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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Emma Parry, Clare Kelliher, Tim Mills and Shaun Tyson

This paper aims to examine the practice of human resource management (HRM) in voluntary sector organisations providing substance misuse treatment services and to compare…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the practice of human resource management (HRM) in voluntary sector organisations providing substance misuse treatment services and to compare these findings with similar organisations in the public sector.

Design/methodology/approach

HRM practices are examined using a survey of voluntary and public sector drug and alcohol treatment provider organisations. The survey data are supported with a number of case studies and qualitative interviews with the HR managers of such organisations.

Findings

The data show that in many areas practice is broadly similar in the voluntary and public sectors. However, there are also a number of important differences, influenced by both their relative financial positions and the value‐led nature of the voluntary sector.

Originality/value

Recent estimates suggest that over half a million people are in paid employment in the UK voluntary sector; however, relatively little is known about HRM within this sector. This paper provides a valuable insight into HRM within this sector and highlights the similarities and differences between this and the public sector.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1996

Gwen Jaffro

Reviews the development of the Irish voluntary sector and examines the unique characteristics of the legal framework in which voluntary organizations operate and the…

Abstract

Reviews the development of the Irish voluntary sector and examines the unique characteristics of the legal framework in which voluntary organizations operate and the funding and staffing arrangements. Focuses on recent changes in the relationship between the state and organizations. Speculates on the future of these organizations by examining issues such as contracting, cohesiveness and general evolutionary trends.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 9 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 8 November 2011

Anders la Cour and Holger Højlund

Purpose – To analyze the emergence of new organizational forms in the Danish welfare sector.Design/methodology/approach – Drawing on Niklas Luhmann and Gunther Teubner…

Abstract

Purpose – To analyze the emergence of new organizational forms in the Danish welfare sector.

Design/methodology/approach – Drawing on Niklas Luhmann and Gunther Teubner, the research analyzes governmental documents, policy programs, action plans, and strategic documents.

Findings – A partnering structure has emerged with a new politics of voluntarism, complex forms of integration and new imaginary distinctions between voluntariness and public care. This can usefully be conceptualized as aspects of the stabilization of a “third-order system.” The research identified a number of different managerial strategies for involvement in the system.

Practical and social implications – Social welfare has become a mix of public and civil society values and norms, and extensive resources have been invested from both governmental and nongovernmental sides to build up shared competences for the new forms of partnering-based organization. However, to act according to the new principles of partnering, at the strategic and managerial level, the voluntary organizations have to behave in a schizophrenic manner – as both individual organizations and cooperational partners within the system.

Research implications – The concept of “third-order system” is especially useful in analyzing mixed forms of management in the welfare sector.

Originality – Different forms of radical organizational analysis are combined to develop a notion of “third-order system” in the welfare sector.

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1996

Aubrey Wilson and Gina Pimm

Examines the huge voluntary sector contribution and shows that vast numbers of the population involve themselves in voluntary work at some time or another. Estimates that…

Abstract

Examines the huge voluntary sector contribution and shows that vast numbers of the population involve themselves in voluntary work at some time or another. Estimates that the value of their contributions could be as high as £40 billion. This huge sum is generated by dedicated people who nevertheless are for the most part not managed or badly managed, are a constantly shifting group and are not subject to the normal disciplines of business. Sets out how human resource management, as adopted by industry, can be adapted sensitively for the volunteer work‐force, despite the fact that normal levels of management ‐ control and direction ‐ are either unusable or so weak that they can be accepted or ignored, according to mood and conditions.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 24 July 2007

Claire Moxham and Ruth Boaden

The purpose of this research paper is to identify the impact of contextual and processual factors on the development, use and impact of performance measurement systems in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research paper is to identify the impact of contextual and processual factors on the development, use and impact of performance measurement systems in voluntary and community organisations.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews the applicability of business and public sector performance measurement frameworks to voluntary organisations. It presents the findings of a study through four case studies and draws conclusions on the impact of measurement systems in the voluntary sector.

Findings

The research identifies a low utilisation of performance measurement frameworks and discusses what systems are currently used, how such systems are administered and the impact of measurement on performance.

Research limitations/implications

The evidence is based on four micro‐voluntary organisations that receive public sector funding. The findings are based on the perceptions of the organisations delivering the services and illustrate the relationship between the public and voluntary sectors. Further, cases utilising a range of stakeholders should be studied to examine the validity, reliability and generalisability of the presented results. However, given that there is practically no empirical evidence at all on this issue at present, the study provides useful evidence that can be further developed.

Practical implications

The research findings present contextual and processual barriers to measuring the efficiency and effectiveness of voluntary organisations. For performance measurement frameworks to support current practice, these barriers need to be recognised and addressed.

Originality/value

The paper highlights performance measurement implications for a sector that is unaccustomed to scrutiny. As little research has been conducted within this sector, these findings contribute to the body of knowledge.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 27 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

Tamara Essex

There has been much research focusing on contracting and its effect on individual voluntary sector organisation, and some mapping of the extent of voluntary sector…

Abstract

There has been much research focusing on contracting and its effect on individual voluntary sector organisation, and some mapping of the extent of voluntary sector participation in joint community care planning. Each of these is a new and formal relationship with the statutory sector, and in many cases the tasks are fulfilled by the same voluntary sector worker (usually the senior paid officer of the agency). But the impact that these two new relationships have on the voluntary organisation’s perception of its dependence and inter‐dependence has received less attention. The paper will draw on structured interviews in three local authorities, with voluntary sector participants in contracts for social care, and with participants in joint community care planning groups, as well as on documentary research. It will explore the impact of the evolving roles for those seeking to operate effectively in the pluralist provision of public services. It will analyse experiences within joint community care planning structures, and will analyse experiences of contractual relationships. The paper will seek to identify the elements present in each research site which influence the culture of joint working within the two statutory/ voluntary relationships.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 11 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

Gillian Kellock Hay, Rona S. Beattie, Ron Livingstone and Pauline Munro

Examines the context of the voluntary sector and its impact on organisational processes. Provides a selective overview of traditional literature on change management and…

Abstract

Examines the context of the voluntary sector and its impact on organisational processes. Provides a selective overview of traditional literature on change management and assesses its relevance for the voluntary sector. Investigates alternative models that could facilitate understanding of change processes in the voluntary sector. Discusses the results from an empirical study into the change management experiences of a voluntary sector umbrella body. Concludes with key HRM lessons for the wider voluntary sector at this time of significant change, as well as highlighting the impact of contextual factors on the application of generic models of change.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1994

Brian Robinson

Tests the hypothesis that voluntary groups, generally, are learningorganizations. Reviews the literature on non‐profit organizations andconcludes that many of the…

Abstract

Tests the hypothesis that voluntary groups, generally, are learning organizations. Reviews the literature on non‐profit organizations and concludes that many of the well‐known charities, for example, have now become established hierarchies following an inital period of mission formulation and organizational evolution when they could be considered as learning organizations. Discovers that, once the primary objective has been attained and funds start to flow, the voluntary organization tends to become staffed full‐time with people and the volunteer tends to become an irrelevance. Gives examples from the steam railway preservation movement to suggest that only those voluntary groups with a primary mission incapable of being achieved in the short term and which demand a high level of volunteer input remain as learning organizations.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

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Article
Publication date: 2 May 2008

Christina Schwabenland and Frances Tomlinson

The purpose of this paper is to draw on postcolonial theorising on hybridity as a heuristic to explore current tensions described by managers in voluntary organisations

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to draw on postcolonial theorising on hybridity as a heuristic to explore current tensions described by managers in voluntary organisations engaging with diversity issues. Voluntary organisations are particularly valued for their innovative services developed in response to the needs of their constituents. However, managers describe increasing tension between their organisation's mission on behalf of marginalised and excluded groups and the increasing expectation that these organisations act as contractors to the state and as providers of professionally managed services.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on interviews with a range of key informants, including chief executives, specialist diversity managers and project workers, working in UK‐based voluntary organisations; the interviews explored diversity issues in a broad sense including campaigning and advocacy work as well as service provision.

Findings

Evidence was revealed of innovative ways of working that respond to the needs of particular communities and constituencies – thereby supporting the rationale behind the “business case” for diversity. Also found was evidence of pressures from regulators and funders to standardise that make such innovation less likely; involving processes of undermining the efforts of organisations to manage and organise themselves independently, and of essentialising – fixing the subjects of diversity in an identity of difference and inferiority. The findings suggest that “managing diversity” is inherently problematic.

Originality/value

There is little academic research that applies a critical perspective to voluntary organisations and less using postcolonial theory as a heuristic. However, voluntary organisations are central to both national and international anti‐poverty initiatives and programmes designed to facilitate community renewal.

Details

Critical perspectives on international business, vol. 4 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-2043

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Article
Publication date: 10 June 2019

Koet Vitiea and Seunghoo Lim

This study aims to identify which actors play leadership and brokerage roles in voluntary environmental collaborations and how the corporate social responsibility (CSR) of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to identify which actors play leadership and brokerage roles in voluntary environmental collaborations and how the corporate social responsibility (CSR) of actors is associated with such voluntary networking behaviours in Cambodia.

Design/methodology/approach

To achieve these purposes, this study mainly uses social network analysis to capture the properties of networking behaviours in the voluntary collaborative activities underlying three main environmental issues: waste disposal, energy and water pollution. The study focusses on the collaborative efforts undertaken by actors across multiple sectors: governmental organizations, for-profits and civil society organizations.

Findings

The results show that the government plays the leading role in voluntary environmental collaborations across environmental issues; however, the actual implementation is expanded to be undertaken by non-state actors. Moreover, CSR has positive associations with networking and brokerage roles; therefore, this study reveals the utility of various voluntary policy instruments.

Practical implications

This study demonstrates the role of governmental initiation and its influence on non-state actors, even for voluntary environmental tools. The CSR initiatives of private actors can also be supported and encouraged by the government, which will promote participation by private actors in voluntary collaborative networks and their leading role as network facilitators.

Social implications

By understanding the positions and roles of each actor in the environmental collaborative networks, environmental policymakers can better understand the possibilities and the capabilities of each actor both to improve policy design and learning and to respond to policy changes effectively.

Originality/value

Voluntary collaboration and CSR are non-regulated policy tools; however, they can be promoted and introduced into society by governmental organizations, and they affect each other.

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

Keywords

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