as the main barriers suppressing the demand for CCRC.

Research limitations/implications

Although common trends and views can be drawn from the representative cases in Shanghai to provide valid results, further research should be conducted on other major cities in China so that the results can be widely applied.

Practical implications

Successful CCRC investment strategy should focus on partnering with experienced professional eldercare management companies, provisions of high-quality medical professionals and trained care personnel and delivery of flexible care service, along with intensive capital flows for land, construction and operating costs.

Social implications

Additional senior housing policy support should be established to promote the CCRC supply to address the ageing needs, particularly granting lands for CCRC developments at Tiers 1 and 2 major cities where the land cost is high.

Originality/value

This research’s practical and policy measures can be applied to enable and promote CCRC developments in Shanghai, thus benefitting both housing investors and the government. The findings also form a baseline for CCRC developments in other major cities.

Details

International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8270

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 August 2005

Gad Vitner, Vera Shalom and Avital Yodfat

To review the voluntary operations of Counseling Services for the Elderly, which has operated since 1972 under the National Insurance Institute of the State of Israel.

Downloads
1014

Abstract

Purpose

To review the voluntary operations of Counseling Services for the Elderly, which has operated since 1972 under the National Insurance Institute of the State of Israel.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper considers the elderly population and its characteristics and the gradual development of the volunteering counseling services. The characteristics of the volunteers and their motivation in this work are also discussed. The training that volunteers undergo is constantly being updated and upgraded, and details are provided that cover home visits, consultations and special projects.

Findings

Currently, Counseling Services for the Elderly operates 4,278 volunteers in 21 branches across the country, supporting thousands of the elderly on a relatively low budget of less than $3 million for 2003.

Originality/value

The paper presents a unique voluntary service that is fully integrated into national welfare for the elderly. The service meets the objectives of assistance to the elderly while helping to maintain and develop the quality of life of the volunteer.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 18 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 15 September 2014

Atsuko Kawakami

This chapter will review the evaluations of the newly developed elderly care system in Japan, Long Term Care Insurance, and its social implications with the focus on…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter will review the evaluations of the newly developed elderly care system in Japan, Long Term Care Insurance, and its social implications with the focus on demographic change.

Methodology/approach

By reviewing literature, this chapter will examine how demographic and social change over the years has impacted the features of caregivers. Then, how this policy change has demedicalized the aging process will be described. Finally, this chapter will evaluate whether this insurance has shifted the responsibility for elderly care from the family to society as the governmental slogan advertised.

Findings

The new insurance has offered more options in different services and established a new norm of self-reliance and determination for one’s own aging however it is doubtful if this new insurance has shifted the responsibility from family to society.

Research limitations/implications

Applying the implications of policy reforms for elderly care in Japan to the United States, one can assume the traditional U.S. norms and values can facilitate effective utilization of the elderly care system. However, since each nation faces different problems with its specific condition, continuous studies and observations on the relationship between elderly care, immigration issues, and demographic changes will be necessary in order to offer more specific suggestions for each aging nation.

Originality/value of chapter

As Japan’s new insurance scheme for the elderly has been studied by many aging nations, recommendations for more comprehensive plans are suggested including building a community-based support system into the Long Term Care Insurance scheme to prevent social isolation and respond to emergency situations for the elderly.

Details

Technology, Communication, Disparities and Government Options in Health and Health Care Services
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-645-3

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 April 2019

Jingyu Yu, Guixia Ma and Shaoxing Cai

Aging-friendly environments have been encouraged to develop at the city level, district level and community level in China. In the process of rapid urbanization, the state…

Abstract

Purpose

Aging-friendly environments have been encouraged to develop at the city level, district level and community level in China. In the process of rapid urbanization, the state of aging-friendly communities in old and new neighborhoods is disparate. Hence, the purpose of this paper is to investigate aging-friendly communities and identify the disparities in old and new neighborhoods.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 1,172 elderly respondents completed the survey. Of these, 576 seniors lived in an old community developed before 2000, and 596 lived in a new community developed after 2000. In total, 17 physical environment factors and 10 social environment factors were identified.

Findings

The results indicated that public spaces, facilities and transportation in old neighborhoods were inferior to those in new neighborhoods. Most social environment factors in new neighborhoods achieved higher satisfaction levels than those in old neighborhoods. The satisfaction levels of aging-friendly community factors in both old and new neighborhoods were below the expectation levels of elders.

Practical implications

In order to improve physical aging-friendly environments in old neighborhoods, it is suggested that full use is made of school facilities and the renovation of old buildings. The locations of public transportation stations in new neighborhoods are recommended to be revised within 5-min walking distances of senior residents. Both old and new neighborhoods are encouraged to improve social aging-friendly environments by increasing the coverage of medical services and creating multiple approaches to recreation activities.

Originality/value

These findings have empirical significance for urban planners and policy makers, in regard to identifying disparities between old and new neighborhoods, and understanding the equitable allocation and distribution of urban resources.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 26 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 20 October 2014

Monika Reichert, Gerd Naegele, Ruth Katz, Ariela Lowenstein and Dafna Halperin

To describe, analyze, and compare two long-term care (LTC) systems for elders in Germany and Israel.

Abstract

Purpose

To describe, analyze, and compare two long-term care (LTC) systems for elders in Germany and Israel.

Methodology

Secondary analyses of data on LTC beneficiaries, structure of service provision and content analyses of policy documents in a comparative perspective based on the Esping-Andersen welfare state typologies.

Findings

Descriptive background of demographic attributes in the two countries; discussion of LTC development laws which in Israel focuses on “aging in place” concept, where in-kind services are geared only to community-dwelling frail elders while in Germany it’s for community and institutionalized elders. Analyses of various service types provided their use, resources invested, and benefits incurred for frail elders and their family caregivers.

Practical and social implications

The advantages and shortcomings of the two systems were analyzed with recommendations for future developments. Such comparisons across nations can inform social policy debates in Germany and Israel as to how to prepare for population aging. The originality of such comparison can shed light on issues for LTC service development in other countries.

Details

Family and Health: Evolving Needs, Responsibilities, and Experiences
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-126-8

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1986

C. Bielawska and G.S. Rai

Elderly population We all have a vested interest in the care of our elderly, whose needs and expectations are as important as those of younger people.

Abstract

Elderly population We all have a vested interest in the care of our elderly, whose needs and expectations are as important as those of younger people.

Details

Journal of Management in Medicine, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-9235

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Sung‐hyuk Kim, Hong‐bumm Kim and Woo Gon Kim

This study examines how the lifestyle of senior citizens affects their choices of retirement communities. A survey was conducted among 256 potential customers of elderly

Downloads
5325

Abstract

This study examines how the lifestyle of senior citizens affects their choices of retirement communities. A survey was conducted among 256 potential customers of elderly housing, targeting citizens over 45 years old who were residents of Seoul, the capital city of Korea, at the time of the survey. Findings reveal that most respondents preferred a location based in proximity to Seoul, convenience to the suburbs, a pleasant surrounding environment, and physical equipment and facilities. Medical services and community services were also found to have an impact on preference for residency. Canonical correlation analysis between the factors of elderly lifestyle and selection attribute factors of senior housing facilities demonstrates various significant relationships with implications for developers.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 9000