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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2017

Alisa P. Lertpratchya, John C. Besley, Adam Zwickle, Bruno Takahashi and Cameron Thomas Whitley

The purpose of this study is to assess the effectiveness of higher education institution as a sustainability communication channel. The theory of planned behavior was used…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to assess the effectiveness of higher education institution as a sustainability communication channel. The theory of planned behavior was used to examine the degree to which a student’s tenure at a large university with active and visible sustainability initiatives is associated with changes in views about sustainability and changes in reported sustainability behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

This study involved a campus-wide online survey on undergraduate students at a large mid-western university. A direct measurement approach to the theory of planned behavior was used to measure changes in attitudes, normative beliefs, perceived behavioral controls and self-reported behaviors on five different environmental sustainability behaviors.

Findings

Overall findings support the notion that higher education institutions can be effective communication channels for sustainability issues, as students who have been in college for a longer period of time reported somewhat more positive attitudes, normative and efficacy beliefs and more sustainable behaviors.

Practical implications

By measuring specific components of the theory of planned behavior, this study provides insights on specific areas in which campaigns targeting college students in different college years could become more effective.

Originality/value

Few studies have assessed college as an effective sustainability communication channel despite the fact that it is potentially a powerful channel to reach a large population at their critical age. This study also measures specific components to sustainability behaviors by using the theory of planned behavior as a guiding framework.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 18 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 29 July 2021

YoungJu Shin and Yu Lu

Communication plays an important role in health decisions and behaviors. Friends and family exert influence through communication and, when considering smoking, this is…

Abstract

Purpose

Communication plays an important role in health decisions and behaviors. Friends and family exert influence through communication and, when considering smoking, this is particularly salient among those friends and family who smoke. Guided by primary socialization theory and integrated behavioral model, the present study examined the effects of having smoking friends and family on smoking beliefs (e.g. negative consequences, positive reinforcement and negative reinforcement), cultural normative beliefs, pro-smoking injunctive norms, smoking intentions and recent smoking behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

Cross-sectional online survey data were collected from college students (N = 227). Multivariate analysis of covariance and path analysis were performed.

Findings

College students who reported having smoking friends were more likely to report higher levels of positive reinforcement, cultural normative beliefs, pro-smoking injunctive norms, positive attitudes, smoking intentions and recent smoking behaviors than those without smoking friends. Frequent communication with smoking friends was significantly related to cultural normative beliefs, pro-smoking injunctive norms, positive attitudes and smoking intentions. The analysis, however, did not yield statistical support for the associations between frequent communication with smoking family and smoking perceptions, norms and behaviors.

Originality/value

The present study highlights the vital roles of friends' influence for college students' smoking behaviors. Communication-based intervention can help better equip college students with communication strategies that prevent tobacco use by promoting more effective conversations with friends.

Details

Health Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 19 March 2018

Ezgi Toplu-Demirtaş, Christine Murray and Zeynep Hatipoglu-Sümer

Studies on restrictive engulfment (RE) – a subtype of psychological aggression in intimate relationships – have focused either on insecure attachment or relationship…

Abstract

Purpose

Studies on restrictive engulfment (RE) – a subtype of psychological aggression in intimate relationships – have focused either on insecure attachment or relationship satisfaction, not both. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to investigate relationship satisfaction as a potential mediator of the associations between anxious and avoidant attachment and RE perpetration among college students.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 322 college students (178 women, 137 men, and seven other gender-identified) completed the experiences in close relationship inventory, relationship assessment scale, and RE subscale of the multidimensional measure of emotional abuse.

Findings

Among the sample, 89.3 and 90.5 percent of the college women and men, respectively, reported to have used isolating, restricting, monitoring, and controlling behaviors. The results of structural equation modeling revealed that all direct paths except for that from avoidant attachment to RE were significant. Moreover, significant indirect paths were identified from anxious and avoidant attachment to RE via relationship satisfaction.

Research limitations/implications

The results of this study should be interpreted with consideration of the study’s limitations. First, the data were drawn from a convenience sample of Turkish college students. Second, the design of the study is correlational; therefore, we cannot assume causality. Finally, this study utilized self-report and retrospective data.

Practical implications

Though the findings are preliminary, they may inform college counselors and other mental health practitioners about the nature of RE within college students’ dating relationships. College students who are unhappy with their dating relationships but still in those relationships (i.e. they choose not to leave) should be assessed for whether they are the perpetrators and/or recipients of psychological aggression, especially in light of the high rates of this form of aggression in the current and previous studies. Furthermore, assessing psychological dating aggression perpetrators for insecure attachment styles may help mental health professionals who work with college students, envisage the sessions toward areas in the need of improvement, such as their views of themselves and others. Self-esteem, feelings of insecurity and inadequacy in relationships, and dependency can be worked with these clients.

Social implications

The results of this study also have implications for the prevention of psychological aggression before it occurs. The need for prevention programs is evident in the high rates of psychologically controlling behaviors among college students. It may be useful to implement campus wide programs to raise awareness regarding psychological aggression, such as through events, seminars, posters, flyers, and talks with student groups.

Originality/value

Despite the limitations of this study, its findings offer insight into the factors that influence the perpetration of psychological aggression within dating relationships among college students. Adult attachment theory offers a useful lens for understanding the possible driving forces behind college students’ controlling behaviors toward their dating partners. In particular, college students who demonstrate an insecure attachment style – and especially an anxious attachment style – combined with low levels of relationship satisfaction appear to be at a high risk for perpetrating RE behaviors.

Details

Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-6599

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2021

Cheng-Min Chao, Tai-Kuei Yu and Tai-Yi Yu

The purpose of this study is to develop and empirically test a model that can predict factors affecting student recycling behavior. The theoretical model was based on…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to develop and empirically test a model that can predict factors affecting student recycling behavior. The theoretical model was based on motivation, place attachment, environmental concern and interpersonal altruism.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional study was conducted with college students in Taiwan using self-report questionnaires. Of the 800 distributed questionnaires, 523 were completed (response rate of 65.4%) and were analyzed using structural equation modeling. Partial least squares (PLS) were used to test the models and hypotheses.

Findings

The results showed that environmental concern, motivation, interpersonal altruism and place attachment have significant positive effects on recycling behavior and motivation and place attachment have significant positive effects on interpersonal altruism. This research contributes to the existing literature by discriminating between two sorts of motivation: intrinsic and extrinsic. Based on these findings, suggestions for future research and practical implications are presented.

Originality/value

Few studies have linked motivation, interpersonal altruism, environmental concern and place attachment to recycling behavior. Therefore, this study aimed to explore these relationships, specifically as they affect college students’ behavior. This paper anticipates that increased knowledge about recycling behavior could be used to support the wider adoption of recycling practices.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2015

Alvin J Williams and Ben Oumlil

The reviewed literature emphasized that the student loan debt issues have a lot of connections to the economy. This conclusion is in support with broader evidence that…

Abstract

Purpose

The reviewed literature emphasized that the student loan debt issues have a lot of connections to the economy. This conclusion is in support with broader evidence that high student debt levels are a drag on economic growth. Additionally, disadvantaged and other vulnerable groups, including students, are more likely to be excluded from the formal, regulated financial sector and not be able to take advantage of mainstream financial service providers (e.g. lack access to credit, insurance, and other formal financial services). Among the primary reasons cited for this financial exclusion has to do with a lack of understanding or familiarity with traditional financial services. The aim of this paper is to look at alternate approaches in promoting financial literacy to manage the huge private debt burden facing this important segment of the population. The purpose of this paper is to advance a model of college students’ financial capabilities enhancement to partially alleviate some of the problems related to deficits in financial knowledge among this population. The integrative model provides a framework to be operationalized by institutional decision-makers and policymakers at all levels. The model can be adapted to fit unique institutional circumstances and culture. Successful implementation of the model has the potential to enhance the quality of financial health among college students and young adults.

Design/methodology/approach

The manuscript’s aim is to advance a model of college students’ financial capabilities in an effort to prevent their financial exclusion. The proposed model provides a framework to be operationalized by institutional decision-making processes. The model offers six distinct, but inter-related components – antecedent variables, program design and implementation, delivery modalities, program content, behavioral outcomes, and measurement and assessment.

Findings

The underlying raison d’etre for the model is to offer a comprehensive, inclusive, across-the-board roadmap to guide universities, and other organizations in conceptualizing, planning, organizing, implementing, and assessing financial education-related systems and processes designed to enhance the long-term financial choices and behaviors of students. Through careful consideration of each of the phases of the model, decision-makers at all levels and all types of organizations should have a stronger grasp of the depth and breadth of actions required to effect the desired changes in students’ financial behavior.

Research limitations/implications

As with any paper there are limitations. The paper is conceptual and lacks data to test some of the linkages. Future research efforts should posit specific propositions to be tested based on the linkages offered in the model. Given the nature of the research theme, there is considerable benefit from taking a case-based approach to future research to offer more in-depth analyses of student financial literacy deficits across different situations and types, student markets, and educational institutions. The current research could also benefit from a stronger cross-cultural focus. While huge college student debt is probably more burdensome in the USA, it is helpful to get input from students in countries that lack a tradition of heavy borrowing to pay for college costs. Researching debt management trends across cultures should provide useful micro- and macro-economic data for policymakers and others.

Practical implications

The paper introduces a model of college students’ financial capabilities enhancement and financial exclusion’s prevention that offers one avenue to partially remedy the direct and indirect ills perpetrated and perpetuated by insufficient financial knowledge among young adults, especially the college segment (i.e. to promote financial inclusion and financial exclusion’s prevention). The model provides a comprehensive and integrative path for college administrators and others to consider when designing programs to enhance the overall financial knowledge acumen and savvy of college students. Specifically, the model discusses antecedent variables, program design and implementation, delivery modalities, program content, behavioral outcomes, and measure and evaluation options.

Social implications

There is considerable concern among students, parents, marketers, and public policymakers regarding deficiencies in financial knowledge and capabilities among the young adult population. Students have massive student loan debt, collectively, and there is a multifaceted clarion call to develop integrative solutions to this daunting scenario. The paper discusses the gravity and consequences of financial literacy deficits among college students and some associated solutions.

Originality/value

The model offers six distinct, but inter-related components – antecedent variables, program design and implementation, delivery modalities, program content, behavioral outcomes, and measurement and assessment. The model is posited as an “intervention strategy” capable of strengthening the capacity of young college adults to make informed financial decisions, thus impacting their quality of life over the long run. In particular the model offers a form of empowerment to this consumer segment. As stated, the underlying raison d’etre for the model is to offer a comprehensive, inclusive, across-the-board roadmap to guide universities and other organizations in conceptualizing, planning, organizing, implementing, and assessing financial education-related systems and processes designed to enhance the long-term financial choices and behaviors of students. Through careful consideration of each of the phases of the model, decision-makers at all levels and all types of organizations should have a stronger grasp of the depth and breadth of actions required to effect the desired changes in students’ financial behavior.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Article
Publication date: 3 July 2017

Yam B. Limbu

By applying the information-motivation-behavioral (IMB) skills model, the purpose of this paper is to examine the direct and indirect effects of credit card knowledge and…

Abstract

Purpose

By applying the information-motivation-behavioral (IMB) skills model, the purpose of this paper is to examine the direct and indirect effects of credit card knowledge and social motivation on credit card misuse behavior mediated through credit card self-efficacy among college students in the USA.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 427 participants was surveyed. Structural equation modeling was used to assess the hypothesized model.

Findings

Credit card knowledge and social motivation were inversely associated with credit card misuse mediated through credit card self-efficacy. Credit card knowledge had a direct negative relationship with credit card misuse. The results confirm the theoretical relationships in the IMB model.

Practical implications

The results offer several implications for bank marketers and policy makers. The IMB model could be used to predict credit card abuse among college students; credit card literacy programs should incorporate strategies that can enhance students’ knowledge, social motivation, and behavioral skills with regard to responsible use of credit cards.

Originality/value

This study is unique in that it applies the IMB model to examine predictors of credit card misuse among college students.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 35 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2001

Jung‐Im Seo, Jan M. Hathcote and Anne L. Sweaney

The expanding nature of the men’s casual apparel market represents a considerable economic growth area in the apparel industry. Of particular interest is the demand for…

Abstract

The expanding nature of the men’s casual apparel market represents a considerable economic growth area in the apparel industry. Of particular interest is the demand for casual clothing by college‐age men. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the influences of casualwear involvement (high, medium, low) on the purchasing behaviour of male students in relation to their shopping dimensions, personal characteristics, buying behaviour, shopping attributes and information sources. Data were collected using a questionnaire delivered by e‐mail to a systematically selected sample, with 176 male college students responding from 18 colleges in Georgia, USA. The results revealed that there were unique shopping patterns which differ according to casualwear involvement, indicating a deep interest in casualwear and appearance. Most male students had a medium to high casualwear involvement sum score; however, as age increased this score decreased. Both the personal and the market information sources indicated that customers with high involvement were more experienced than either the low or medium involvement groups. The medium involvement casualwear group was composed of consumers who were likely to make purchases during the sale season. The low involvement cohort was moderate casualwear buyers in terms of volume and purchased expensive casualwear. This study shows that classifying male college students by involvement can be helpful in marketing to this group. Apparel marketers are well advised to focus on this neglected cohort of male casualwear consumers.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

Fredric Kropp, Anne M. Lavack and Stephen J.S. Holden

Examines the personal values of college‐age smokers and beer drinkers, as well as their susceptibility to interpersonal influence. Findings suggest that, compared to…

Abstract

Examines the personal values of college‐age smokers and beer drinkers, as well as their susceptibility to interpersonal influence. Findings suggest that, compared to non‐smokers, smokers are less likely to place importance on the values of security, being well respected, and having a sense of belonging. When compared to non‐beer drinkers, college students who are beer drinkers are more likely to place importance on the value of excitement, and are less likely to place importance on the value of security. Smokers are less susceptible to interpersonal influence than non‐smokers, but there are no differences in susceptibility to interpersonal influence between beer drinkers and non‐beer drinkers. Values and susceptibility to interpersonal influence can play a useful role as descriptors, and possibly as predictors, of drinking and smoking behavior.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 16 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 6 March 2017

Pascale Brodeur, Simon Larose, George M. Tarabulsy and Bei Feng

The purpose of this paper is to explore associations between different mentor behavioral profiles and mentees’ perceptions of the quality of mentoring relationship, the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore associations between different mentor behavioral profiles and mentees’ perceptions of the quality of mentoring relationship, the usefulness of the mentoring, and their college adjustment during the first year of college.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used a quasi-experimental design and involved the participation of 253 student mentees and 246 students from a control group. Cluster analysis on the responses of mentees on the mentor behavior scale was used to identify behavioral profiles of academic mentors.

Findings

Four distinct behavioral profiles were identified: optimal (high scores on mentor structure, involvement, autonomy support, and competence support); sufficient (moderate on all scales); controlling (low on autonomy support but high on other scales); and inadequate (low on all scales). Compared to mentees exposed to sufficient and inadequate profiles, mentees exposed to the optimal profile perceived the mentoring relationship and its usefulness as more positive. Furthermore, they reported better social adjustment in college compared to a control group, whereas mentees exposed to the inadequate profile reported poorer adjustment. Interestingly, mentees exposed to the controlling profile found the mentoring relationship useful.

Research limitations/implications

This study provides new empirical bases for the behavioral profiles of mentors that best meet mentees’ academic adjustment challenges. Limitations of the study include the absence of the mentors’ perceptions in the creation of behavioral profiles and the fact that the profiles were analyzed based on a single program.

Originality/value

Behavioral profiles of academic mentors were examined through the lens of a strong theoretical model that emphasizes the important role of structure, involvement, autonomy support, and competence support in the academic adjustment of mentees.

Details

International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6854

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 April 2015

Ruoh-Nan Yan, Su Yun Bae and Huimin Xu

The study aims to examine whether and how second-hand clothing shoppers differ from non-shoppers on various psychographic variables, including environmentalism, perception…

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to examine whether and how second-hand clothing shoppers differ from non-shoppers on various psychographic variables, including environmentalism, perception of contamination, price sensitivity and perception of vintage clothing. Additionally, this study hopes to uncover whether and how the aforementioned psychographic variables help predict second-hand clothing shopping behaviour, specifically shopping frequency at second-hand clothing stores.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through a survey method from 152 college students.

Findings

Results showed that college students who shopped at second-hand clothing stores were more likely to be environmentally conscious, more sensitive to higher prices and more likely to wear used clothing to express a vintage look and to be “green”, and to perceive used clothing to be less contaminated, as compared to those who did not shop at second-hand clothing stores. This study concluded that, among college students, second-hand clothing shoppers may do so not only for economic reasons but also for creation of style and feeling special about themselves.

Research limitations/implications

This study suggests that college students who shop at second-hand clothing stores are different from those who do not shop at second-hand stores in terms of their environmental attitudes, perceptions of contamination from used clothing, sensitivity to prices and how they feel about vintage clothing. Further, financial concern (i.e. price sensitivity) is no longer the only reason for second-hand clothing shopping.

Originality/value

Little research has been conducted to understand second-hand clothing shopping behaviour among college students. This study examined multiple psychographic variables and provided insights into college students’ second-hand shopping behaviour.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

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